What is Alzheimer's Disease?

The Difference Between Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

David Roeltgen, MD Health Guide April 16, 2007
  • One question I am frequently asked is "What is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's disease?" On one level, the answer to this question is relatively easy and straightforward. Compare the definitions of dementia and Alzheimer's.   Dementia:   Dementia is an impairment of thin...

50 Comments
  • Anonymous
    FalseMedicalRep...
    Sep. 10, 2012

    Guardianship and conservatorship of the vulnerable elderly has become BIG BUSINESS for lawyers and other fiduciaries ("persons of trust").  They are able to suck a victim into their "protection" web by working with unethical doctors who submit false medical reports as to mental capacity, permitting  a corrupt jduge to rule that the victim is incompetent....

    RHMLucky777

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    Guardianship and conservatorship of the vulnerable elderly has become BIG BUSINESS for lawyers and other fiduciaries ("persons of trust").  They are able to suck a victim into their "protection" web by working with unethical doctors who submit false medical reports as to mental capacity, permitting  a corrupt jduge to rule that the victim is incompetent.  
    For the rest of the story, see StopGuardianAbuse.org.

  • Anonymous
    Ladywriter
    Jul. 10, 2011

    This is my explanation only from my own personal experience what the difference is. I am not medically trained but just speak from my own observations of family members with both. Whether I am correct or not remains to be seen. But I think this is the easier way of explaining between the two.

     

    Dementia. My Mother In Law has this. She can still function...

    RHMLucky777

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    This is my explanation only from my own personal experience what the difference is. I am not medically trained but just speak from my own observations of family members with both. Whether I am correct or not remains to be seen. But I think this is the easier way of explaining between the two.

     

    Dementia. My Mother In Law has this. She can still function properly in her own home and even do stuff like washing and sorting out clothing and chatting normally. She can watch TV and turn it on and off etc. Manage alone when her son is at work. Wash and dresses herself. She still hangs out the washing on the line in the garden. Walk about fine with no aids or help. Even cooking she can still do. She is 86 years old to. But she cant, arrange things now for herself, like making a doctors appointment and remembering to write it down on the calender. She repeats same question over and over forgetting she asked it. So like short term memory, and not safe for her to go out alone as she falls a lot now, but she has not gotten any worse and has remained at the same level now for a few years. but she has had crying fits and gets upset very easily if stressed. And has sometimes wanted lots of attention as well. 

     

    Alzheimers. My Father has this. He is 81 years old. Now in a care home, He can not do nothing of what Mother In Law can do. He has to be washed and dressed and cant function properly without 24/7 help now. He has lost lots of weight and has to be monitored when eating and drinking now otherwise he just stares at it. His conversation is very limited and when he speaks hes very quiet now. He gets depressed a lot and just stares into space as if he is not even here at all. He cant walk anymore and keeps falling. He has to have help with everything now, washing, and dressing and now has a catheter as well. He does not know what year it is, where he used to live or even what day it is. Most of his past memory has gone and present. He cant remember his old address and is gradually forgetting peoples names now. He keeps getting infections as well. 

     

    So I guess the difference is.

    Dementia, just the memory goes and repeats oneself or ask same questions, but still able to do stuff around the house and know who is who. Its just they forgot they already asked you, if you wanted the tea or not. 

     

    Alzheimerss much worse, the person in the end cant function at all and ends up getting infections. They have to be washed and dressed and cant remember 10minutes ago. Some become child like state again. 

  • pkrueger55
    Sep. 26, 2010

    I would like to know if one is diagnosed with dementia (elderly).  How do you help them when they are in a panic about not being able to find their husband who has passed away years ago?  I am an LPN and don't believe it is right to tell them they have passed away.  I believe one has to tell them that you will let them know where she is at when...

    RHMLucky777

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    I would like to know if one is diagnosed with dementia (elderly).  How do you help them when they are in a panic about not being able to find their husband who has passed away years ago?  I am an LPN and don't believe it is right to tell them they have passed away.  I believe one has to tell them that you will let them know where she is at when you see them..  Is this the right thing to do.  I believe if you tell them that their spouse has passed away, that you are going to make them more depressed than they already are.  Is there someone out there who knows the correct thing to do? 

    • Carol Bradley Bursack
      Health Guide
      Sep. 27, 2010

      I believe you are right. You may want to read this about "Getting into their heads"  - it's about not arguing. We want them as content as possible. You have very good instincts. This approach is now called the validation theory.

       

      Blessings,

      Carol

    • NC
      NC
      Sep. 27, 2010

      In a way, validation theory is good for late stage of Alzheimer's elders. But when the truth is obvious, one just has to gently tell the elder the somewhat truth, not the whole truth. e.g., tell him the wife is not here and is in heaven, but don't elaborate on how she died or where she is buried and etc. It does not work if you tell a white lie when the elder...

