medications

New Technology Talks You Through an Anaphylaxis Emergency

Kathi MacNaughton Health Pro February 13, 2013
  • Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening, severe allergic reaction to some type of allergen. I wrote about this condition in my Anaphylaxis & You - What You Need to Know post a few years back.

     

    Immediate treatment is essential in preventing death or even less dire results. The treatment of choice is injectable epinephine. The original device for this was something called an Epi-Pen, a small pen-shaped syringe that a non-medical person could use to give a quick dose of life-saving epinephrine, even through clothing, if necessary. 

     

    A few years later, a second version of injectable epinephrine was released, called Twin-Ject. It boasted the improvement of a second dose of epinephrine in the same device, just in case a follow up injection should be needed for severe anaphylaxis.

     

    Now there is something possibly even better. You've heard of Siri, of Apple iPhone fame, who will supposedly answer your questions, help you find information or even make suggestions? Or perhaps you've taken CPR training and used an AED device, which talks you through diagnosis of heart rhythm problems and defibrillation to restart a malfunctioning heart?

     

    Welcome to the future! Now there is an autoinjectable form of epinephrine that will talk you through its use. Auvi‑Q™ has voice instructions that talk you through each step of the injection process. It's a compact little device, smaller than a deck or cards or your iPhone. You activate it by sliding the cover off, and then, just follow directions.

     

    Anyone can use it, even without training. And like previous devices, it can be injected right through clothing. Despite the technology, though, it is still essential that you seek emergency care immediately after giving the injection!

     

    For more information, visit the official website: http://www.auvi-q.com/

     

    The BEST Treatment for Anaphylaxis

     

    Keep in mind, though, that the best treatment for anaphylaxis will always be prevention! I wrote this post on what you need to know about anaphylaxis for your kids. But the principles apply equally to adults. I highly recommend you check out that post. Your life -- or someone else's -- could depend upon it.