Thursday, August 21, 2014

Tuesday, April 29, 2008 rahjcc, Community Member, asks

Q: Is Nissan Fundoplication really safe?

Getting ready for this surgery after months of testing and years of proton pump inhibitor taking.  (Bravo Probe revealed very high acid levels of 64 points and my esophagus was very inflamed with ulcerations).  My insurance denied NDO procedure, but will pay for surgery.  I am concerned about the after effects.  Is the vomiting issue (can't vomit if you get sick) really an issue and how does that work?  Also, I need to have endoscopies done yearly.  Does the surgery effect that?

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Answers (18)
Vicki M, Health Guide
4/30/08 1:52pm

Hi rahjee,

 

You can read about a user named Karla here in her sharepost regarding her Nissan Fundoplication surgery last year. You can also read more about the surgery itself and the alternatives here in the treatments database.

 

Take care and stay in touch! Let us know how your surgery turns out and how you are doing!

Vicki M

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dalemarieAndLee, Community Member
10/10/12 4:51pm

my wife is a prime candidate for this procedure now too.  she is tired of sleeping in the sitting-position, and wonders about the aftermath about the surgery. . .being told presently that she will be on liquids only for two weeks after the suregery? are there any alternatives? Lee&Dalemarie

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dalemarieAndLee, Community Member
10/10/12 4:53pm

my wife is a prime candidate for this procedure now too.  she is tired of sleeping in the sitting-position, and wonders about the aftermath about the surgery. . .being told presently that she will be on liquids only for two weeks after the suregery? are there any alternatives? Lee&Dalemarie

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Laura, Editor
4/29/08 4:16pm

Rahjcc,

 

Thanks for your question. There are a few resources on the site that may help answer your question.

 

In his latest post, Dr. Eisner, anwers common questions about surgery for reflux. In his answer he addresses the safety of Nissan Fundoplication surgery. Click here to read his post.

 

You may also want to refer to our community members post about her experience with laproscopic Nissan Fundoplication.

 

If anyone else can help please do!

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acid reflux, Community Member
6/16/08 10:30pm

can acid reflux cause you to cough

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Jennifer Rackley, Health Guide
7/11/14 9:25pm

Yes!  Acid reflux can definitely cause you to cough.  It can also trigger asthma attacks in some people.  If you find you are coughing frequently, have chest pain or wheezing have it evaluated by your physician.

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Cee, Community Member
7/18/08 2:37pm

I had this surgery Oct 2007. I am pleased. I was told depending on how tight the procedure is, will determine burping, and vomiting. I am able to burp, and have not needed to vomit, but I think I would be able to. Don't be concerned over the vomiting. The doctor can give you medication for this, should you have an upset stomach. Not sure which one, but it could be phenergan. Anyway, you should talk more with your doctor over your concerns. For me, I would have had it done in a heartbeat before now, but just kept putting it off. I now have Barrett's Esophagus after 29 yrs of acid reflux. I will be rechecked every year for the Barrett's with a endoscopy test. I do know there are some people that may not able to vomit or belch afterwards but the it is the doctor's hope that you will be able to. Your doctor should be able to give you more information on that. This surgery to me is more important than the ability to vomit, since there are medications available to  deter the vomiting. I wish you the best.

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nick, Community Member
1/16/09 1:02am

i had the procedure last year for a hiatal hernia and the resulting problem with my esophegus-i wont worry about burping and all-what you should worry about is whether you have an experienced surgeon-mine has been a painfull nightmare compliments of dr. buzzes in bend oregon-i will probably have to have it redone-it can very painfull if not done correctly

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bikesnrovers, Community Member
2/ 2/09 11:10am

I had the surgery about 6 1/2 years ago now. My life was terrible before surgery. Before surgery I was taking Nexium and that helped the acid, however, when I bicycled or did other activities I would feel like I was throwing up. My doctor called it "volume reflux."

 

Since the surgery I have recovered my active lifestyle and for the most part have been happy. It is the inability to throw up that has landed me in the hospital twice and the emergency room once. I now have perscription drugs that I carry with me when I travel to relieve the gas build up and pressure, should it happen again. It is still a rotten feeling but at least now I know I am not going to die... well, I knew that but at the time it felt that way.