      RHMLucky777

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      In a way, validation theory is good for late stage of Alzheimer's elders. But when the truth is obvious, one just has to gently tell the elder the somewhat truth, not the whole truth. e.g., tell him the wife is not here and is in heaven, but don't elaborate on how she died or where she is buried and etc. It does not work if you tell a white lie when the elder is still alert. He will look for her forever and goes nowhere. However, when the elder is sicker or even is in the nursing home, then we can use validation theory and just say she is not here yet and distract or redirect the elder. This is what happened to my father-in-law. In a way he has known the truth and he is ok with it. In fact, he only asked about it when he got quite upset for a few times in 6 years (she left in 2004.) Most of the time he is OK and he just wants to hit on some other ladies hoping he will get another wife. Not that he does not miss her but he is realistic at times.

       

      It depends on the person. But if you have to come to the point to totally pretend the person is alive and play the game, I think it is going too far. Some people like to do this, but I think the elder deserves the half-truth, not a total lie.

       

      Regards,
      Nina

    • Anonymous
      Anne
      Apr. 07, 2011

      Tell them whatever will make them happiest.  I tried to correct my mother when she asked me how my mother was.  Yes, I know it sounds crazy, but there I was in a conversation with my mother and she was asking me about my mother not realizing that SHE was my mother.  When I tried to tell her that she was my mother, she became extremely agitated,...

      RHMLucky777

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      Tell them whatever will make them happiest.  I tried to correct my mother when she asked me how my mother was.  Yes, I know it sounds crazy, but there I was in a conversation with my mother and she was asking me about my mother not realizing that SHE was my mother.  When I tried to tell her that she was my mother, she became extremely agitated, began to cry and acted like I was trying to confuse her.  I dropped it and let her believe that her cousin Lula was really my mother.  Several hours later, she remembered that I was her daughter.  We've also had several incidences where she thinks my father is really her father or she asks for her parents who have been dead for decades.  We used to correct her, but have realized that only upsets her.  When we go along with whatever she says, she remains calm and will remember the truth later without remembering that we didn't correct her earlier misconceptions.  The way we handle it is to say that whomever she is looking for is not here right now, but we will let her know when they get here. 

  • NC
    NC
    Sep. 14, 2010

    Some people didn't get the dementia diagnosed properly until the last stage because it was obvious in the last stage.

    However, this does not mean that diagnosing is not important. It is still important to know if it is vascular dementia so one can get the right prescription to control it, or if it is Alzheimer's and then one can take the right dementia drugs...

    RHMLucky777

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    Some people didn't get the dementia diagnosed properly until the last stage because it was obvious in the last stage.

    However, this does not mean that diagnosing is not important. It is still important to know if it is vascular dementia so one can get the right prescription to control it, or if it is Alzheimer's and then one can take the right dementia drugs for quality of life.

    It is extremely important to get properly diagnosed. Although most people in the past are not used to be diagnosed or lack the knowledge to be diagnosed including some family doctors. Specialist such as psychiatrist or neurologist is able to make the proper diagnosis. Family doctors often don't have the tool or knowledge to judge the diagnosis.

     

    In my personal experience, it helps to diagnose earlier so we know what is wrong with my father-in-law who has late stage of Alzheimer's.

     

    Dementia is not about the mind only - it is a brain disease. Once the brain goes downhill, the whole body is gone too.

     

    Nina

  • Anonymous
    Sherlin Dukes
    Sep. 14, 2010

    Great article, I work in an alzheimers /dementia clinic, it is wonderfull but frustrating work and many patients are diagnosed without any form of brain scan, MRI ,CT and never or rarely, rarely a PET , so this is a great article to inform people and help esp. with diagnosis. symptoms of dementia

  • Lora Serra
    Jul. 30, 2010

    I usually explain it this way: It's like hair. There are many different types of hair: straight hair, curly hair, thick hair, fly away hair, coarse hair. Each type of hair behaves/responds differently, as we can quickly see walking down the hair product aisle of the drug store. So if you liken Dementia to hair, Alzheimer's...

    RHMLucky777

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    I usually explain it this way: It's like hair. There are many different types of hair: straight hair, curly hair, thick hair, fly away hair, coarse hair. Each type of hair behaves/responds differently, as we can quickly see walking down the hair product aisle of the drug store. So if you liken Dementia to hair, Alzheimer's disease can be likened to a type of hair, that behaves/progresses differently than other types of dementia.

  • Bob DeMarco
    Jul. 23, 2010

    What’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?

     

    http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2010/06/whats-difference-between-alzheimers-and.html

     

     

     

  • grandma
    Jul. 14, 2010

    can some one please help me to understand i have read all this and still at a lose. are dementia and alzemers the same. if he has been diganosed with early dementia will he get full alzemers. over the past two years i have seen more and more memory lose is that all or will he steadily get worse.  any help would be appreciated  ty

    • Christine Kennard
      Health Pro
      Jul. 15, 2010

      Here are links to two shareposts that I think you will find helpful. The first is about the stages of Alzheimer's that you can expect when someone has the disease. It gives you general information. Several models have been developed that describe the progressive worsening of symptoms and the loss of function of Alzheimer's disease.

      7 Stages of Alzheimer's Disease...

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      Here are links to two shareposts that I think you will find helpful. The first is about the stages of Alzheimer's that you can expect when someone has the disease. It gives you general information. Several models have been developed that describe the progressive worsening of symptoms and the loss of function of Alzheimer's disease.

