Thursday, September 18, 2014

Friday, July 25, 2008 Don, Community Member, asks

Q: What can I do to get formaldehyde allergy relief?

I get an allergic reaction to everything made with formaldehyde.  My skin cracks, itches, etc.  How can I get relief?

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Answers (17)
JB, Editor
8/20/08 12:07pm

There's lots of things you can do to get relief from an allergy, but one of the most important things you can do is to stay away from the things you are allergic to.

 

Also, keep in mind the formaldehyde is possible carcinogen (a carcinogen is a substance that can cause cancer), so you should try that much harder to avoid it whenever possible.

 

The EPA says this about formaldehyde: "Formaldehyde, a colorless, pungent-smelling gas, can cause watery eyes, burning sensations in the eyes and throat, nausea, and difficulty in breathing in some humans exposed at elevated levels (above 0.1 parts per million). High concentrations may trigger attacks in people with asthma. There is evidence that some people can develop a sensitivity to formaldehyde. It has also been shown to cause cancer in animals and may cause cancer in humans. Health effects include eye, nose, and throat irritation; wheezing and coughing; fatigue; skin rash; severe allergic reactions."

 

Be sure to carefully read labels of any products that you normally use or come in contact with. The EPA also offers a list of tips for reducing your level of exposure to formaldehyde, which is commonly found in housing and building materials.

 

As for itchy skin, many over-the-counter hydrocortisone creams should provide itch relief (but be sure to read the label, because I don't think you can put the cream on broken skin).

 

If you're concerned at all about your reactions, then you should see your doctor.

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Andromeda, Community Member
1/13/10 10:54pm

It's almost impossible to avoid formaldehyde.  It won't always be listed as an ingredient in personal care products, or it will be listed under another name, or it won't become actual formaldehyde until it's broken down in the human body -- so you're clueless, as well as defenseless, unless you find knowledgable physicians at the outset.

 

I'm amazed (and grateful) to find that I'm not an extreme minority, as my health-care providers had me pegged. They also proposed that I was mentally unstable and that my symptoms (skin and pulmonary) were psychosomatic, and one hospital social worker wrote in my chart that my facial lesions and scars were self-inflicted.  They tested me for illegal drugs (negative).  Although Presnisone had been prescribed and proved effective for severe facial swelling in the past, since I'd lost my health ins, I was forced to rely upon the only medical facility I could afford and these practitioners refused to prescribe it.  When none of their allergy tablets and topical ointments relieved my symptoms, I was finally given the Presnisone Taper-Pak, too little, too late.  The swelling subsided but the open sores on my face did not.  A year and a half later, the initial symptoms have faded (most of my exposure to formaldehyde, I later found out, was on the job, and I've been away from it for seven months now), but I've been battling an opportunistic, secondary infection.  I was given only topical medication (to which I was allergic!), was refused a referral to an occupational health clinic (the clinic required a physician's referral), was maligned and villified and written off as a nut case.  (I can back up these statements -- I've seen the records)

 

Sorry -- I was supposed to "reply," and all I'm doing is telling my story of horrific mistreatment.  As to what you can do to get relief, I've only told you what not to do.  There's so much information on this website, I wish I'd had access to it years ago.  My quest for information began when the occasional allergic reaction became chronic and severe, and a company supervisor clued me in as to the probable cause.  And yes, it is rare for someone to react so severely, but it does happen once in awhile.  Formaldehyde allergy, or "sensitivity," is recognized by the CDC, ATSDR, OSHA, NIOSH, among others, including the Social Security Administration, which recognizes its as potentially disabling.  Some members of the AMA, however, are still out to lunch (or in orbit).  Sorry, I had to get in that one dig in retaliation for their inhumane and insensitive treatment of my case. 

 

I trust I will recover, no thanks to them.  They're not the only game in town, and I've finally begun to get the help and treatment that, given in a timely manner, would've prevented scars, heartache, and loss of income.  I'm not a quitter, and all's well that ends well.  Bottom line lesson to be learned:  if you don't trust your doctor, trust your gut and don't stop until you get the help you know you deserve.

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e carlyle, Community Member
7/11/11 10:59pm

i work in a office where they put down new carpet, my eyes swell shut every time i walk in there. i was off work for 14 days and my eyes cleared up and now im back and the first day my eyes are stinging. is there a test for formaldehyde concentration

 

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frida630, Community Member
2/10/12 3:36pm

Hi,

I am going through something similar.  I do hair and I was using the Brazilian blowout treatment.  I have been battling this rash for 2 years plus.  It goes away and comes back.  I am now taking time off to let my body heal.  How is your rash?  Did you have any redness?  

 

 

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mr.boss, Community Member
1/ 5/13 3:40am

I've had same probs with my doctors who look at me like some kind of hypochondriac which is very belittling, from experience i have found that i personally know more about the conditions i go to my doctors about than they actually do, without trying to sound big headed but it is a sad fact. Many GP's in UK do not have specialist knowledge in these areas(as far as i am aware), at least it doesn't seem like they do and trying to find an allergy specialist for me is proving very difficult, the most i got was a skin test by nurses at local hospital.

 

I'm now embarrased to even mention my allergy symptoms to my doctors as i know what they will say or imply and i don't want to give them the excuse... i've lost all faith in my local health service over the past 3-4years.

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CAveman, Community Member
2/ 6/13 7:11pm

Hi Andromeda, Sounds from your name that you are in Orbit. Andromeda is my favorite constellation and the Nebula is fantastic..... Sorry to hear of your troubles.

 

I was very severely chemically poisoned in 1993, so bad everyone thought I would die for the first 3 or 4 years. I spent about $ 1 million out of my own pocket, on medical care of every kind, as the health care system does not recognise poisoning by chemicals. Only a tiny minority of Doctors (worldwide) had any clue about chemical poisoning and chemical sensitivity. I had treatment from Drs in US, Canada, England and Germany. However, even this tiny number of Doctors kept me alive, just about, but even they were unable to get me well again.

 

But just about every other Doctor doubted my sanity, or worse.

 

One bright spark of a Doctor, an Occupational Doctor no less, told me:

 

"Mr Caveman, poisonous chemicals are NOT poisonous, they are entirely safe... The symptoms you are suffering from are imaginary... you are depressed! Take this anti-depressant pill"

 

Later, he corrected himself... "Mr Cavemen, Poisonous chemicals are NOT poisononous, they are ABSOLUTELY SAFE".. The symptoms you are suffering from are very real to you, but they do NOT EXIST.... you are suffering from DELUSIONS. You have a serious Psychriatric illness.... take this ANTI-DELUSIONAL pill, three times a day for the next .... 35 years and you will be PERFECTLY OK. This is SCIENTIFIC MEDICINE!!" By that time he was shouting at me, and continued shouting for the next 3/4 hour.

