FROM OUR EXPERTS

  • Vicki M
    Health Guide
    April 20, 2008
    Vicki M
    Health Guide
    April 20, 2008

    Hi Jamie,

     

    As far as cedar pollens and trees, Joy Buchanan has given you a good resource to look at. While it is best to consult your doctor, using the information provided online can help you ask all the right questions.

     

    One link I found but can not substantiate (so take it with a grain of salt) was at a site called Allergynursing.com. The complete link is here, but here is an excerpt.

     

    "Exposure to cedar wood is documented as an occupational hazard among timber workers. The culprit is plicatic acid which can cause asthma and other respiratory complications. None of my resources have indicated any correlation between the rhinitis (runny nose) symptoms of cedar pollen allergy with the asthma induced by cedar shavings and dust. However a correlation has not been ruled out either.

     

    Cedar smells wonderful and it's moth killing properties are great for lining closets and chests. But some have suggested that the fact that it KILLS moths indicates it is probably not so good for you and me either. Ask your physician for his or her recommendations. Until more research is available in this area, allergy and asthma sufferers may want to breathe easier by avoiding cedar wood."

     

    I love the smell of new cedar furniture, but then I don't have a cedar allergy. Please do stay in touch and let us know what happens when you see your doctor. It would be interesting to know what your doctor has to say.

     

     

    Stay in touch!

    Vicki M

     

     

  • JB
    JB
    Editor
    April 17, 2008
    JB
    JB
    Editor
    April 17, 2008

    The best information I've found for this was from the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology. According to AAAAI, people with tree allergies shouldn't have a problem with wood used to build homes because that wood is cured for use in construction.
    People allergic to cedar, though, should not be near buring cedar. There are chemicals in the wood that are released into the air when the wood is burned or shaved.

    So, a cedar closet, for example, might not be a problem, but you should take special note of your symptoms, if any, after contact with the wood or any other part of the trees you are allergic too.

    Most important, be sure to ask your doctor about this and get specific recommendations for your allergies.


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