      7 Stages of Alzheimer's Disease

       

      How Does Alzheimer's Differ from Other Types of Dementia?

       

      Hope these help

       

      Christine

    • Carol Bradley Bursack
      Health Guide
      Jul. 15, 2010

      Christine's articles are excellent and should help clarify the differences.

      However, the bare-bones explanation is Alzheimer's is one type of dementia. There are many dementias. Alzheimer's is the most common. Vascular is close on its heels.

       

      Carol

    • NC
      NC
      Jul. 15, 2010

      Hi,

       

      I think the term early dementia is the problem that you have. early dementia is not a specific disease itself. First of all, the dementia has not been specific. I suspect the diagnosis is not complete. The patient needs to be diagnosed with specific type of dementia like Alzheimer's or Vascular dementia and so on.

      If the doctor (family doctor I believe)...

      RHMLucky777

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      Hi,

       

      I think the term early dementia is the problem that you have. early dementia is not a specific disease itself. First of all, the dementia has not been specific. I suspect the diagnosis is not complete. The patient needs to be diagnosed with specific type of dementia like Alzheimer's or Vascular dementia and so on.

      If the doctor (family doctor I believe) says it is early dementia, it may mean that it is early stage of any type of dementia. This means you need to further get this diagnosed so that you can tell if it is Alzheimer's or others. There are at least 7 types. The problem is some people prefer not to be diagnosed further thinking it is no use. But the medicine is so advanced that the specialist like neurologists can detec the specific type of dementia.

      To say early dementia is like saying it is early cancer but what cancer in early stage?

       

      Hope this helps,
      Nina

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Jan. 28, 2010

    My husband was 52 when he was rear ended by another car going 50 miles per hour while looking for his damn cell phone on the floor of the car and did not see my husband car stopped at an intersection. He never hit the brakes. I can not believe that there were any signs of early onset Alzheimer's as he was home every day and owned his own business, He is one...

    RHMLucky777

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    My husband was 52 when he was rear ended by another car going 50 miles per hour while looking for his damn cell phone on the floor of the car and did not see my husband car stopped at an intersection. He never hit the brakes. I can not believe that there were any signs of early onset Alzheimer's as he was home every day and owned his own business, He is one of 7 children and there is no family history. He has had grand mall seizures, usually controlled by numerous drugs but lately has been having what the nurses are calling silent seizures. He just kind of stares and has a glazed looked on his face, his face will twitch as well as his arms. He does get Ativan for this. Lately a few medications have been removed at my request in order to allow the doctor to increase another one he is on. I did not want the stronger medicine increased without this change as all he does is sleep when on too high of a dose. Although they tell me Alzheimer's and dementia are the same and the end result is the same, I can not let myself believe that this is not solely the cause of the head trauma. Other doctors agree that the accident is the sole cause. but this facility now says that they can not treat him properly where he is which is a brain center. He can not feed himself, dress himself and has forgotten some of our children, always remembers one and always knows me, kisses me hugs me, just doesn't remember us as a couple. This is simply to hard to bear. I can't believe that a nursing home is a more suitable place for him.He will just be medicated more and be around 80 -90 year olds sitting around a tv in a circle sleeping or just plain sedated. I have visited numerous nursing homes and there is no one there in their 50's.If anyone has had a similiar tradgedy and any infomation, I am desperate. I make so called " brain foods " and bring them to him, although I have been told by a dr. I truly believe, that this will do nothing for him. I feel I need to do something. What if I find out too late, something could have/should have been done?What if I haven't searched the web for enough information? I know there are tests that show brain activity or lack of, but I get no where asking for them.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Dec. 28, 2009

    I found the following page somewhat more helpful. http://ezinearticles.com/?Whats-The-Difference-Between-Alzheimers-and-Dementia?&id=164803

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Aug. 02, 2009

    What a merry-go-round!  This article is a sham.  Dr., you write as if you know nothing about Alzheimer's much less comparing / contrasting it to something else.  Yes, the internet has parrots and ones that are truly intelligent.  We have to distinguish between the two.

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Sep. 06, 2009

      I am very unhappy with this article and it does run  races around itself.  I wanted to know actual symtoms of dementia verses alzheimers and the different types of alzheimers.  My father is being tested and the first test he failed miserable.  He is 82 and so very forgetful, he hides things now, he's all too confused, he's at the point that...

      RHMLucky777

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      I am very unhappy with this article and it does run  races around itself.  I wanted to know actual symtoms of dementia verses alzheimers and the different types of alzheimers.  My father is being tested and the first test he failed miserable.  He is 82 and so very forgetful, he hides things now, he's all too confused, he's at the point that he can't remember my daughters names but the lives with me now.  The first night he stayed with me he was so confused he urined about 3 times on the floor right next to the bathroom. 

       

      However, I must admit I got that after a ct scan or mri scan I will find all this out.  I just wanted more info until I get him in to be scanned.