 

 

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abassett73, Community Member
3/ 6/09 2:01am

I had this surgery 12 years ago and recovery was difficult but well worth it.  It changed my life.  I am not able to vomit.  I don't think it has been that big of an issue.  I have had maybe 5 times over the last 12 years where I wish I could have been able to vomit, mostly for drinking too much, which I almost never do as I don't really drink.  The best thing you can do is not put yourself into a situation like that.  Sometimes you have the flu and you can't control having to vomit.  You learn to deal with it.  You'll heave but nothing will come up.  

 

However, do some research on long term effects.  The internet was in it's infancy when I had this surgery and now you can find everything.  The problems I was having prior to surgery are starting to come back.  I wasn't told about this.  I thought this surgery would basically be a cure, and it was for the first 11 years.  Now I find out that after 10 years about 50% of the time the surgery will fail and may need to be done again.  If it comes to that, I would have it done again.

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Fundoplcation1999, Community Member
12/22/09 3:35pm

Hi

 

I had my surgery over 10 years ago - I am 25 years old and a Male.

 

I have been having issues the last few months but your message relates to me the best. I havent thrown up in the last 10 years, only gag reflex. I have been having really bad stomach aches and have been told its IBS.

 

I wanted to know if anyone else has had this type of situation.

 

Thanks so much!

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abassett73, Community Member
12/22/09 4:32pm

I just had an upper endoscopy last week.  They inflated a balloon in my esophagus to help open it up some more.  I won't know my official results until early January.  He did put down on some of the discharge paperwork that I have a hiatal hernia, but personally I don't think that is what's causing my food to lodge again.  

 

After having it so good for 11 years, I don't want go back to taking meds everyday.  I hope he has a better answer than that.

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JJ, Community Member
4/19/10 2:33pm

I had this surgery 22 years ago and have not had reflux since. I have heartburn once in a great while but not often. I cannot vomit and not been able to since the beginning. I still choke once in awhile on rice or mashed potatoes. They don't seem to want to go down at times. I too have IBS and have had since the surgery but all in all I am very pleased with the outcome. Is that???? other than that how was the play Mrs. Linclon?

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bethhasreflux, Community Member
4/10/11 11:27pm

I had this surgery done 16 or 17 years ago. I was 26 years old and now I am 43 soon to be 44. Life has been so wonderful without the aweful pain of my childhood and young adulthood! I too have not been able to vomit since. (no big deal.) but the sounds I make when I am dry heaving is horrifying. lol. I am feeling though in the past 3 years that it is comming back more and more with the pain of "reflux" again. I thought that I was alone until reading these posts! I had no idea we could have it redone! I would have it a million times to not have to feel the pain again! Has anyone had this done again that can give me some insight. thanks

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Judy, Community Member
12/17/11 3:34pm

I had a Nissan about 12 years ago and was in 7th heaven about how well it worked. No Gerd, no heartburn, nothing.  Then 2 years ago I started to get heartburn and started taking Nexium, it was great for a couple of years and then I started to get the loudest noises in my upper chest and terrible flatulance. Very dibilitating.  In the meantime I was having my regular endoscopies and it was obvious that it was coming undone. Finally the Doc. agreed to do another operation and it was nothing like a fundiplicationIt was a full on open your belly and he divided my stomach in thirds. One went up my esophagus, one became my stomach and one was attached to one of my intestines.  I can't remember if it was large or small intestinesso it seems to be good now but it only 5 months.  I think I read somewhere that the Nissan would onlast about 10 years.Judy 

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katldog, Community Member
6/ 8/11 12:46pm

quite a later response but sadly the surgery did not work for me.I had it over 7 years ago and am like I was before the surgery.    Before a year was over I was right back to having to take Prilosec twice a day.  PLUS I did end up in the ER room with a bad case of stomach problems and could not vomit.  I had forgotten about this side effect and it was pretty darn scary.  Wish it had worked, or I could vomit when sick...i guess kinda feel I lost all the way around ;-)

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JohnnyRebel, Community Member
11/12/12 10:18pm

I had a Nissen Fundo 15 years ago with complete and total long term success.

 

It is my understanding that the vast majority of "Nissen Failures" occur within the first two years, post-op. My surgeon told me that the stitches holding the wrap together and in place actually get stronger with age. 

 

If I was you, I would not worry that your fundo is destined for a redo based on how old it is.  