 

WOW!  Years later, I heard from a family Dr. when this Family Dr wanted to send a chemically poisoned patient to him.... He called her back, to say that all the patients he had seen over the past 20 years, unfortunately all of his supposed "Scientific Medicine" had failed to work in any patient at all, and he really did not know what to do, at all.  Yet he made a ton of money from Insurers and Workers Compensation. Did he ever correct the terrible harm he caused.. no. Pretty sad.

 

Anyway, Andromeda, you defintely still have your marbles.

 

Formaldehyde sensitivity (it is not really an allergy, as Allergies are mediated by IGE: Immune Globulin E, to foreign proteins, like in peanuts). The problems of chemical sensitivity, in my book, are just the tip of the iceberg. The iceberg underwater is a whole ton of toxic chemicals stored (sequestered) in the tissues of the body. When Formaldehyde comes along, it locks into the surface of your cells and alters the surface chemistry of the outside walls of your body cells, so that the Immune System thinks the affected cells are "NON-SELF" as the Immune system  only looks at the surface of the cells.

 

Then the Immune system goes to war, to try its best to destroy these "Foreign" cells. But these cells are 99.99% "you" and only 0.01% "foreign" chemicals. Hence rashes and pain, as the immune system tries its best to destroy the cells that look as they are "NON-YOU".

 

In the end, after a ton of money spent on tests and vitamins etc, and still being in beyond suicidal pain and unable to function at all...I found out about Coffee Enemas. That was in 1997.

 

For 6 months, I carried on with the Intravenous vitamins and so on, spending over 6,000 $ a month and the pain and inability to think, but did not try a coffee enema, as I was sure they would not work. One day, I was so bad, that I told my long suffering wife, that I would commit suicide, as I could stand the pain and suffering no more. She went out and promptly drove the car into a line of traffic at a stop light, wrecking 4 cars in the process. She was at the point of breaking, from my suffering.

 

When she told me of the accident, I thought that I had to do something, or else I would die (either just die, or by suicide) and she likely would die too, from looking after me. So what to do?? I had tried everything, with no luck, I was dieing.

 

So I thought I would try a coffee enema, as I had tried everything else.

 

To cut a long story short, within about 90 seconds of "plugging in " the enema tube in my rear end, my terrible pain went, I could think again and instead of crying, tears and the moaning and groaning, I was laughing! Incedible.

 

So, being a Research scientist (a Geophysicist), I started to research what it took to make a good coffee for Enema use. After 500+ Coffees later and 15 years later, research with a Biochemist and also a Toxicologist, I have come up with something that works well.

 

At present, I sell this coffee just to friends, not as a business yet.

 

Andromeda: Send me your address to: Lochend Clinique, RR2, Cochrane, Alberta, Canada T4C 1A2 and I will send you, at no charge, what you need to give it a try and the instructions plus the precautions to observe. 

 

The technical details: Boiled coffee that is not rancid and does not contain toxic chemicals and has a good profile of essential minerals and other substances, has a small amount of two Palmitic Fatty acids, Cafestol Palmitate and Kaweol Palmitate. These cause the enzyme system " Glutathione Sulphur Transferase" (GST) to upregulate in the liver and Kidneys, plus elsewhere in the gut and lungs.

 

The Caffeine in coffee causes Phase I detox to upregulate. The GST then binds to Chlorinated hydrocarbons (pollutants) directly and also makes Reduced L Glutathione  (GSH) to "up-regulate" (increase) in the body. GSH binds to the metabolites from Phase I and then the toxins bound to GSH in the Phase II process, can now leave the body via the "rear end".

 

Many people who are very toxic, have a heavy load of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons, which stay in the body, more or less, forever. They block the body's ability to deal in a normal manner with irritant chemicals such as Formaldehyde in a civilised manner, without all those rashes and pain.

 

Now unlike the prescription drugs, which just paper over the cracks, Coffee enemas help the body to get rid of stored toxins. Now it is a VERY good idea to be under the care of a Doctor, or another Health Professional, like a skilled nurse, at least to stop you doing something stupid. You do need professional advice, if you can afford it.

 

Getting rid of Toxins is not at all pleasant sometimes, especially if you detoxify too rapidly. You re-live the same symptoms you had when you accumuated these toxins in the first place. It will likely take a long time too, but coffee enemas are cheao and give you back control of pain and ... your life too. But hopefully, you are not as toxic as I was in 1993. Coffee enemas were the cheapest of all that I tried, the easiest and ulimately, the way I returned to the land of the living, instead of being with two feet in my grave.

 

Best wishes

 

Caveman

 

 

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mimi33706, Community Member
12/15/13 6:14am

Dear Caveman,

Are you serious?? PLease tell me that this is not a joke because desperate people will consider desperate measures to alleviate the unbearable itching from eczema. My husband cannot find relief. He was bitten by a parasite in January 2013 and treated with Permethrin cream (1% formaldehyde) he had a horrible reaction and developed an extreme sensitivity/allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasing agents. He has been treated with Prednisone, Triamcinolone, Singulaire, Allegra, Benadryl but these medications only provide TEMPORARY symptom relief and have terrible side effects. Avoidance of the allergens is not realistic because they are virtually EVERYWHERE. Soaps, detergents, cosmetics, moisturizers, medicines, fabrics, furniture, leather, etc etc etc. Basically anything you touch with an extended shelf life has been treated with these preservatives. The most maddening part of an avoidance strategy is that the product labeling is so deceptive. Manufacturers will claim "formaldehyde free" when they actually put formaldehyde releasing agents in their products. Or they list unrecognizable synonyms or chemical names for formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasing agents. It may be legal but it certainly is immoral!! So, are you serious????      

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Kathleen, Community Member
9/24/08 11:39pm

After 18 months of a feeling lousy and having a mystery rash, a patch  test finally proved I am allergic to formaldehyde. (Dec. 2007)

Products: There are 'safe' products. I only use Cetaphyl wash and lotion - vaseline works too. I use Aveda rosemary mint shampoo.