  • Anonymous
    Ellen Besso
    Apr. 13, 2009

    I found your article very informative. As a midlife caregiver to my mother who has had Alzheimer's Disease for over 10 years, I've found out that every person is affected differently even though their diagnosis is the same. My mother cannot speak coherent sentences anymore, but is very engaged with life still, enjoying the communal atmosphere at her care home,...

    RHMLucky777

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    I found your article very informative. As a midlife caregiver to my mother who has had Alzheimer's Disease for over 10 years, I've found out that every person is affected differently even though their diagnosis is the same. My mother cannot speak coherent sentences anymore, but is very engaged with life still, enjoying the communal atmosphere at her care home, & our visits of course, & communicating with her facial expressions & her eyes. The gift of her dementia has been the loss of much of her anxiety, and she resides in a place of peace & contentment much of the time.

     

    I write about my personal journey & provide information to help other midlife caregiver women learn to look after themselves in my newly released e-book "The Caregiver in MidLife: Where their needs end & yours begin".

     

    Ellen Besso, Writer, Life Coach & MidLife Caregiver

    www.ellenbesso.com

  • Nitpicker
    Mar. 23, 2009

    Genescient has some populations of long lived drosophila because for nearly three decades the males have not been permited to mate until half had died. When they went to see what genes had been up or down regulated compared to wild type fruit flys, they first asked their geneticists to guess how many they would find, they answered a dozen or maybe fifty, but...

    RHMLucky777

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    Genescient has some populations of long lived drosophila because for nearly three decades the males have not been permited to mate until half had died. When they went to see what genes had been up or down regulated compared to wild type fruit flys, they first asked their geneticists to guess how many they would find, they answered a dozen or maybe fifty, but it was almost a thousand of which we share about 700.

     

    Since the flies also suffer from Alzheimer's and these long lived ones postpone the onset, Genescient plans to design a combination of micronutrients to have similar effects on the metabolic pathways which these 700 genes participate in. Perhaps in a year or two we will have a dietary supplement cocktail to put off both Alzheimer's and dementia in humans. There is an interesting problem of how to profit when there is no way to patent a cocktail of GRAS (generally regarded as safe) supplements.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Mar. 05, 2009

    I got absolutely nothing from this article. I still don't know the difference between the two!

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Mar. 05, 2009

      I would still like to know about the other types of Dementias. My mother had a massive bleed in dec 2006. She has since been examied by a nueropsychologist who has estimated her abilities at a third grade level. She has a caregiver in the day and family cares for her at nights. She can recall most pass events but her short term memory  is very poor. Persons...

      RHMLucky777

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      I would still like to know about the other types of Dementias. My mother had a massive bleed in dec 2006. She has since been examied by a nueropsychologist who has estimated her abilities at a third grade level. She has a caregiver in the day and family cares for her at nights. She can recall most pass events but her short term memory  is very poor. Persons need to know more about other dementias also. 

      My family and I support her  tremendously, we love her dearly and would really like to know if other family members are faced with this same issue.

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Apr. 27, 2009

      neither did I, I still have no clue how to tell the difference. My husband suffers from dementia.(Dr's dagnosis) but the Dr's and nurses At the health center say dementia and Alzhemiers are the same thing. So.....which is which???Undecided

    • Anonymous
      Mullika
      Jan. 27, 2010

      Foot in mouth What is there in a name ?

      We have one life lets not get entangled in the research benefits of others .

      Have Almonds soaked in water every night ,good for the brain .Even Ginko Bilboa helps .I am struggling and wirting a book on stress relief .

      My father,a lawyer by profession,  died of Alzheimer's at 82 .There are other lawyers who have had...

      RHMLucky777

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      Foot in mouth What is there in a name ?

      We have one life lets not get entangled in the research benefits of others .

      Have Almonds soaked in water every night ,good for the brain .Even Ginko Bilboa helps .I am struggling and wirting a book on stress relief .

      My father,a lawyer by profession,  died of Alzheimer's at 82 .There are other lawyers who have had the same problem .It may have something to do with too much talking all the time.  Self cure is the best cure. Meditate.Be calm .

      See my You Tube mullikaji

    • Anonymous
      Evie
      Sep. 12, 2010

      I lost my Mother, my Best Friend on May 4,2010.  I was with my Mother every day.  My Dad and myself started to notice how se was forgetting things, I knew something was wrong but, my Dad contibuted to her age.  My Mother retired at the age of 73, she was very witty, sharp as a razor.  It was little things at first, then it progressed. ...