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Rita Macintire, Community Member
3/19/09 1:32pm

has anyone had this surgery recently? I am not sure this is what I want to have done any suggestions except being on Prevacid for the rest of my life. Its fustrating.

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Linda, Community Member
7/18/10 3:06pm

I had the surgery 5 yrs ago.   I had to live on ensure for 5 weeks after the surgery.  also lost some weight but Ive gained it back.  I tried everything before the surgery but nothing helped.  I also still had reflux after the surgery until I stopped drinking coffee.  It was making me sick every morning.  I loved it but couldnt deal with the sick feeling.  I cant throw up which is a big deal but I had some phenagan that stopped the sickness.   If you can do any thing, that will stopped the reflux, I would not recommend the surgery but I would have it if you have tried everything possible.  Im still taking prevacid.  Ive been on it for 10 yrs.

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brenda, Community Member
1/ 4/12 5:32pm

I had this surgery in September 2011 and just had to have it redone 2 weeks ago. The first 6 months were glorious.  I was able to eat foods I hadn't eatin in years and no reflux at all. Unfortunately my reflux burned my lungs and i have serious COPD because of it. When it started to return I didn't realize what was happening, I just knew my lungs were getting worse. I ended up having a critical care pulmonologist who basically told me he didn't know what to do because nothing was helping my lungs. I told him I was having some stomach issues and heartburn again and he sent me back to the surgeon who did my original Nissan. The surgeon was not at all happy about the fact that I was having the heartburn and sent me immediatly for the Bravo test, which came back normal. He then sent me for an upper GI, which showed a small hiatal hernia with some reflux. He really didn't want to re-do the Nissan surgery but since I was aspirating the stomach fluids and it was burning my lungs, they really had no choice. He had one of his partners in his practice re-do the surgery while he was also in attendance. I woke up with a feeding tube down my throat, which I did not have the first time. The whole experience has been dreadful. If this is what I have to look forward to in the future, I will not have this procedure re-done. The first Nissan recovery was not bad. This one, just awful. It's been two week since the surgery and I came home from the hospital on oxygen because my lungs are in such bad shape and I haven't had my first post-op visit yet, that's tomorrow. So, we will see what they say happened. I hope everyone else has better luck than I had. The vomiting, or lack there of for me, was so minimal compared to the amount of reflux and the damage I was doing. it is miserable not to be able to vomit, but the end result if you do is bad..  good luck everyone.

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Jamie, Community Member
6/25/12 10:56pm
I thought I was the only person who has experienced lung issues as well. I have copd due to years of aspiration because no doctor detected the gerd. Last year I underwent 4 nissen fundoplications and on the 4th one the doctor took it down as food was not passing through. Since then I've been diagnosed with Bronchiectasis a rare lung disorder. I found another surgeon who performed a toupet fundoplication 9 weeks ago. Sad to say 4 weeks after surgery I'm back on all my ppi medication and struggling once again with the pain of reflux. He says my next option is to remove 90 percent of my stomach in order for it to not produce acid. I'm a 40 year of female, never smoked don't drink and I'm about 5 foot 6 inches and 130 pounds. I don't know how I'll survive losing my stomach and still have no idea why all of this has happened to me.....if anyone has advice please e mail me at familysrus@hotmail.com. Sincerely, scared and alone. Reply
brenda, Community Member
6/27/12 1:09pm

Hi.. I am 6 months post surgery. I was sent to a different surgeon by my critical care pulmonologist. The surgeon he sent me to was one that specializes in repairing failed Nissens. After seeing him the first time he felt that I was aspirating bile and not stomach acid. After a multitude of tests that came back with trace amounts of acid.. he told me that he could completely redo my surgery and hope that it would be better but honestly, with every surgery the chance of success lessens. He also told me he could put a feeding tube in which is not something I want nor did he recommend it. He advised me to give more time for healing. If you are like me, and you probably are since you have the COPD as well, then you probably have oxygen problems. Having oxygen problems will cause slow healing. I am on oxygen full time now and have not been back to work since my surgery 6 months ago. I have to admit that the reflux has gotten better and after a CT of my lungs, the doctor told me that my lungs look better than they have in a year. There is no cure for COPD so it will never be gone, but as my critical care pulmonologist explained to me, if they can reduce my symptoms, I will feel much better. So far, I don't feel any better as far as my lungs go. I still feel that burning, tingling, bitter taste in my mouth a short time after eating. I have a lot of bloating and eat gas-x like crazy. I take one prescription strength prevacid twice daily. At my worst I was taking Aciphex plus multiple prilosecs daily and even eating tums like candy. I am no longer at the point where I have to throw up from the acid reflux, but I have to watch what foods I eat. So, in short, it does get better eventually...  the new surgeon did tell me that it would need to be re-done again at some point in the future.. they all do.. they come undone.. I have low blood pressure and I am difficult to bring out of anesthesia so I am now on an emergency only status for surgeries because of that. I cannot go back to work and am pretty much confined to my house now due to the sensitivities I have to smells (perfumes, lotions, smoke, cleansers, etc.). I can't be around people without having a massive asthma attack. The same goes for going into stores where there are any odors at all..  Also my immune system is so low that when I do manage to go in public, I catch every bug there is. I had the flu a month ago and not being able to throw up made that a miserable time.  Anyway.. don't give up, it will get better (hopefully for you)...  you just have to re-adjust your whole life when you have COPD..  it's not easy, but at least I'm alive.