Clothes and materials: These are another problem. I can't wear anything that has been sprayed with formaldehyde and most things have been sprayed (including orgainic cotton and hemp that I've bought). I limit my materials to acrylic, acetate, and nylon. This is tough, but it's been a year and I'm finding sources.  I can find acrylic sweaters and skirts - pants are tough.The LLBean nylon pants with the zipper that turns them into shorts are 'safe' except for the zipper. (Note: acrylic, acetate, and nylon do not absorb. I wash everything in ammonia when I bring it home from the store. It hasn't ruined anything, yet.) This from someone who used to wear all natural fibers!

Furniture and cars: Anything that is material is probably sprayed with formaldehyde. I have an acrylic blanket that I keep handy, but you might ride in someone's car or have a business meeting and find a few days later you have the rash. 

Bed sheets: I found cotton/bamboo sheets that are 'safe' but went back to buy more and the newer products do give me a rash. Guess the formaldehyde distributor's got another new contract. I use my own sheets at hotels.

Until formaldehyde use is legislated I think folks like us will have problems.

It's been a year. My life is simpler - after all I have very few products and very few clothes. No fashion diva here! I still have flare ups, but can usually trace it back.

Good luck to you.

 

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inga, Community Member
1/21/10 9:10am

hi there ,thank you for your info ,i have severe allergys to clothes ,so just wash them in how much ammonia ,and then after ,could you please give me instruction ,need relief all my clothes mostly  set me off ,i buy in the second hand store but after washing them in hot water still mkaes my skin burn and chest ,thank you for any help :)

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inga, Community Member
1/26/10 8:53am

hi there ,how can i make clothes work for me ,where can i find arcylic ,acelate nylon clothes ,i have problems with shoes and boots too ,can you help with sources?i love free and clear shampoos ,google it ,and lavanila deodorantand parfum free off all stuff ! thank you for any help

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churchsec, Community Member
10/19/11 6:27pm

What kind of makeup do you use? I have been fighting a reaction in both eyes to formaldehyde in some mascara I used. I've used prednisone and erythomyacin cream for a bacterial infection and impetigo in the open sores on my eyelids. Hope you can help!

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connie, Community Member
3/16/13 11:25pm

all of mary kay products are formaldehyde free

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wendywhitehouse, Community Member
11/14/13 7:26pm

BEWARE!! Not true. Mary Kay contains formaldehyde in many  of their products and for someone with a severe sensitivity like me it can leave me with facial lesions that last for months. Mary Kay is not safe for people allergic to formaldehyde!!!!

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Faith, Community Member
6/13/14 1:16pm

I use mabelline great lash in black, it is the only mascara that does not cause irritation.

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churchsec, Community Member
10/19/11 6:27pm

What kind of makeup do you use? I have been fighting a reaction in both eyes to formaldehyde in some mascara I used. I've used prednisone and erythomyacin cream for a bacterial infection and impetigo in the open sores on my eyelids. Hope you can help!

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Doobie's Mom, Community Member
1/19/13 6:17pm

My immune system suddenly started reacting after a knee replacement.  Allergy testing yeilded allergy to formaldehyde, yellow gold, and process blue #106 and 124.  As far as mascara, everything was making my eyes swell like a prizefighter.  after reserching online and reading all the other names formaldehyde releasing agents go by, I discovered Pur Minerals big blink mascara at ULTA.  no problems, also use their mineral melt eye makeup remover, pencil eye liner, and their foundation.  Mary Kay cream blush and cream eye shadows.  The only soap Iuse on my face, body, hair and dishes is Dr. Brommers.  carried at Krogers in the natural section and at whole foods. 

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connie, Community Member
3/17/13 12:07am

I am currious about you knee replacement because my mom went down hill after hers and she die recently of heart complications. I am serverly allergic to famaldahyde and wonder now that I read your artical if she might have been too. Her implants were from a company that recently had a national recall of there products as well. Those combinations make my family think that her death was related to her knee surgery and the implants they put in.

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wendywhitehouse, Community Member
11/14/13 7:30pm

There is a great mascara made from volcano ash that is safe and works FABULOUS! Check reviews on mascaras before committing since many of the formaldehyde free brands run like water! :) I wish I could tell you the name but Google volcano ash mascara... ALWAYS ask is it is free of even traces of formaldehyde. :)

 

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connie, Community Member
3/16/13 11:22pm

 am curious what your symptoms were, I have tested positive for having a formaldehyde allergy and have developed fatigue, stiffness and pain all the time to the point it has changed every aspect of my life. I love to be active and now my workouts are excruciating and it is hard to perform my job. I am so exhausted all the time and they say it is fibro myalgia but it makes me wonder if it is the exposer to formaldehyde. I have had to take allergy pills since ninth grade because my allergy to formaldehyde is so bad even thought it was not until just a few years ago the that my dermatologist figure out what my allergy was. Before that they just were treating the symptoms because they could not figure out what was cause of the symptoms. However even after we figure out what it was allergist often tell me that my nasal symptoms could not possibly be from a skin allergy so they take me off allergy meds and give me Sudafed only for my nasal passages to become so congested that I cannot breath through them; then I get a sinus infection and bronchitis before they finally believe that my symptoms to formaldehyde are that severe and put me back on my allergy pills.

 

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connie, Community Member
3/16/13 11:22pm

 am curious what your symptoms were, I have tested positive for having a formaldehyde allergy and have developed fatigue, stiffness and pain all the time to the point it has changed every aspect of my life. I love to be active and now my workouts are excruciating and it is hard to perform my job. I am so exhausted all the time and they say it is fibro myalgia but it makes me wonder if it is the exposer to formaldehyde. I have had to take allergy pills since ninth grade because my allergy to formaldehyde is so bad even thought it was not until just a few years ago the that my dermatologist figure out what my allergy was. Before that they just were treating the symptoms because they could not figure out what was cause of the symptoms. However even after we figure out what it was allergist often tell me that my nasal symptoms could not possibly be from a skin allergy so they take me off allergy meds and give me Sudafed only for my nasal passages to become so congested that I cannot breath through them; then I get a sinus infection and bronchitis before they finally believe that my symptoms to formaldehyde are that severe and put me back on my allergy pills.