      RHMLucky777

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      I lost my Mother, my Best Friend on May 4,2010.  I was with my Mother every day.  My Dad and myself started to notice how se was forgetting things, I knew something was wrong but, my Dad contibuted to her age.  My Mother retired at the age of 73, she was very witty, sharp as a razor.  It was little things at first, then it progressed.  I took her to the Dr. and he said she had Demetia. My Dad and myself made the decision that if she were to get worse, we wuld take care of her, a nursing home was no option.  Through my experience I watched her go from a Woman who was so dependeant to a woman who needed help. I believe that their are stages of this dreadful disease and the Dr's have no clue on what to do.  She was on Aricept, but she landed in the Hospital due to it. She was put on Namenda but it was too late.  She went trough stages and got worse.  We had the help of Hospice during her final days.  She went from forgetting little things, then she forgot how to dress, wash, go to the bathroom.  At the end she could no longer even support herselfm on her own two legs (she walked 6 miles a day when she was well), someone had told me and I wish I would have asked the gentleman his name, I was talkingn about my Mom and her disease and how they called Dementia, then Alzheimer's and how  did not know how it goes from one to the other, his explanation made so much sense, he said Dementia affects the mind, and that is how the start forgetting things, people, etc., he said the last stage which is Alzheimer;s affects the physical body functions, the kidneys start to stop functioning, they longer knw how to swallow, so there is so nutrition.  My Mom's circulatory functions slowed down, her kidneys started to shut down, her blood pressure started to drop, she slipped into a coma,n her heart rate was 126 the day she left me, he bp was 52/40.  She could not feel ypu touching her from her neck down, only her face.  So my Belief is YES there are 6 stages of dementia and the 7th mis Alzheimer's and that is the end of life stage.  We had an organization called Compasstionate Care Hospice, the name speaks for itself. They are originally from Boston, MA but now have an office in Seekonk, MA.  The booklet they gave me listed every stage there was to the end of life, it could have been more accurate.  I know I am going on and on but, through my experience with my Mother, I have to concluden with, Fact, there are stages of Dementia but the last satge is Alzheimer's and it all depends on the patient, when they ARE READY is when they will leave their loved ones.  I hope this helps, I end this with a broken heart over the loss of my Mother and wish alln who are going through this or who have gone through.  God Bless you all!!!

    • Anonymous
      Evie
      Sep. 12, 2010

      Sorry I made some typo errors, please excuse me.  When I said the booklet could have been more accurate I meant to say THE BOOKLET COULD NOT HAVE BEEN MORE ACCURATE.   I said my Mom retired at the age of 73 which is correct, she left me at the age of 83.  Her disease started in 2007 but not bad, her really bad bad days started on March 6,...

      RHMLucky777

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      Sorry I made some typo errors, please excuse me.  When I said the booklet could have been more accurate I meant to say THE BOOKLET COULD NOT HAVE BEEN MORE ACCURATE.   I said my Mom retired at the age of 73 which is correct, she left me at the age of 83.  Her disease started in 2007 but not bad, her really bad bad days started on March 6, 2010.  Her forgetfullness did start but worsened in 2009 but she was functional, the end of 2009  she got worse.  But when the end was near, she left us fast.  I do state again, everyone is different, but she DID KNOW something was wrong. Be kind to them because they really get upset and cry if they think for a second you are angry at them, I never was but my Dad had a very difficult time with it all, I had to be the strong one and it was not easy.  I wanted her back to who she was but it wasn't meant to be I guess.  Damm that disease, I wish there was a cure, it is a TERRIBLE DISEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Anonymous
      carol
      Sep. 21, 2010

      Thank you for sharing. I learned more from your post then in the article. I have been a  caregiver to my mother-in-law for years. Right now her memory is going fast.  She has dementia and her memory of events well you know. I'm very sorry for your loss and know how much it hurts watching someone you love go through this.

    • Anonymous
      Lisa Geneva
      Oct. 28, 2010

      Hi Evie,  I am sorry for your loss and I can feel your pain and anger towards this disease they called Dementia and then progressed into Alzhiemers for your mother.  My sister has been diagnosed with dementia.  She has severe memory loss and can no longer work as a nurse for the past 2 years.  She is only 57 years old and has been told she...

      RHMLucky777

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      Hi Evie,  I am sorry for your loss and I can feel your pain and anger towards this disease they called Dementia and then progressed into Alzhiemers for your mother.  My sister has been diagnosed with dementia.  She has severe memory loss and can no longer work as a nurse for the past 2 years.  She is only 57 years old and has been told she cant drive either.  She laughs off a lot in public and so she get away with acting "crazy" because people laugh with her and forgive very easily and don't catch on that there is a real problem.  I appreciate when yo said be kind to them, because they dont want for a second to think that you are angry at them.  Your father had a harder time than you.  I have more patience at times with my mother.  She gets angry at my sister.  What I have a hard time with and get angry about is how my sister thinks that things are "hers" in my house when she comes over.  She lived with me for  4 months prior to her getting an apt and she was frequently taking objects of ours into her room, hiding them as if they were hers.  I would go looking and find them hidden.  Now when she visits, she thinks items were left behind that I kept of hers.  I hear it all the time and she becomes insulting about it.  I've been more than patient and have given up items for her to keep for the time being until she finds her own.  The habit continues and we have her over for dinner and music is playing, it triggers this behavior and her mood suddenly changes.  she really believes I've confiscated her belongings.  I've proven that things are not hers, but she just makes up more lies and the argument ensues into a larger one which is useless.  I've come to the conclusion it's just part of this "hoarding" behavior.  What is your take on this behavior?

      Lisa

    • winfloat
      May. 17, 2011

      Hello, I had a stroke about 7 months ago. I was told that I have Gillians and Demensia.I can now walk with a walker and holding someones hand. I can also get out of a car and walk beside it. I can walk with a grocery cart now. I am taking Namenda, Airicept, Prozac, Lopressor And Omleprazole. Every morning I wake up and quote my Social Security #, Address, and...