 

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Jacosia, Community Member
8/23/13 1:27pm
Hi Brenda, I was diagnosed with severe Gord four years ago, and had the Nissan fundoplication shortly afterwards, I am in the same position as you now, very severe asthma triggered by perfumes, aftershave, tobacco particles and chemicals etc'. I have been in intensive care numerous times and been put on a ventilator twice after exposure to perfume at work. I have been off sick since Christmas now and have to spend most of my life indoors like you. Going out is like running through a minefield blindfold. My consultants are at a loss as to how to treat me, I just have to try and minimise risk of attacks by avoiding people wherever possible but even a change in temperature can set me off. I am convinced the reflux damaged my lungs somehow and left them hypersensitive to triggers. The worst thing is when you are rushed to hospital in the middle of a huge asthma attack and then being constantly approached by nurses wearing perfume it's a nightmare. The Nissan has also eft me unable to vomit at all, which is really scary when you catch a stomach bug, so I take anti sickness drugs at earliest sign of nausea now. It is interesting to know I am not alone with these symptoms, I have had to change my life 100 percent but anything is better than being intubated and constantly in icu. Keep strong. Jacosia Reply
brenda, Community Member
8/26/13 6:55pm

Hi Jacosia,

 

I just had gastric bypass surgery (roux-en-y) to stop the GERD. I had surgery on July 31st and was in ICU for two weeks following a complication with the feeding tube. Also, while performing the gastric bypass the surgeon found that I had an abcess on my stomach. I am not sure what that was from. Also he cleaned up a lot of scar tissue from previous surgeries. I wanted to tell you that last October 2012 I was sent to the National Jewish Respiratory hospital. They are in Denver Colorado and really helped nail down what was going on. Even though it took a long time, I hope that this last surgery was the one to fix it. My lungs are so damaged now that I am looking at needing a lung transplant in the future. Maybe you can get the referral from your doctor to go before your lungs are too damaged. The two Nissens I had, did absolutely nothing for me. Good luck!

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suffering, Community Member
3/21/09 12:02am

No surgery is safe. Surgery may be sucessful, but that doesn't make it safe.

 

My husband had this laproscopic surgery in 1999 to treat gerd and hiatal hgernia and continued to have all manner of complications, belching, hiccups, nausea, vomiting, acid reflux, pain, cramping, bowel problems, difficulty swallowing and breathing, cronic pain and fatigue, and diminishing "happiness". The surgery had to be redone non-laproscopically (he now has a foot long scar on his abdomen) in 2006. Apparently a step in the proceedure was not correctly the first time and his stomach had herniated through his diaphram.

 

He has continued to have complications since the second surgery. Everything listed above as well as having developed Dumping Syndrome, Gluten intolerance, and an inability to each much more than pureed foods. He can not bend nor place any pressure lighter than a shirt on his abdomen. He can not lay on his side. He cannot sleep through the night.

 

Oh, and all the meds designed to treat symptoms like nasuea or cramping tend to cause depression or anxiety. ANd all the meds to treat the pain cause nasuea and vomiting.

 

He is currently hospitalized for uncontrollable vomiting. His pain is unbearable.

 

This man did everything the doc ordered. He quit smoking and drinking. He eats a diet far healthier than most people could image. He is fit and works out to the best of his ability considering his constant stomach complications.