 

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connie, Community Member
3/16/13 11:27pm

  I am curious what your symptoms were, I have tested positive for having a formaldehyde allergy and have developed fatigue, stiffness and pain all the time to the point it has changed every aspect of my life. I love to be active and now my workouts are excruciating and it is hard to perform my job. I am so exhausted all the time and they say it is fibro myalgia but it makes me wonder if it is the exposer to formaldehyde. I have had to take allergy pills since ninth grade because my allergy to formaldehyde is so bad even thought it was not until just a few years ago the that my dermatologist figure out what my allergy was. Before that they just were treating the symptoms because they could not figure out what was cause of the symptoms. However even after we figure out what it was allergist often tell me that my nasal symptoms could not possibly be from a skin allergy so they take me off allergy meds and give me Sudafed only for my nasal passages to become so congested that I cannot breath through them; then I get a sinus infection and bronchitis before they finally believe that my symptoms to formaldehyde are that severe and put me back on my allergy pills.

 

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Skyyblues, Community Member
11/17/08 11:08pm

I have the same problem.  I had it pretty much under control until I had some dental work recently and my hands started to flare up again.  Now everything is effecting them and they are steadily getting worse.  I wear white cotton gloves when I go anywhere and at work to limit what I touch.  This worked last time and I cleared up really good.  An occaisional flare up but no cracking and such.  I had to be very careful of creams for itch as most contain formaldehyde and I am also allergic to petroleum.  I use a lot of Burt's Bees products and other organic soaps, etc.  Still have to really read the labels as a lot of "all natural" products still contain releasers and such.  I spent about 9 months on prednisone.  Wow not a good drug!!  I also took 3 different allergy pills, 2 am and 1 pm.  I weaned myself off of everything and was doing really good till now.  Look for a natural hand/body cream, keep your hands clean and dry and good luck!  I can't believe I finally found people like me.  I buy a lot of clothes at second hand stores and wash them 2 times in hot water before wearing which helps also.  Good news for my pocket book I will never own a new car, want new furniture, new carpet or pretty much anything new again!!Cool

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Tracey, Community Member
7/28/09 1:59am

Hi,

I have just found out I am allergic to Formaldehyde after having skin problems for the last 2 years. You mentioned about Prednisone being a "Bad Drug" I understand it's a steriod so not good to start with but what makes you say that? Have you had any side affects from taking it?

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JR, Community Member
2/ 1/12 3:02pm

I have been using Triamcinolon cream for the past 30 years after being told I have a formaldhehyde allergy. Short term use of prednisone should be ok, but you don't want to use it long term. The side affects will be worse than the allergy. I have had only one serious bout in 30 years & that was self inflicted. Sitting in a hotel hot tub filled with chemicals is not a good idea. Another solution is sitting in a tub filled with Aveeno oatmeal. Sounds gross, but it does control the itching.

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eac, Community Member
1/31/13 2:53pm

Do you know of a toilet paper without formaldehyde?  This is my problem area.

 

 

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Formallegen, Community Member
5/31/14 6:33pm

Marcal seems to be ok. But as its recycled you might get a twinge here and there since the paper before they process it might've had formaldehyde in it. CVS Total Home (not the recycled) was how I stumbled upon a solution to nearly 7 months of UTIs and Yeast infection symptoms. Im afraid to try any others at the moment, but seventh generation paper towels have been great so maybe their TP is good too. Charmin replied to an inquiry of mine saying that they use no formaldehyde in any of their processing. 

Also worthy of note is that formalehyde occurs naturally, in minute amounts, within wood pulp. Which gets turned into toilet paper. Usually enough of it is washed out by the end result that this natural amount won't really affect you. 

Best of Luck, I know its a struggle.
 

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wendywhitehouse, Community Member
11/14/13 7:33pm

70 lbs of weight gain and a bad attitude were my symptoms! :/

 

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inga, Community Member
1/20/10 2:03pm

i'm blonde with dark roots ,also need too find shoes ,please help :)

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DEBBIE, Community Member
2/ 4/10 6:56am

WinkHEY HAVE JUST COME FROM A DERMOTOLOGIST ?  AND HEY HAVE WHAT YOU HAVE...AND I AM STARTING TO THINK ITS THE DENTAL WORK   I HAD ROOT CANAL DONE IN JULY AND CAME OUT WITH THIS HORRIBLE ITCHY SCALY YUK RASH   READING ABOUT IT TODAY I DECIDED I HAVE TRIED EVERYTHING ON THE MARKET  HERBAL-NON HERBAL AND YOU CANT KEEP TAKING CORTIZONE CREAM   IT WORKS FOR A COUPLE OF DAYS THEN BACK AGAIN..  I HAVE BEEN TOLD TODAY  THAT ITS EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEFORMALDEHYDE WHAT THE HELL IS THIS??????SO NATURALLY CONCERNED HAD ANOTHER WINE   THEN  THOUGHT OKAY  ITS PAPERBASED   GLOSSY MAGOS AND CHEMICALS IN THINGS THAT I USE...BUT HEY IHAVE USED ALL NON SOAPS AND CHEMICAL FREE AS PER THERE LABEL(YEAH RIGHT  NEED A DEGREE TO NO WHAT IS IN THAT PRODUCT?) TO NO AVAIL SO SOMEONE TOLD ME ABOUT chickweek ointment  AND GUESS WHAT IT HELPS HASNT CURED IT BUT IT STOPPED THE ITCH AND THE CRACK SO WHERE TO NOW,,,,,ANYONE ELSE HAVE SOME GREAT CURES....I AM NOT GOING ON INJECTIONS    NO WAY     THIS MUST BE STOPPED SO COMIN ON SOMEONE GIVE ME SOME ADVICE YEAH   ....LUV YA..DEB

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Ceri, Community Member
2/25/11 4:52pm

I've recently had tests done, and have been told that my allergy is caused by Formaldehyde.  You need to check the ingrediants in everything you wash in, clean with and eat, as some of the chemicals that make up Formaldehyde are used as a preservative. The chemicals that make up formaldehyde are:

 

Imidazolidinyl urea (Germall 115)

Diazolidinyl urea (Germall II)

Quaternium 15 (Dowicil 200)

2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1, 3-diol (Bronopol)

DMDM hydantoin

Hexamethylenetetramine

 

Formaldehyde is also released from certain other chemicals such as Dowicil75, Tris Nitro, Grotan HD2 or BK, Triadine-10, Onyxide 200, Vancide TH, Myacide BT.

