Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Monday, October 13, 2008 fiesty vic, Community Member, asks

Q: i think my 4 year old may have adhd and aspergers what symptons should i look for

my 4 year old son has recently changed nursery and both nurserys have shared concerns that he may suffer from aspergers. took him to doctors who thinks hes showing signs of adhd.

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Answers (5)
John G., Community Member
10/14/08 9:41am

Thanks for your question. You are on the right track by asking a doctor about what may be affecting your son. Here is some background to answer your question: The symptoms of Asperger's include abnormal nonveral communication, failure to develop peer relationships and inability to return social or emotional feelings. The symptoms of ADHD include hperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. I hope this helps.

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polly, Community Member
10/23/08 3:26am

As for adhd, look for hyperactivity.  Does he start one thing and not finish and go to another? Jump from things without finishing, does she fidget? have a hard time sitting still?

Also look for impulsivity.  on impulse w/out thinking before acting.  My daughter would have no concept of safety while walking down the street.  She would just bolt off and i would have to chase her down and catch her while i left my son on the sidewalk in his stroller.... tough times those were...

Aspergers?  Wait a minute... here:

 

Asperger’s syndrome is a developmental disorder in which people have severe difficulties understanding how to interact socially.

People with Asperger's syndrome have some traits of autism, especially weak social skills and a preference for sameness and routine. But unlike those with autism, children with Asperger's syndrome usually start to talk around 2 years of age (the age at which speech normally develops). They have normal to above-normal intelligence.

 

Symptoms

Although there are many possible symptoms of Asperger’s syndrome, the main symptom is severe trouble with social situations. Your child may have mild to severe symptoms or have a few or many of these symptoms. Because of the wide variety of symptoms, no two children with Asperger's are alike.

Symptoms during childhood

Parents often first notice the symptoms of Asperger's syndrome when their child starts preschool and begins to interact with other children. Children with Asperger's syndrome may:

  • Not pick up on social cues and lack inborn social skills, such as being able to read others' body language, start or maintain a conversation, and take turns talking.
  • Dislike any changes in routines.
  • Appear to lack empathy.
  • Be unable to recognize subtle differences in speech tone, pitch, and accent that alter the meaning of others’ speech. Thus, your child may not understand a joke or may take a sarcastic comment literally. Likewise, his or her speech may be flat and difficult to understand because it lacks tone, pitch, and accent.
  • Have a formal style of speaking that is advanced for his or her age. For example, the child may use the term “beckon” instead of “call,” or “return” instead of “come back.”
  • Avoid eye contact.
  • Have unusual facial expressions or postures.
  • Be preoccupied with only one or few interests, which he or she may be very knowledgeable about. Many children with Asperger's syndrome are overly interested in parts of a whole or in unusual activities, such as doing intricate jigsaw puzzles, designing houses, drawing highly detailed scenes, or astronomy.2
  • Talk a lot, usually about a favourite subject. One-sided conversations are common. Internal thoughts are often verbalized.
  • Have delayed motor development. Your child may be late in learning to use a fork or spoon, ride a bike, or catch a ball. He or she may have an awkward walk. Handwriting is often poor.
  • Have heightened sensitivity and become overstimulated by loud noises, lights, or strong tastes or textures. For more information about these symptoms, see sensory integration dysfunction.

Although the condition is in some ways similar to autism, a child with Asperger's syndrome typically has normal to advanced language and intellectual development. Also, those with Asperger's syndrome typically make more of an effort than those with autism to make friends and engage in activities with others.

Symptoms during adolescent and teen years

Most symptoms persist through the teen years, and although teens with Asperger's can begin to learn those social skills they lack, communication often remains difficult. They will probably continue to have difficulty "reading" others' behaviour.

Your teen with Asperger's syndrome (like other teens) will want friends but may feel shy or intimidated when approaching other teens. He or she may feel "different" from others. Although most teens place emphasis on being and looking "cool," trying to fit in may be frustrating and emotionally draining for teens with Asperger's. They may be immature for their age and be naive and too trusting, which can lead to teasing and bullying.

All of these difficulties can cause teens with Asperger's to become withdrawn and socially isolated and to have depression or anxiety.3

However, some teens with Asperger's syndrome are able to make and keep a few close friends through the school years. Some of the classic Asperger's traits may also work to the benefit of your teen. Teens with Asperger's are typically uninterested in following social norms, fads, or conventional thinking, allowing creative thinking and the pursuit of original interests and goals. Their preference for rules and honesty may lead them to excel in the classroom and as citizens.