      RHMLucky777

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      Hello, I had a stroke about 7 months ago. I was told that I have Gillians and Demensia.I can now walk with a walker and holding someones hand. I can also get out of a car and walk beside it. I can walk with a grocery cart now. I am taking Namenda, Airicept, Prozac, Lopressor And Omleprazole. Every morning I wake up and quote my Social Security #, Address, and Phone #. As far as day and date well the news will tell me that. It has been hard. I thankyou for your knowlege. My age is 58. my email is winfloat@yahoo.com I thankyou Again!

    • Linda
      Aug. 02, 2011

      thank you so much!!

       

  • Anonymous
    Student
    Nov. 26, 2008

    I do not understand why others are bashing your site. I found your information simple and to the point - I appreciate that! I found exactly what I needed without having to read a bunch more of medical jargon I wasn't looking for. I tho't you were quite "to the point" and want to thank you for taking the time to write the article.

     

  • Anonymous
    Tammy
    Jun. 23, 2008

    Why doesn't anyone talk about dementia caused from syphillis??  It's always about the alzheimer's disease.  Neurosyphillis is more common now in older people than before.  I would like some information on this condition for once.  My grand mother is 80 years old and she is going down hill very quickly.  Is there anyone else who has...

    RHMLucky777

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    Why doesn't anyone talk about dementia caused from syphillis??  It's always about the alzheimer's disease.  Neurosyphillis is more common now in older people than before.  I would like some information on this condition for once.  My grand mother is 80 years old and she is going down hill very quickly.  Is there anyone else who has a family member with this disease???

  • Anonymous
    david weinstock
    May. 20, 2008

    when my father got sick at age 81, my mother kept saying it is only dementia. after about a year, there were more symptoms. his first sign of dementia was after a bad anesthesia experience during surgery, a few years before. how much did that affect the eventual outcome? we don't know. our family friend, charley had a heart event on vacation in maine. neither...

    RHMLucky777

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    when my father got sick at age 81, my mother kept saying it is only dementia. after about a year, there were more symptoms. his first sign of dementia was after a bad anesthesia experience during surgery, a few years before. how much did that affect the eventual outcome? we don't know. our family friend, charley had a heart event on vacation in maine. neither of the two defibrillators in the hospital worked and they only kept him alive by cpr for ten minutes or so, until they found some machine that worked. after that, charley went right to alzheimer's.

     

    i think people want to call the symptoms 'dementia' because they worry it might be hereditary. for a patient, it sucks, no matter what you call it. my father was always a nice person, but he knew something was wrong and eventually, he had occasional nasty behavior.

     

    i hope the doctors spend our donations on something really effective, not dumbass articles like this.

  • Anonymous
    carol
    Dec. 27, 2007

    I've been taking care of my mother who is 86 now since 1995. She has deteriorated in physical ways..incontinent..blind..can't walk well..but she is very peaceful and participates in laughter around her. I attribute her peacefulness to homepathy. Not herbalism...homeopathy...look for a classical homepath in the area where you live. I can help if you...

    RHMLucky777

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    I've been taking care of my mother who is 86 now since 1995. She has deteriorated in physical ways..incontinent..blind..can't walk well..but she is very peaceful and participates in laughter around her. I attribute her peacefulness to homepathy. Not herbalism...homeopathy...look for a classical homepath in the area where you live. I can help if you can't figure it out.

     

     

  • Anonymous
    carol
    Dec. 27, 2007

    Sorry..this must be beginning alz for me...there were absolutely no adjectives used in my sample of the nuns who didn't get alz...but you get the idea...there writings were more interested in details..etc. But then iris murdoch..the writer...writing all her life with all kinds of details..etc...she got alz.

     

    This is why i think people get alz. they've...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Sorry..this must be beginning alz for me...there were absolutely no adjectives used in my sample of the nuns who didn't get alz...but you get the idea...there writings were more interested in details..etc. But then iris murdoch..the writer...writing all her life with all kinds of details..etc...she got alz.

     

    This is why i think people get alz. they've been independent their whole lives and god or their own souls or whatever want them to learn to let go and be taken care of by others. but ronald regean...he was totally dependent on his wife...so forget that theory. how about..they just want to check out...tired of the whole thing...but they happened to have healthy hearts and aren't about to die...so they just let go of their minds...its a choice.

     

    I could come up with a different theory every hour from now until i forget why i'm writing these theories. 

  • Anonymous
    carol
    Dec. 27, 2007

    Sorry..this must be beginning alz for me...there were absolutely no adjectives used in my sample of the nuns who didn't get alz...but you get the idea...there writings were more interested in details..etc. But then iris murdoch..the writer...writing all her life with all kinds of details..etc...she got alz.

     

    This is why i think people get alz. they've...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Sorry..this must be beginning alz for me...there were absolutely no adjectives used in my sample of the nuns who didn't get alz...but you get the idea...there writings were more interested in details..etc. But then iris murdoch..the writer...writing all her life with all kinds of details..etc...she got alz.