 

The 6 items listed above are commonly found in:

fabric furnishings, cosmetics, nail polishes, mouthwashes, deodorants, household cleaners, disinfectants, shampoos, fertilisers, pesticides, medicated creams, glues/varnishes, antifreeze, cutting oils, coolants, air fresheners, fibreboard, plastics, metal cleaners, tyre cleaners, anticorrosion agents, plywood, polishes, finishes, histopathology labs, high-quality paper, photographic chemicals, leather tanning, embalming fluid, rubber preservative, dental preparations, car exhaust, renal dialysis rinse, water soluble paints, dyes and inks, charcoal, wood, coal and cigarette smoke, insulation (urea formaldehyde foam) textile resins (esp urea, phenol and melamine resins)

 

I have managed to find body washes and shampoos, the 'Simple' range, but make sure you read the ingrediants because even this range contain some of the chemiclas, and the cream i use off the doctor is diprobase.

 

I hope this manages to help somone! xx

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JLC, Community Member
3/24/13 3:48pm

FYI ... formaldehyde is in the numbing stuff they use when doing root canals!

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albar, Community Member
3/ 6/09 12:44pm

I use alot of Boots products.  They sell it at target.  You can get makeup and bodywash and nail polish and lotions.  My rash improved alot since I switched.  Still looking for a good shampoo though.  It's a tough allergy especially since they say it's in indoor and outdoor air!!!  My dr gave me a prescripton cream to use.  I find it hard to reading all the labels b/c there are so many different names for it. 

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Marie, Community Member
7/ 8/09 10:01pm

I use Vani-cream products and they seem to do the job for me.

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inga, Community Member
1/20/10 2:00pm

hi there.use free and clear shampoos and conditioners , wwwpsico.com ,korres make up line in sephora cosmetic stores and   lavanila parfum and deodorant is super ,any ouestion inganyc@yahoo,com ,did my research! where can i find shoes allergic to most and do not like to buy them second hand !

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steph, Community Member
4/18/09 11:29am

I saw a specialist and they gave me brands that I can use that do not have formaldehyde.  The brands are Cliniderm(shampoos, conditioners, creams) and nature clean (shampoo, body wash, conditioners, household cleaners like dish soap, laundry detergent etc.)  The chemicals to look for on products are DMDM hydantoin, Quaternium 10 or 15, Methylchloroisothiazolinone abbreviated(MCI/MI). 

Hope this helps

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Tracey, Community Member
7/28/09 2:01am

I've been told by my doctor that it's often not written on the products if they contacin Formaldehyde? Is this true - if so this makes it very hard to know what products to use.

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Theresa B, Community Member
1/20/13 9:41pm

I've been told this as well, by multiple doctors. Companies use language loopholes to avoid letting on that formaldehyde is in their product sometimes - sounds like a conspiracy theory but it's true. Further, anything that lists "perfume" or "fragrance" as an ingredient is always suspect because you don't know what might be in there. After getting a patch test I received a list of safe products and it often comes down to the fragrance - a product with one scent might be ok but even the exact same product simply has a different scent it's a disaster.

 

Like many people here, I've had a hard time with this and suggest finding a dermatologist ASAP who can help you cope on a long-term basis.

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fisherman, Community Member
6/23/09 11:55am

I was recently told that I am sensitive to formaldehyde and formaldehye resins.  My dermatologist said clothing from Eddie Bauer, Banana Republic are mostly okay.  Best to stay with all cotton otherwise.  Your dermatologist can access the Contact Allergen Replacement Database of the Mayo Clinic to get a list of skin care products that are okay.  Pharmaceutical Specialties, Rochester, MN has a line of products (Free & Clear shampoo, Vanicream lotion, etc.) that don't cost an arm and a leg.  I agree with the person who said Prednisone is one bad drug!

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anurse, Community Member
7/20/09 2:01am

I found out I had a formaldehyde allergy half-way through nursing school. Talk about hurt hands! I wash my hands constantly at work and have permission to bring my own soap, but have had a hard time finding a safe liquid soap. Thanks for all the product tips!

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Sheryl, Community Member
9/ 6/10 12:21am

My dermatologist told me to use only CeraVe hydrating cleanser (a liquid hand soap) and Cerave Cream and lotion (for moisturising). They both work very well and don't cause any irritation or rash.

 

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Doobie's Mom, Community Member
1/19/13 6:27pm

Dr. Brommers Magic Soaps 100% castille. I use it for face, body, hair, and dishes.  I get the unscented baby mild.  bar or liquid.  they sell it at Krogers and Whole Foods and Vitmin Shoppe.

 

Walgreens has introduced a line of cleaning products and paper products called OLOGY that don't contain any of the top 10 chemical irritants.  I have had good luck with spray cleaner, window cleaner, their laundry soap (great lavendar vanilla scent) and facial tissue.

 

Hope this helps.

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Dr. Fulk, Community Member
9/26/09 3:47pm

Don, mo-zyme is a vitamin made here in the US that will clear the aldehydes out of your system.

Dr. Fulk

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Kris, Community Member
4/27/10 1:12pm

can a child of 6 yrs take mozyme for environmental allergies like oak tre pollens? hate singulair!

kristin

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maree@queensland, Community Member
5/14/12 7:01am

Ive been having many lupus like symptoms especially in my eyes there always sore,tired and very dry. now drs think i have a auto immune condition but i have been doing my own research & have discovered i have fomaldehyde posioning due to using aspartamane fot the last 20 yrs.i am desperate to find a cure & find something that will make my eyes go back to normal. i have seen eye specialist he wants me to see another one but  iknow what it is but no one can help me.

                                                  maree

                                                   queensland australia

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Stuart, Community Member
10/21/12 12:23am

Hi Maree;

 

I was diagnosed with formaldehyde sensitivity over 14 years ago. The first thing I would recommend is that you find a good dermatologist and have them conduct a 'patch' test which will confirm what you are and are not sensitive to.

 

If this confirms what you think is the cause the main response is to reduce and/or eliminate the source of formaldehyde exposure in your daily life. The best way to do this is to conduct an audit of the products you use to identify those which contain formaldehyde and just as importantly formaldehyde releasing agents (these are agents which as they break down over time release formaldehyde).

 

As other replies on this site correctly identify formaldehyde is rarely if ever listed as one of the ingredients in a product, it is most often listed as one of its 'preservative' names which can include:

 

Formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers and common preservative names for formaldehyde:

 

Formaldehyde:

Also known as:

Formalin

Methylene Glycol

 

 

Formaldehyde releasers:

 

Diazolidinyl urea:

Diazolidinyl urea is an antimicrobial preservative used in cosmetics. It is chemically related to imidazolidinyl urea which is used in the same way. Diazolidinyl urea acts as a formaldehyde releaser.

