Not cooking up a storm

Leah Health Guide
  • On Sunday, I decided to cook for my husband.  I had watched for green peppers to come on sale so I could make him his favorite stuffed peppers.  I bought four, got some hamburger...and couldn't remember what else went into it.  Forgot to look at a recipe before I went to the store...

    Back to Sunday.  I got out a recipe.  Now, I have a great deal of trouble following recipes anymore as I can't remember what I am getting (or how much) from one side of the kitchen to the other...  And, since I hadn't made a list before going to the store, I had to "wing it" with whatever supplies I had on hand.  Luckily, I had just enough brown rice, though I had never made it with that kind before.  And, I had cooked too much meat, so the rest of the recipe had to be tweaked to accommodate that increase... 

    Add This Infographic to Your Website or Blog With This Code:

    Well, I had forgotten how much work really goes into this recipe and that the process for someone with dementia and a short attention span and no short term memory could be overwhelming.  At one point, my husband came into the kitchen, took one look at me (I must have looked afright with my hair disheveled and muttering to myself), and asked, with some alarm, what was wrong.  All I could answer was, "I didn't remember how much work this was and how hard it is to keep it going.  There are so many steps!"  And, what I was feeling was fatique and overwhelmed.  No matter how hard I tried to take it step by step, the end never seemed to be in sight... 

    I did perservere, though.  Got it all put together--FINALLY--never having sampled it to see if it was edible.  Went to lay down for awhile...

    Once I got up, I heated the oven to heat the stuffed peppers.  I could not believe how good they tasted.  My husband loved them enough to take them for lunch the next day.  I do believe he understands the difficulty I am experiencing and appreciates how I try to keep going.  And that only makes me love him even more.

    Cooking used to be a passion of mine.  Now, following a recipe is agony for me.  I don't like what dementia is doing to me.  But I will not let it stop me without a fight.  It would be much easier, in some aspects, to give in and give up.  But I believe that would make me even unhappier.  I prefer to see this dementia as a handicap, much like a missing limb or something--a handicap that requires more effort by me to accomplish the same thing as a normal person--a handicap that just slows me down some, but doesn't stop me.  Unfortunately, people around me might understand my limitations better if I had a missing limb.  Dementia is not something easily seen at times, nor easily understood.  Especially, I suppose, in the beginning.

     

     

Published On: August 28, 2007