A Memory Aid To Help Short Term Memory Loss

Leah Health Guide
  • Disclaimer:  I have no financial interest in the product that I am going to describe to you.  I present it only in consumer interest.  It may be something that would be of benefit to those who have short term memory loss or who know someone with that disability.

     

     

    I am always looking for new ways to help make my life with short term memory loss easier and more productive.  Two of the most difficult areas is remembering to eat and to take my medications and insulin.  For those who do not have short term memory loss, it may sound funny that I forget to eat.  After all, wouldn’t my tummy rumble?  Well, it might rumble…I’ve never noticed…just like I don’t notice the house is a mess…or that my gas tank is getting low…or that I have clothes in the washer/dryer…  I suppose it is due partly to my short attention span.  Sometimes, I do remember to eat, but when I go to the kitchen to fix my meal, something else catches my attention…the laptop may call me or there may be a squirrel on my deck…and quick as a wink—I forget I need to eat!  The same thing holds true for taking my meds and insulin…

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    With that in mind, I sought a solution.  My many friends and readers gave me lots of good ideas.  One was to program my cell phone to go off.  That wasn’t good for me, as I do not wear my cell phone so the alarm would never be heard by me.  Another idea was to set the clock on the stove.  Again, unless I’m in the kitchen, I wouldn’t hear it.  A really good idea was to set the house phone to call myself, but I hate answering the phone and am afraid of what I would do to the poor defenseless thing over time…

     

    I found what I believe to be the best solution while perusing the internet.  I googled (don’t I love Mr. Google!) “medication alarm watch” and found the Cadex site.  They offer a watch which can be converted into a pendant and has twelve alarms, plus will hold emergency information, etc.  After going to several sites, I opted to order the watch from Cadex.  (It is possible to find the watch a little cheaper if you dig into other sites, but they didn’t offer the pendant conversion.)  I ordered the watch and conversion kit.  It arrived in less than a week.

     

    Now, with me having dementia, following directions isn’t always very easy.  Using new-fangled contraptions isn’t either.  However, I am very pleased so far with my pendant watch.  The directions for setting it were written clearly and in larger print.  I do admit to having to read them every time over and over to set each alarm, etc., but it wasn’t hard!  Just a little time consuming.  There are only four main buttons to push which are clearly marked.  You can also get directions off the Cadex site, as well as a video showing how to convert the watch into a pendant. 

     

    Once set, I have been waiting since this morning and have just heard my first alarm go off—which I ignored in order to keep writing this piece.  However, my little pendant does not give up.  It continues to remind me every three minutes to take my Humalog.  Once I’ve taken my insulin, I will just press one of two buttons (my choice) and it resets itself for the next alarm.

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     IT WORKS!  I am going to fix lunch and take my shot…and if I forget what I’m supposed to do, all I have to do is look down and read my pendant.  I’ll work with this for a few days and let you know how effective it is.  Right now, I need to eat…

     

Published On: July 18, 2008