It is used in many cosmetics, skin care products, shampoos and conditioners, as well as a wide range of products including bubble baths, baby wipes and household detergents. Diazolidinyl urea is found in the commercially available preservative Germaben.

Commercial diazolidinyl urea is a mixture of different formaldehyde addition products including polymers.[2]

Synthesis:

Diazolidinyl urea is produced by the chemical reaction of allantoin and formaldehyde in the presence of sodium hydroxide solution and heat. The reaction mixture is then neutralized with hydrochloric acid and evaporated.

 

Imidazolidinyl urea:

Most commonly used preservative in cosmetics after parabens.

 

Quaternium-15:

Widely used as preservative in the following products:

Shampoos and conditioners

Eye makeup

Foundation and makeup

Lotions and creams

Shaving products

Bath gels

Liquid soaps

 

Dusting powders

 

DMDM hydantoin:

Colourless liquid

Marketed under the name Glydant

Contains 0.5% - 2% free formaldehyde and over 17% combined formaldehyde

 

Bronopol:

Most commonly used in cosmetic product formulations.

 

Tetrasodium EDTA:

Prepared from ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and sodium cyanide in basic solution, or from ethylenediamine and sodium chloroacetate, EDTA is a strong complexing and chelating agent. It reacts with many metallic ions to form soluble chelates.

Also called versene, sequestrol, and sequestrene

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/edta#ixzz1gm9ddstz

 

 

 

A formaldehyde releaser is a chemical compound that slowly releases formaldehyde.

Contents:

1. Antimicrobials

2. Resins and plastics

3. Others

4. See also

 

Antimicrobials:

Formaldehyde releasers are often used as an antimicrobial preservative in cosmetics. Examples include:

Quaternium-15

Imidazolidinyl urea (Germall 115)

Diazolidinyl urea (Germall II)

DMDM hydantoin (Glydant)

2-Bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol (Bronopol) (formaldehyde release is not related to mechanism of action)

Tris(hydroxymethyl) nitromethane (Tris Nitro)

Hydroxymethylglycinate (Suttocide A)

 

Resins and plastics:

Polyoxymethylene plastic (Delrin)

Phenol formaldehyde resin

Urea formaldehyde resin

Melamine resin

 

Others:

 

Paraformaldehyde.

 

 

I find it best to call product help lines and ask direct questions of them re the ingredients. You will often find they have to speak to their manufacturing teams but it will give you an accurate answer.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Stuart (Perth, W.A.)

 

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michellew6k, Community Member
9/ 4/14 1:16pm

Great post Stuart!  I did have a patch test about 18 years ago and all the things in his post I also am allergic to, plus the following. I would like to add methylisothiazolinone and methylchloroisothiazolinone to Stuart's list.  Both are preservatives added to maintain product freshness and to prevent bacteria growth in everything from dishwashing liquids to lotions and cosmetics.  I was also diagnosed about 15 years ago.  There are whole cosmetic brands that I avoid like the plague, and several clothing detergents that I cannot use, among SO many other things!  One post here said Mary Kay is good. I think a few lipsticks and other color cosmetics may be OK.  However, I mistakenly ordered a skin care line after a consultant said they were all natural and had a reaction after just a few days.  After carefully reading the labels, I was indeed allergic!  Always read labels!  Don't buy something if they don't list the active ingredient as well as the inactive ingredients.  So, for the solution: read labels like crazy to avoid problems.  But if you can't, or miss something, my Dr. prescribed betamethasone cream, .05%.  It also comes in an ointment.  This stuff is a steroid, so I use very little and only when I have a flair up caused by using something I should not have used on my skin.  A tube lasts me 2-3 years. 


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adrimare, Community Member
12/ 2/09 7:39pm

Look at this web site it has all the information you need. Also note that real organic textiles have no formaldehyde. But they can be contaminated with other textiles that are. So wash 2 times before useing.

http://adrimare.web.officelive.com/default.aspx

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adrimare, Community Member
4/29/12 9:11pm

The new website is http://contactdermatitis.sharepoint.com/Pages/default.aspx

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adrimare, Community Member
4/29/12 9:14pm
GMT, Community Member
12/ 3/09 4:10pm

I tested allergic to formaldehyde.  How can I tell if a product contains it?

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adrimare, Community Member
1/29/10 10:06am

many products also contain chemicals that release formaldehyde see http://adrimare.web.officelive.com/default.aspx for more deails.

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adrimare, Community Member
4/29/12 9:09pm

The new website is http://contactdermatitis.sharepoint.com/Pages/default.aspx

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adrimare, Community Member
4/29/12 9:13pm
Mrs Smith, Community Member
11/10/11 4:56am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formaldehyde

 

Read this article in Wikipedia, it seems fairly up to date.  And also on Dermnet NZ

 

http://dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/formaldehyde-allergy.html

 

 

I only have to be in the briefest contact with formaldehyde to be itching for 3 months after the withdrawal of the formaldehyde.  I have noticed that heating the source of the formaldehyde seems to activate it, or make it worse.

 

Formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers are anti fungals, preservatives and can be found in everything.

 

Proctor and Gamble have a very useful site in Europe, with lists of ingredients.

 

http://www.scienceinthebox.com/info-pg/index.html

 

You need an emollient which doesn't have anything in it that you are allergic to.  In the UK,  I use Nivea, this one suits me.

 

http://www.nivea.co.uk/products/NIVEA-Soft

 

 

The Drermnet NZ site is a mine of information, have a look!

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Chrisy, Community Member
10/15/10 3:42pm

Sorry, Don formaldehydes has been a problem for a long time you need to do a lot of reading and research to see what works for you in your situation. Read up on internet there has been a lot of research done over the lst few years and it is becoming more of a problem. I first was diagnosed with it in 1988 when I was told I was having aproblem with 11 different varietys of the stuff. I was a prefessional car valet at the time and got so bad that when I had to give up because of health for ever getting pneumonia having to visit a respiratory specalist who told me I had lost 80% and 90% of lung use. Hands would never stop blistering and cracked itchy, I had 2 toddlers plus trying to run a business. But there is a way but I tell you it does take a long time and a very different way you have to start living you life. In 1988 not much was known Wellington was my first port of call lots of reading Specalist was fantastic she gave me lots of info.