     

    This is why i think people get alz. they've been independent their whole lives and god or their own souls or whatever want them to learn to let go and be taken care of by others. but ronald regean...he was totally dependent on his wife...so forget that theory. how about..they just want to check out...tired of the whole thing...but they happened to have healthy hearts and aren't about to die...so they just let go of their minds...its a choice.

     

    I could come up with a different theory every hour from now until i forget why i'm writing these theories. 

    • Anonymous
      Mullika
      Jan. 27, 2010

       I agree whole heartedly with you.It is very very deep depression. Every case is different. I think some men whose wife dominates them too much also get it,some way of escape in old age!

       Some said if you have coffee you egt it The entire South indian sub continent has only coffee and they are a very very intelligent lot by and large!

  • Anonymous
    carol
    Dec. 27, 2007

    Actually...that had nothing to do with the writing above..but my doctor told me once when i brought my mother in that there was a difference between alz and a stroke...and that stroke victims could be really ****** off at this and that...but the alz. patients were not as angry cause it was affecting a different part of the brain. i guess that also has nothing...

    RHMLucky777

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    Actually...that had nothing to do with the writing above..but my doctor told me once when i brought my mother in that there was a difference between alz and a stroke...and that stroke victims could be really ****** off at this and that...but the alz. patients were not as angry cause it was affecting a different part of the brain. i guess that also has nothing to do with dementia/alz differences.  

     

     

  • Anonymous
    carol
    Dec. 27, 2007
    There was a study in minnesota..of nuns..nuns that got alz and nuns that didn't.  In the end...the same plaques were in the brains of the nuns that didn't get alzheimers as the ones that did. So those plaques are not necessarily the end-all marker for alzheimers. What the study did come up with is that the early writings of the nuns who got alzheimers...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More
    There was a study in minnesota..of nuns..nuns that got alz and nuns that didn't.  In the end...the same plaques were in the brains of the nuns that didn't get alzheimers as the ones that did. So those plaques are not necessarily the end-all marker for alzheimers. What the study did come up with is that the early writings of the nuns who got alzheimers was simple sentences with not much digression from questions asked. Whereas the nuns that didn't get alzheimers were using more adjectives in their writing. For example...I was born in north dakota. my parents came from norway. I was brought up on a farm. In contrast...the nuns who didn't get alz...wrote more like this: I was born in a small farm in the northeastern part of north dakota. It was a dairy farm and we had cow and chickens . All my siblings would have chores. My chore was to blah blah blah. My parents came from norway. they had met at ellis island on the dock as they were getting off the boat. my mother fell off the dock into water and my dad saved her. we heard that story every christmas until we left home. 
  • Anonymous
    reader
    Aug. 31, 2007
    This is one of the most poorly written articles that I have read.  it offers the reader absolutely nothing.  How it got published is beyond me.
  • Patricia Anne Collin
    Aug. 05, 2007

    My husband is 69 and recently was placed on Aricept for MCI.  He was unable to tolerate Aricept due to severe diarhea.  He is now tolerating Exelon well.

    Since my husband sufferred a five day coma ten years ago following CABYS x'6, and a 72 unit bleed, 72 is not a typo...he was never quite the same clinically, especially physically, with some short...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    My husband is 69 and recently was placed on Aricept for MCI.  He was unable to tolerate Aricept due to severe diarhea.  He is now tolerating Exelon well.

    Since my husband sufferred a five day coma ten years ago following CABYS x'6, and a 72 unit bleed, 72 is not a typo...he was never quite the same clinically, especially physically, with some short term memory issues.  He was forced into medical retirement.  However, he is very well educated;his intellect is extremely high, and he has had a very productive successful career. (He is very able to hide his current condition for the most part publicly...at home is a different story.)

    This past year, I experienced him to be more moody; agitated; increased recent memory loss; and impossible to reason or talk through anything to do with emotions, and finances. He can blow up and say cruel things and five minutes later act as though nothing happened.

    I was able to encourage him to see an Internist who ordered a CAT  Scan.  A mass was discovered on the center ventricular of his brain.  He was seen by the Head of Oncology and Neurosurgery at JHH in Baltmore, MD  Apparently the mass is benign and/or an annomaly which we recently discovered was present in 1997 when he had his storke. Although he was not informed he had a mass...neither was the family in 1997.  Johns Hopkins referred him to a Neurologist.  He was fortunate to be able to see the same Neurologist who evaluated him in 1998.  The Neurologist dx. MCI and placed him on Aricept....The dx. of Alzheimers was not verbalized although we all know that Aricept is used to treat Alzheimers as described in the sample packets presented to my husband.

    My husband is doubtful of the Alzheimer's  dx. because of his past medical history. He has decided to seek another evaluation by a Gerontolgist who specializes in Dementia.

    1.  I am struggling as his caretaker to sort how much of this is brain damage stroke related.  Depression? Is the present condition, which has increased in the past year, due to age and earlier clinical insults that is leading to Dementia/Alzheimer's Disease?  Is his condition a combination of all these clinical happenings?  Is there something else we should be doing, or not doing?

