A Historic Moment: Improving Lifestyle May Decrease Alzheimer’s by 50 percent

Dharma S Khalsa, MD Health Guide September 06, 2011
  • Dear Friend:

     

    As you may have heard, a recent announcement at the International Conference on Alzheimer's disease hosted by the Alzheimer's Association in Paris, France, states that the prevention of cognitive decline is now within reach. This statement has drawn an enthusiastic response from many industry leaders.  The ARPF is among those quick to affirm the news. As you may recall, in 1993, we were the first to begin this pioneering prevention research work.

     

    I'm thrilled that the Alzheimer's Association and others have joined our prevention camp. When I first started speaking publicly about Alzheimer's prevention, I wasn't the most popular physician in the room. But science has always been on our side, and I was patiently optimistic that the conventional medical establishment would embrace the concept one day. Listening to the news that the other experts now agree with me that with lifestyle measures, we can reduce the number of people who develop Alzheimer's by as much as 50 percent is validating - not of me personally, but of the science that we have been promoting for many years.

     

    The ARPF's Four Pillars of PreventionTM represent the state-of-the-art of a lifestyle approach, which is now the mainstream method to reducing your risk factors for the development of this terrible disease.

     

    In addition, our meditative memory exercise known as Kirtan Kriya has been vigorously studied by the ARPF in concert with scientists at top medical schools, and its findings have been published in leading medical journals. Our research shows that Kirtan Kriya, when practiced only 12 minutes a day, strengthens your brain, increases blood flow to it, and reverses established memory loss.  

     

    Moreover, our innovative research has also revealed a reduction in inflammation, less depression, and a 44 percent increase in the enzyme known as telomerase, which is a breakthrough anti-aging discovery. When you have more telomerase, you have longer telomeres, part of your DNA, and that means you live longer in better health and with an improved memory.

     

    Now that it appears there is growing consensus around the potential of prevention, we all need to work together to educate the public. Our message is one of hope and optimism. There are things that you can do right now to stimulate your brain, make it younger and stronger, and improve your memory with age.

     

    We owe it to ourselves, as well as to our children and grandchildren, to join forces to empower everyone to make lifestyle modifications so they'll enjoy a long life with a clear and vital mind.

     

    Now is the time.

     

    Please join us in this hopeful and optimistic movement!

     

     

    Sincerely yours,

     

    Dharma Singh Khalsa, M.D.

    Founding President/Medical Director
    Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation

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