I still have to been very careful even though I have been clean and green since 1999 (I was not wanting to give up my business so carried on but was not a good idea) nearly 12 years staying away from it but I tell you you are never safe.

Just the other month my daughter and husband moved into their new home, we  my husband and I helped, I packed the plates etc. in newspaper and unpacked at the other end. I have since 24 July 2010 been in a mess again having to have 6 weeks predinose have put on 18kilos hands are still cracked, blistered, itchy, and because it has gone through the system have breathing problems and feet also blistering and cracked.

Be very interested to know what job you do, but it is possible to work through it but there is a lot of reading to do, everyone is slightly different. good luck

\

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Mrs Smith, Community Member
2/10/11 3:06pm

I too am allergic to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers.  Have a look at the following website.  It is a mine of information.  http://www.dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/formaldehyde-allergy.html  

 

Plants are also useful for removing fomraldehyde from the atmosphere, for example Spider plants.  http://www.suite101.com/content/indoor-plants-create-fresh-air-a121481 

 

It takes a lot of research to find all the sources of formaldehyde.  I have just had another flare up by picking up a pack of coffee beans.  It is in ink, paper, glossy paper apart from things like clothes etc. that you have all mentioned. 

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Kay, Community Member
9/10/11 4:41pm

I have suffered from a formidable formaldehyde allergy for 12 years.  It took me 6 years of suffering (and seeing 5 different doctors) before a specialist at UC Medical Center in San Francisco finally gave me the diagnosis. The answers above are all pieces to the puzzle.  Let me add: take your own soaps, shampoos, toilet paper, sheets and towels when going to a hotel.  Some toilet paper contains formaldehyde according to my dermatologist....best to use natural toilet paper.  I was allergic to our mattress and had to replace it. Essie and Revlon nail polishes do not contain formaldehyde.  Personally, I have no problems with Clinique and Bare Minerals makeup. Nor do I have problems with Matrix Biolage shampoo. I carry a list in my wallet of the various names for formaldehyde and check labels before purchasing.  Hope this info helps my fellow formaldehyde allergic sufferers!

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EMS, Community Member
9/26/11 6:04pm

Can you, or anyone else tell me how you found out that your mattress was the problem?  What type of mattress did you find that reduced the symptoms?

 

I was diagnosed today after "greening" most  everything in an attempt to deal with the ongoing rashes etc.  But never thought of the mattress.

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Mrs Smith, Community Member
10/20/11 4:47am

Write to all the manufacturers of products you own and/or suspect.  Decent companies are keen to help.  It is in their interest to help you.

Don't forget prescription medicines too, they have all sorts in them.

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ItchynScratchy, Community Member
11/ 9/11 6:38pm
Hi I had exactly the same problems, all over my upper body constant eye infections big cracks down my back, itching like I have never had before all day and all night along with large blisters. It looked alot more like a chemical burn than a reaction to something. It affected me for around 11 months and we could not work out for the life of us what was causing it. People thought I was nuts and just whining when I explained it to people, my mental health was beginning to suffer I was just so sick of being itchy and weepy, not being able to sleep or ever get comfortable I'm sure it would be a really effective torture lol. I was prescribed every strength/type of cream imaginable none worked, I was taking antihistamine tablets every day the only tablet that gave me relief was Prednisolone 25mg tablets (traded in Australia as Sone 25mg) but it can only be used for 6 days at a time with a weeks break in between. It's a powerful drug with some pretty bad side affects including more rashes Lol but it was the only thing that gave me sweet relief. The thing is I got the reaction from wearing high visibility cotton work shirts, while working in the north west of western australia in temperatures around 45-50 degrees Celsius (113-122 F) which just made it so much worse. After looking for information on the web of which there is not much useful information at all. Telling people to avoid the source really doesn't help seeing as usually it can't be avoided and formaldehyde is in so many day to day products in my case it's safety clothing that I have to wear for work. I have found this website: http://www.thecanaryreport.org/category/toxics/ it has instructions on how to remove it from your clothes, I am currently trying it out now, it's fairly time consuming but if you've had the rash you won't care. Are there any treatments to desensitize the body to formaldehyde? Reply
Mrs Smith, Community Member
11/10/11 4:44am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formaldehyde

 

Read this article in Wikipedia, it seems fairly up to date.  And also on Dermnet NZ

 

http://dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/formaldehyde-allergy.html

 

I am sorry you are suffering and you have my sympathy.  I don't think they desensitise because it might kill you!  Or, it causes more problems than it solves.

 

I only have to be in the briefest contact with formaldehyde to be itching for 3 months after the withdrawal of the formaldehyde.  I have noticed that heating the source of the formaldehyde seems to activate it.

 

In the UK, the company would have to provide you with clothing that you are not allergic to.   Can you not find similar formaldehyde free clothing, that you could buy yourself?

 

Another point, are you certain you aren't allergic to something in the washing powder [or whatever you use?]  Formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers are anti fungals, preservatives and are in everything.

 

Proctor and Gamble have a very useful site in Europe, with lists of ingredients.

 

http://www.scienceinthebox.com/info-pg/index.html

 

 

Do you know exactly what you are allergic to?  Have you been patch tested?

 

The next thing you need, is an emollient, which doesn't have anything in it that you are allergic to.  In the UK,  I use Nivea, this one suits me.

 

http://www.nivea.co.uk/products/NIVEA-Soft

 

 

Good Luck.  I hope things improve for you and if you haven't been patch tested, have that done, then it is a lot of reading and also trial and error.  The Drermnet NZ site is a mine of information, have a look!

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Bob, Community Member
2/25/12 3:47pm

I have a strong sensitivity to formaldehyde which began in the 80"s And has not gotten worse, but has stayed constant. I am mostly bothered by being in homes built since the 60's which all contain plywood and particle board which are glued together with formaldehyde glue. The formaldehyde leatches out into the home virtually forever. Most people are able to filter the toxins through their livers and don't feel syopmtoms at the levels present in homes. In those who are sensitive, their are a few very troubling symptoms: strong fatigue; disorientation; sore throat and eyes. If I were to spend a night in a home built since the early 60's I would awaken feeling "drugged" and foggy, as formaldehyde acts a a depressant in people with sensitivity to it. I was tested at the Clevland Clinic and found to be clinically sensitive to it. My docor and most doctors recognize the existence of sensitivity but the Clinic's official statement is that it doesn't really exist. I am guessing that they are trying to avoid a legal "can of worms" because their buildings contain A Lot od formaldehyde in carpeting, tons of particle board furniture, stain guarded fabrics, etc.
I live in a home that was built in 1938, pre-plywood and particle board and have no carpeting except for some area rugs which are pure wool hand knotted with no backing material. I must drive Volvos because they have the absloute least toxic interiors of any manufacturers. That info can be googled.