    I am trying very hard to support him, but his anxiety and agitation is a real challenge.

    He sees a Psychologist who specializes in ADHD and is pretty clueless about Dementia.   I have seen no progress as a result of this therapy.

    Thank you very much.

     

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Jan. 27, 2010

      Dear Patricia

       

      My father died of Alzheimer's aged 82.

      I fully sympathise with you.I used to give him three almonds soaked in water overnight every morning,and he siad it helped him.There can be no side effects at all. 

      He used to wear a string ofsphatic ( Google search ) around his neck and used to be out of depression. I do the same things .It helps....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Patricia

       

      My father died of Alzheimer's aged 82.

      I fully sympathise with you.I used to give him three almonds soaked in water overnight every morning,and he siad it helped him.There can be no side effects at all. 

      He used to wear a string ofsphatic ( Google search ) around his neck and used to be out of depression. I do the same things .It helps. Also I do breathing exercise coupled with mediattion That is the best thing that has happened to me.See my You Tube anandjee or mullikaji Stress Relief in The Air Force School   where I used to teach.

      We have JUST ONE LIFE  and cannot wait for research and be guniea pigs.

      I hope it helps .

      Laughing

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    May. 19, 2007
    you sir are an idiot

    you read maybe the first paragraph

    the author CLEARLY states that Alzheimers is the most common CAUSE of dementia but that there are other causes as well, so, if you can read English, the answer to the question that forms the title of the article is simply "Alzheimers is one cause of dementia, but not the only one"

    get a clue dude!
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    May. 05, 2007
    This article is poorly written. The reader is trying to learn information that distinguishes Alzheimers dementia from other
    dementias. The author simply repeats that it is not easy to distinguish the dementias.
    • Anonymous
      Marcelo
      Feb. 12, 2009

      Agreed!

    • Anonymous
      petermeter
      Apr. 13, 2010

      so whats really the difference between the two

    • NC
      NC
      Apr. 13, 2010

      Alzheimer's is a type of dementia.

       

      Nina

    • dfortier
      Feb. 10, 2010

      At the risk of further infuriating the highly demanding readers, I would like to partially answer the question posed by the title of this article (What is the diference between Alzheimer's and Dementia?). The description of Alzheimer's is quite clear; it is the concept of dementia that generally drives the question.  I pulled this directly from the Brain...

      RHMLucky777

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      At the risk of further infuriating the highly demanding readers, I would like to partially answer the question posed by the title of this article (What is the diference between Alzheimer's and Dementia?). The description of Alzheimer's is quite clear; it is the concept of dementia that generally drives the question.  I pulled this directly from the Brain Today blog I write.


      Based on the various interpretations I read in the press, there seems to be some confusion about the term dementia. The DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, American Psychiatric Association) provides the most commonly used criteria and defines dementia in this way:

      Dementia is a clinical state characterized by loss of function in multiple cognitive domains. Diagnostic features include : memory impairment and at least one of the following: aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, disturbances in executive functioning. In addition, the cognitive impairments must be severe enough to cause impairment in social and occupational functioning.

      So, in even simpler terms, being demented means that one's mental faculties are impaired to a degree that interferes with their social and occupational function. For the purpose of most discussions, it really is as simple as that.

      The confusion begins when people talk about "being diagnosed with dementia" or "treating dementia". In a world of clarity, those same people would speak instead about "being diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease or with Alzheimer's Disease" which may have led to a clinical state of dementia. No one would "treat dementia", they would treat the underlying medical condition causing the impairment that we describe as dementia. It is a simple concept but I hear it confused (or read about it being confused) on a daily basis.

      We don't need to detect dementia, we need to detect medical conditions that lead to dementia. We cannot treat dementia, we must treat medical conditions that cause dementia. The word dementia merely describes the extent of some person's cognitive impairment.

    • Anonymous
      sue53
      Mar. 06, 2011

      thanks so much for clearing this up for me.  So many people, caregivers, etc. are very confused about this subject.  My dads doctor told him that he had Alzheimers a while ago.  I don't see it, but I live 1,000 miles away and I haven't seen him in almost 2 years, but a week ago he was driving and forgot where the break was.  Scarey Stuff....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      thanks so much for clearing this up for me.  So many people, caregivers, etc. are very confused about this subject.  My dads doctor told him that he had Alzheimers a while ago.  I don't see it, but I live 1,000 miles away and I haven't seen him in almost 2 years, but a week ago he was driving and forgot where the break was.  Scarey Stuff.

    • sue53
      Mar. 06, 2011

      thanks so much for clearing this up for me.  So many people, caregivers, etc. are very confused about this subject.  My dads doctor told him that he had Alzheimers a while ago.  I don't see it, but I live 1,000 miles away and I haven't seen him in almost 2 years, but a week ago he was driving and forgot where the break was.  Scarey Stuff....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      thanks so much for clearing this up for me.  So many people, caregivers, etc. are very confused about this subject.  My dads doctor told him that he had Alzheimers a while ago.  I don't see it, but I live 1,000 miles away and I haven't seen him in almost 2 years, but a week ago he was driving and forgot where the break was.  Scarey Stuff.

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