 

No one can tell us what is wrong with him. I suspect he has vagus nerve damage.

 

Please to anyone considering this surgery, pursue all other options. Spend more time on this internet looking into dietary treatments, manipulative therapies, and herbal medicines. This gentleman has found greater relief from herbal teas than from medications. Oh because of course medications cause stomach upset.

 

Spend more time looking into the complications that may result. Check out vagus nerve damage, and gateoparesis amoung others. Because even if they may be rare, you will not want to be one of the rare ones. I would wish this agony not upon mine enmy. Is agony safe? Hardly.

 

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suffering, Community Member
3/21/09 12:03am

No surgery is safe. Surgery may be sucessful, but that doesn't make it safe.

 

My husband had this laproscopic surgery in 1999 and continued to have all manner of complications, belching, hiccups, nausea, vomiting, acid reflux, pain, cramping, bowel problems, difficulty swallowing and breathing, cronic pain and fatigue, and diminishing "happiness". The surgery had to be redone non-laproscopically (he now has a foot long scar on his abdomen) in 2006. Apparently a step in the proceedure was not correctly the first time and his stomach had herniated through his diaphram.

 

He has continued to have complications since the second surgery. Everything listed above as well as having developed Dumping Syndrome, Gluten intolerance, and an inability to each much more than pureed foods.

 

Oh, and all the meds designed to treat symptoms like nasuea or cramping tend to cause depression or anxiety. ANd all the meds to treat the pain cause nasuea and vomiting.

 

He is currently hospitalized for uncontrollable vomiting. His pain is unbearable.

 

This man did everything the doc ordered. He quit smoking and drinking. He eats a diet far healthier than most people could image. He is fit and works out to the best of his ability considering his constant stomach complications.

 

No one can tell us what is wrong with him. I suspect he has vagus nerve damage.

 

Please to anyone considering this surgery, pursue all other options. Spend more time on this internet looking into dietary treatments, manipulative therapies, and herbal medicines. This gentleman has found greater relief from herbal teas than from medications. Oh because of course medications cause stomach upset.

 

Spend more time looking into the complications that may result. Look into vagus nerve damage, look into gastoeparisis. Look at your cancer risk. Because even if they may be rare, you will not want to be one of the rare ones. I would wish this agony not upon mine enmy. Is agony safe?

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Dennis, Community Member
3/25/09 1:25pm

After reading all the posts by people who have had this surgery, I am convinced that the most important aspect is to find a Dr. who is an expert. The Dr. who performed my surgery in 2003 is the head of the department at USC. Every patient there at that time was from out of state. They are taken to my Dr. from all over the country when their local Dr. does something wrong. My Dr. even told me the reason for failures is the Dr. takes a short cut, or forgets to do some minor little portion of the surgery. You need to choose an expert who performs this surgery many times a week, not just a few times a month. Otherwise you may end up with problems. When you take your car in for a brake job, do you want a guy who does brakes once or twice a month, or the guy who does brakes all day long? Same concept here.

 

Good luck. The surgery is great, with no side effects.

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Bruce Herbertson III, Community Member
6/14/09 10:09pm

I had the surgery in September 1998.  Since then I have not had to take an antacid or any proton pump inhibitors.  My GERD was so bad that I had to sleep sitting up because if would lay flat then what was in my stomach was coming out.  I had to go through several tests to determine which type of wrap they needed to do.  It was determined that I needed a full wrap.  My doctor informed me that I would have to have a tight wrap because the acid had almost completely burned away my LES.  He told me that after the surgery I would have some trouble belching for a while but that would subside and it has.  But I have found that an increase of flatulence.  He also informed me that I would probably never vomit again.  Since then my gag reflex has been tested several times and he was right.  I didn't vomit.  I would just dry heave.  A couple of times if the heaving didn't stop I did have to go to the ER.  These things I consider very minor and tolerable side effects, considering the pain and misery I was in before the surgery.  I am very happy and very satisfied with the results I got.  I have been GERD free since September 1998 and I no longer have to sleep sitting up.

If you have had GERD for many years and nothing has worked.  I would highly recommend this surgery.  It has literally been a life saver for me.

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jm, Community Member
11/11/10 1:12am

Dennis,

Could you do me a big favor and give me your Doctors name? I would really appreciate it !