Formaldehyde is present in so many products under several chemical names that it is impossible to completely avoid. It is in cosmetics, make-up, shampoo, carpeting, as a dressing on all new clothing, wrinkle-free treatment on clothes, fertilizer and many, many more products. It is here to stay because of it's huge economic power....IT IS !.4% of the gross nAtional product!!!!!!!!!!! There have been bills in the U.S. to pull it from residential building products, cArpeting and cosmetics but the lobbying force behind it has killed every bill proposed and now no one even tries. It is scarry to think that a known carcinogen is so widely present in our lives and what it is doing to public health, whether or not we all feel symptoms. Those that do feel symptoms are like canaries in the mine. What about all of the miners????? 

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Bob, Community Member
2/25/12 3:48pm

I have a strong sensitivity to formaldehyde which began in the 80"s And has not gotten worse, but has stayed constant. I am mostly bothered by being in homes built since the 60's which all contain plywood and particle board which are glued together with formaldehyde glue. The formaldehyde leatches out into the home virtually forever. Most people are able to filter the toxins through their livers and don't feel syopmtoms at the levels present in homes. In those who are sensitive, their are a few very troubling symptoms: strong fatigue; disorientation; sore throat and eyes. If I were to spend a night in a home built since the early 60's I would awaken feeling "drugged" and foggy, as formaldehyde acts a a depressant in people with sensitivity to it. I was tested at the Clevland Clinic and found to be clinically sensitive to it. My docor and most doctors recognize the existence of sensitivity but the Clinic's official statement is that it doesn't really exist. I am guessing that they are trying to avoid a legal "can of worms" because their buildings contain A Lot od formaldehyde in carpeting, tons of particle board furniture, stain guarded fabrics, etc.
I live in a home that was built in 1938, pre-plywood and particle board and have no carpeting except for some area rugs which are pure wool hand knotted with no backing material. I must drive Volvos because they have the absloute least toxic interiors of any manufacturers. That info can be googled.

Formaldehyde is present in so many products under several chemical names that it is impossible to completely avoid. It is in cosmetics, make-up, shampoo, carpeting, as a dressing on all new clothing, wrinkle-free treatment on clothes, fertilizer and many, many more products. It is here to stay because of it's huge economic power....IT IS !.4% of the gross nAtional product!!!!!!!!!!! There have been bills in the U.S. to pull it from residential building products, cArpeting and cosmetics but the lobbying force behind it has killed every bill proposed and now no one even tries. It is scarry to think that a known carcinogen is so widely present in our lives and what it is doing to public health, whether or not we all feel symptoms. Those that do feel symptoms are like canaries in the mine. What about all of the miners????? 

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mr.boss, Community Member
1/ 5/13 3:26am

I feel like i am suffocating while reading this, i'm sat  at a desk made of plywood, next to my plywood drawers, bad frame, a large chipboard manufacturer maybe 30miles away but grew up living only 2-3miles away till i was 18yrs old, now 35 and suffering with something bad! i am sure it's an allergy but to what i don't know but i beleive it's formaldehyde, i have tried all other things and done the dust mites, cottons, air cleaners, anti-histamines, something in this room makes me sick!! 

It's my bedroom the only room in the house where i'm supposed to feel safe and comfortable yet i wake up feeling really foggy, like i've been hit my a bus(thats what i often say), this is how it feels, puffy face and it builds up uover weeks and i suffer with bad migraines too+allergic rhinitus which i am sure is all down to the allergy...

Like the other guy on this forum posted about his doctors trying to say he had psychosomatic symtoms etc. i get the same kinda thing from my doctor/s, the most i can get is an allergy skin test where they prink your skin with a needly with a test sample usng a neutral tester which should remain no change to skin then they test with tree, grass, gog, cat, pollen etc etc... i flared up to 90% of what they tested me for but i am desperate to get a firmer diagnosis and identify whats making me sick. All the tests i had so far i had to really push for and research... i'm tired of it now...just living with this allergy/illness which controls my life.

It is scary and sad how greedy fat cat bosses are prepared to sacrifice peoples health over their big bonuses, what on earth is this stuff still doing in products today? makes me wonder how it even got there in the first place when i look at what it's made up of and how closely some of those chems are linked to other mind altering substances and poisons, is formaldehyde a money making scheme? make people sick for a reason? or surpress/control them? i'm probabbly paranoid but makes me wonder....  i'd love to know more on how it ended up in glue and other products and if if was a neccesary product to use? or a specifically chosen one?

Nice to find some info on Formaldehyde on here anyway it has given me a new avenue to explore, will now try to get tested and aim to remove as much as i can from my home and life...

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Charlie girl, Community Member
4/10/12 2:15am

Oxynators neutralize Formaldehye gases as well as other chemicals, bacteria in the air.  There are ones for use at home, in your car, or wearable/portable ones that will help you where ever you go.  Do a bit of research on the internet on them.

 

DMSO works great for detoxing, as well as many of the other allergic syptoms. You need to be responsible with it, and do you own research before you start using it.  I no longer tell people what and how to do it, those that really need the help, do their own research will know how to do so safely.

 

Making homemade cleaners, personal products, etc from regular kitchen items like vingegar, baking soda, etc can cheaply and easily be done.  Do a few google searches with homemade ------ and list the item you want to find.  I just went shopping for everything to replace all my commerical products for cleaners, shampoo, conditioner, toothpaste, mouthwash, laundry detergent, hand pump soap, fabric softerner and others.

 

Hope these tips help you find what you need....just a few clicks awy on google searches.

 

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We hope you find this general health information helpful. Please note however, that this Q&A is meant to support not replace the professional medical advice you receive from your doctor. No information in the Answers above is intended to diagnose or treat any condition. The views expressed in the Answers above belong to the individuals who posted them and do not necessarily reflect the views of Remedy Health Media. Remedy Health Media does not review or edit content posted by our community members, but reserves the right to remove any material it deems inappropriate.

By Don, Community Member— Last Modified: 09/04/14, First Published: 07/25/08