My Checklist to Vote on November 4

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  • After the last two blogs, I'm hoping you are now really looking forward to your voting experience. This is the most important way you can have your say as a citizen. The following is a checklist that you can review and may want to take with you on Election Day.


    What to do on Election Day?

    • RECHECK YOUR REGISTRATION STATUS ON VOTE411.org BEFORE GOING TO THE POLLS
    • ARRIVE AT THE POLLING PLACE WITH ID If you are going to vote at your community polling place on November 4, make sure you have a picture ID such as driver's license with your current address or a phone or electric bill or paycheck with your address and name. If you have been notified in writing by your state election office of your voting precinct, bring that with you as well.
    • POLLING PLACES ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE A VISUAL EXAMPLE OF THE BALLOT FOR ELECTRONIC VOTING-REVIEW IT BEFORE GOING INTO THE VOTING BOOTH
    • IF YOU ARE A REGISTERED VOTER IN YOUR ELECTION DISTRICT AND YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO VOTE IN A FEDERAL ELECTION BUT YOUR NAME DOES NOT APPEAR ON THE OFFICIAL POLL LIST, YOU MAY VOTE BY PROVISIONAL BALLOT WHICH COVERS ONLY FEDERAL OFFICES SUCH AS PRESIDENT, VICE PRESIDENT, US SENATE AND US CONGRESS
    • REQUEST HELP IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS OR ARE UNABLE TO UNDERSTAND THE BALLOT OR ELECTRONIC VOTING MACHINE OR HAVE TROUBLE VOTING. Polling place workers are required to assist you with any difficulties in casting your ballot. Don't leave hanging chads and you may decide not to vote for a certain office and still have the rest of your votes count.
    • WHEN VOTING REVIEW YOUR COMPLETED BALLOT SEVERAL TIMES BEFORE HANDING THE BALLOT IN OR RECORDING YOUR VOTE ON THE ELECTRONIC VOTING MACHINEThe Election Protection Coalition, which includes the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Rock the Vote, the League of Women Voters of the United States (LWVUS), among many others, say they are prepared for the largest and most comprehensive election watch effort ever undertaken.

    For confidential nonpartisan voter services call the Election Protection Coalition hotline at 1-866-OUR-VOTE (and its Spanish counterpart 1-888-VEY-VOTA). The hotline's web component, 866ourvote.org (veyvota.org in Spanish) allows voters to share their polling place problems. On Election Day many local League of Women Voters offices (listed your local phone book) will provide same time phone advice.

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    Now that you have voted, you may want to join other citizens for an election night party or watch the returns on your local TV station. This election experience may have triggered you to become more involved with your local political process, become a poll worker in your local precinct, or to join any number of nonpartisan good government groups. You may even consider running for office yourself! At any rate, speak out for the rights of all citizens to be part of this important right and responsibility.

     

Published On: November 03, 2008