Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Thursday, July 05, 2012 IrishJack32409, Community Member, asks

Q: Can GERD be the result of a citric acid intolerance?

I am just wondering if it is possible to have an intolerance to citric acid? I was diagnosed with GERD a few years ago after having recurring bouts of severe acid reflux. At the time I had tried treating it with Tums, which I found to only worsen my symptoms and could not determine any OTC or Rx medication to help (I tried just about everything). Over the years I started to notice that orange juice was the worst for making my GERD act up. I could have one glass of orange juice and the next day I would feel like my stomach was on fire and I would develop a sore throat and ulcers in my mouth. The same would happen if I ate an orange or a grapefruit but I never was much of a citrus fruit-eater so it took me a long time to notice the connection. Ever since noticing this, I have pretty much stopped consuming citrus all together, and actually my acid reflux hasn't been a major problem. Despite the fact that I am always stressed (generalized anxiety disorder), drink strong coffee regularly, and can generally eat spicy sauces without difficulty, my GERD symptoms have almost entirely disappeared. (I still have mild symptoms sometimes, but nothing really terrible or long-lasting.) The only thing that is different is that I no longer eat citrus fruit. Has anyone ever heard of such a thing happening before?
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Answers (2)
robichris, Community Member
7/ 5/12 5:40pm

GERD is the resuly of a weak lower esophageal sphincter rather than food intolerance.

 

A number of foods can stimuate excess acid.

Whereas most fruits are acidic, they actually reduce the acidity of the stomach - except for citrus fruits.

 

Although we are all different and respond to different foods in different ways, citric acid is one of those compounds that are most likely to produce excess acid. It won't cause reflux but the reflux will be more noticeable because of the strength of the acid.

 

Excess acid should be combatted with a PPI (eg omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, esomeprazole, dexlansoprazole). It may take a few days before you start noticing the difference.

If you experience acid reflux frequently, you need to have it checked by a doctor who may call for an endoscopy. It can cause Barrett's Rsophagus which is potentially pre-cancerous.

Reply
robichris, Community Member
7/ 5/12 5:41pm

GERD is the result of a weak lower esophageal sphincter rather than food intolerance.

 

A number of foods can stimuate excess acid.

Whereas most fruits are acidic, they actually reduce the acidity of the stomach - except for citrus fruits.

 

Although we are all different and respond to different foods in different ways, citric acid is one of those compounds that are most likely to produce excess acid. It won't cause reflux but the reflux will be more noticeable because of the strength of the acid.

 

Excess acid should be combatted with a PPI (eg omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, esomeprazole, dexlansoprazole). It may take a few days before you start noticing the difference.

If you experience acid reflux frequently, you need to have it checked by a doctor who may call for an endoscopy. It can cause Barrett's Rsophagus which is potentially pre-cancerous.

Reply
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By IrishJack32409, Community Member— Last Modified: 07/05/12, First Published: 07/05/12