Thank You

Jmeirndorf541@gmail.com

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Bell, Community Member
8/17/09 4:53pm

I had this surgery in Dec 06.  Burping no problem.  Vomiting is an issue at times.  You get the dry heaves bad and it is not fun.  But It has only happened about 4 times in almost three years.  THE BIG ISSUE that you need to be aware of and I found out the hard way is that your body is not always able to process B12 after this surgery.  B12 over the counter vitamins are also not well absorbed.  I took shots every other week for a year and now I take them monthly.  But I sure feel better.

 

Was it worth it.  Absolutely.  Your option is to continue to fight it and run the risk of esophageal (SP) cancer.  That was the road I was headed down.  I do not know how old you are but that is a horrible thing.  I can eat anything I want and a few things will still bother me.  (onion rings being the main one)

 

Good Luck to all

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Neese, Community Member
9/ 2/09 3:17pm

 My 19 year old son, who is Down Syndrome, had the surgery in 2006.  Every risk that could happen happened.  He threw a blood clot, had a perferation in his stomach, abscess under his diaphragm, collapsed lungs, and fluid in his lungs.  Now, 3 years later, an endoscopy and upper GI showed that his stomach has moved up around his esophagus, hour-glassed shaped, and he needs to have the surgery done again, his stomach pulled down and a piece of some type of material stitched in to keep his stomach from rising up around his esophagus.  Has anyone ever heard of this happening?  I know that people with special needs and neurological problems have higher risks of danger.   I asked to postpone the operation until near Christmas vacation and they suggested not to.  Does anyone know of doctors in the Boston area?  I'm in Maine and my son's gastrointestinal dr. is the best in Maine for children, so I'm assuming he has the best surgeons.  Any suggestions would help me immensely! 

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ccolmenares, Community Member
7/21/10 9:33am

I am very sorry to hear about your son. I had this procedure done in June 2009 by a laparoscopic specialist who "fixes other surgeon's surgeries", Dr. Fixit. I awoke from the operation to great pain that progressed. The dry heaves followed a bad reaction to morphine. After 3 days in the hosp and my condition worsening, they decided to "have a look". Over half my stomach had been pulled up throgh the diaphragm (herniated, as mentioned above) and lodged by the L lung. This 4.5 hour second surgery repaird things, but I returned home with pneumonia and the next 3 months learning to eat again. Lost 30 pounds. Sept '09 began with severe gas, diarrhea and the most awful burps that I became Mr. Unsociable. Was told by Dr. 2nd Opinion that surgery would fix me. No Way! Vagus nerve damage with gastroparesis, said another. Finally, some probiotics (S. boulardii) saved me! I have had 2 relapses into these symptoms that might last weeks, but they are usually cleared up with heavy probiotic doses. I typically cannot eat huge meals, and I cannot vomit any more (a terrible feeling with food poisoning!). I would have never had this surgery but remained on Nexium if I had received full discloser prior to the first operation.  So, yes, these severe complications occur. My second surgery saved my life. It was "almost catastrophic", Dr. Fixit said, but he had flatly refused to go back in until it was apparent that I was dying. Without strongly persisent self advocacy and a wife who kept meticulous records for a week in the hosp, I would not be here now. I hope you son regains some semblance of normalcy, and understands his suffering was not any blame of yours. I am very sorry for you! cCc

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Neese, Community Member
7/21/10 10:21am

Thanks for your response!  My son had his second surgery to correct the herniated stomach back in October '09 (which they undo the Nissan and redo it).  He had an endoscopy done in February '10 and although there was inflamation, the biopsies showed it wasn't Barrett's and less inflamed than before surgery.  He is back on Protonix as a back-up.  He does have stomach tissue in his esophagus, but still shows its not Barrett's Esophagus, which I am thankful for.  If this second surgery does not work out, they will insert a feeding tube to give his esophagus time to heal.  So far so good.  Sounds like you have been through quite a bit yourself and I wish you well in your recovery.  My son does not communicate (only by pointing to pictures) and never complains of pain, so we have to guess at just about everything, but we will do our best and try to be the best advocates for him.  Best of luck to you!  Neese

 

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Lynn, Community Member
9/19/09 5:08pm

I am in the same boat as you. My endoscopy showed ulcers in my esophagus. I have been on Nexium for years, but it's starting not to work all day long. My Dr. wants me to have this surgery. I could do Over the Counter H2 blockers (my health plan will not cover any of the good reflux medications), for the rest of my life, but that is expensive when you're taking it twice a day. I am at a point where there is no severe damage, except chronic refulx. This is probably the right time to do the surgery, but I hate having to do it, when it's seems like overkill....