Symptoms in adulthood

Asperger's syndrome is a lifelong condition, although it tends to stabilize over time, and improvements are often seen. Adults usually obtain a better understanding of their own strengths and weaknesses. They are able to learn social skills and how to read others' social cues. Many people with Asperger's syndrome marry and have children.

Some traits that are typical of Asperger's syndrome, such as attention to detail and focused interests, can increase chances of university and career success. Many people with Asperger's seem to be fascinated with technology, and a common career choice is engineering. However, scientific careers are by no means the only areas where people with Asperger's excel. Indeed, many respected historical figures have had symptoms of Asperger's, including Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Albert Einstein, Marie Curie, and Thomas Jefferson.

Other conditions

Many children with Asperger's syndrome also have coexisting conditions and may have symptoms of these conditions as well. They include:

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Anxiety disorder.
  • Depression, especially in adolescents.
  • Non-verbal learning disorder.
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
  • Social anxiety disorder.  
I got this info off of http://www.bchealthguide.org/kbase/topic/mini/zq1008/symptoms.htm
When my daughter was first in the process of being diagnosed she presented a lot of these symptoms however all the specialists don't think she has aspergers now.  She also has a lot of sensory issues which they've diagnosed as sensory processing disorder which also shares similar traits to those of aspergers.  She has not been given a full diagnosis as of yet however, she has seen a psycho educational therapist, an occupational therapist, and a speech and language pathologist.  Now i am just waiting for the follow up appointment.  Personally, after re-reading all of this information, I still lean toward aspergers myself.... i'm no doctor but everything in this category is clearly suited to my daughter...
Hope that helps... =)

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Aspie, Community Member
5/28/09 6:38pm

Hi!

I have Asperger's myself, but I don't have ADHD, but my father has ADHD, but doesn't have Asperger's.

Although I think there are many children who have comorbid AS and ADHD.

They may have symptoms of Asperger's, and ADHD as well.

 

I advice you to read about symptoms of ADHD and Asperger's, think about it and then go with your child to a specialist and discuss about which of these disorders your 4 year old son may hhave. It's good to take some literature with you, anyway. It might help.

 

You must be careful about a specialist knowledge, because some doctors don't even know for Asperger's, so I advice you to go to a specialist who has ever worked with Aspies.

 

There a problem shows, cuz Asperger Syndrome is very likely misdiagnosed somethimes, when it's allmost "new" syndrome, and many people have never heard for it yet.

 

The biggest difference between ADHD and Aspie child is that ADHD child can never concentrate well, even if he is very interested in that thing or subject. Despite of that, an Asperger's child usually can't concentrate, but when the thing he does is interesting he might concentrate well.

 

Read some literature about differences between the two, and check out which signs your child really shows.

Don't allow your child to be misdiagnosed, it's very important!

 

Hope that helps ;-)

 

All good,

 

Aspie

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Annie, Community Member
2/10/10 12:35pm
  • Does the child find it impossible to sit still, when such behaviour is expected?
  • Does the child lose or forget everything, consistently?
  • Does the child find it impossible to take their turn for anything, for example blurting out answers without waiting to fully hear questions, snatching toys or lashing out when expected to wait?
  • Is the child easily distracted by sights and sounds that are irrelevant to the task or activity that they should be concentrating on?
  • Does the child skip from one task to another without completing anything?
  • Does the child find it difficult to pay attention to detail, and often make careless mistakes?
  • Reply
    Annie, Community Member
    2/10/10 12:37pm
  • Does the child find it impossible to sit still, when such behaviour is expected?
  • Does the child lose or forget everything, consistently?
  • Does the child find it impossible to take their turn for anything, for example blurting out answers without waiting to fully hear questions, snatching toys or lashing out when expected to wait?
  • Is the child easily distracted by sights and sounds that are irrelevant to the task or activity that they should be concentrating on?
  • Does the child skip from one task to another without completing anything?
  • Does the child find it difficult to pay attention to detail, and often make careless mistakes?
  • Reply
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    We hope you find this general health information helpful. Please note however, that this Q&A is meant to support not replace the professional medical advice you receive from your doctor. No information in the Answers above is intended to diagnose or treat any condition. The views expressed in the Answers above belong to the individuals who posted them and do not necessarily reflect the views of Remedy Health Media. Remedy Health Media does not review or edit content posted by our community members, but reserves the right to remove any material it deems inappropriate.

    By fiesty vic, Community Member— Last Modified: 03/29/14, First Published: 10/13/08