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M&R&G, Community Member
11/17/09 12:00pm

rally

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JENN, Community Member
11/20/09 1:40am

Just had surgery on 11/12 10 years of the reflux and no sleeping and all around miserable finally took the step.  The testing was the worst part, my surgery was on Last thursday, I stayed over night, I was very sore in abdomen for about 3 days all very tolerable with meds.  I feel it is the best gift I have given myself.  I researched my Doctor and he made me very comfortable.  The soft Nissen diet right now isn't super fun, you really need to take small bites and only even think about eating half what you think you may want.  I had a small reaction to the meds and had to make a trip to ER but was sent home in about 2 hours.  If you really have tried the Gerd diets and proping your bed and are sick of throwing up everynight do it!

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Sue B., Community Member
7/22/10 12:28am

My son, who was born on 10/25/81, had this surgery when he was 13 weeks old, is now 29 years old. This was very much a life-saving surgery for him back then. The medical profession didn't know much about Gastroesphageal Reflux back then, & they also had several other diagnosis for what he had, but the Drs. who were on his case, very, very fortunately for us, called it exactly right for our son. No, he's not vomited since the day he had the surgery, but he burps with the best of anyone, & passes gas with the best of anyone as well. Sorry, but these are normal bodily functions that we are referring to. He's only in the past month or so been complaining about having some "heartburn," & we're now trying to figure out what the best solution to this problem for him would be. But for whomever has a problem of "heartburn," & has been diagnosed with Gastroesphageal Reflux, AND has seen a surgeon who does this type of surgery, AND has recommended this surgery for you, go for it!! 29 years ago, I cannot emphasize enough that it was a life-saving surgery for our son!!!queenbee

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Jean-Claude, Community Member
2/ 7/11 10:04pm

Hi there, Jean-Claude is my name and I live in Melbourne, Australia where I had me Nissan Fundoplication in 2000. I must say, the first five years was much better then ever! in mid 2006 I started ti get very sick and blowted very easily out of no particular reason what-so-ever. I have always suffered with severe stomach and kidney problems. Later on the year I was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and the situation go much worst. I remember very clear that I have lost so much wieght and then after about 4 years I have put so much wieght for no such reason at all.  Severe reflax is certainly back and I am very much contemplaiting to get Nissan Fundoplication done again some time this year 2011.  I can say that looking that the good points way over unsatisfatary condition that I am and have past from.

 

 

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bethhasreflux, Community Member
4/10/11 11:36pm

I had the surgery done in like 95 or 94. I think it was a life saver and life enhancer for me. but I too think I may need it again. I still dont throw up and burping doesnt always happen and es as we both know gas does happen more often with those of us that dont burb like others. lol. I am planning on looking into having this re-done. let me know what steps you have taken or if you have had it done again. I would love to know what to expect the second time around. thanks and good luck to you.

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JohnnyRebel, Community Member
7/ 6/14 12:04pm

I had my NF procedure done more than 16 years ago with perfect long-term success. Yes, NF surgery is safe, but not without risks even when performed by a highly experienced and expert surgeon. The results can be great and, I think, permanent if you do some research at your own end and get,

 

a skilled surgeon who:

 

1.) has excellent suturing and knot-tying skills

 

2.) knows how to correctly identify and isolate the stomach fundus

 

3.) uses only braided polyester suture materials in size 2-0 or 0. {not silk or nylon}

 

If you want a permanent "one-time" surgery, never accept a surgeon who tells you he will use silk or nylon sutures.  Both of these inferior materials lose 100 percent of their tensile strength within 12 months and are therefore subject to "failure" when stressed. 

 

I would bet that most of the "failures" I read about here at this site, occuring late in the game {after several years of reflux supression success} are the result of "suture stress failure" caused the surgeon's choice of silk or nylon sutures.  Only braided polyester sutures maintain 100 percent of their tensile strength, indefinately, in vivo. 

 

I expect my NF surgery, with braided polyester sutures, to last for the rest of my life-time without any "re-do" surgical procedure.

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By rahjcc, Community Member— Last Modified: 07/11/14, First Published: 04/29/08