• Brian Mann Brian Mann
    January 10, 2013
    My wife has vascular dementia and constantly scratches an area on her scalp breaking away an area of hair. Is this common to dementia?:
    Brian Mann Brian Mann
    January 10, 2013

FROM OUR EXPERTS

  • Christine Kennard
    Health Pro
    January 10, 2013
    Christine Kennard
    Health Pro
    January 10, 2013

    HI Mr Mann

     

    I am sorry to hear your wife is focusing on her scalp and damaging her hair when she scratches it.

    Skin picking is a comparatively common type of behaviour in people with various types of dementia. It is, as Carol says, important to get a accurate diagnosis to exclude skin conditions and diseases, side effects to any medication she may be on that can cause itching, and a number of other diseases that may contribute to skin picking.

     

    Because people with dementia have increasing trouble expressing themselves and their needs it is important for caregivers to try to interpret the behavior. In that way it can often be stopped by redirect their attention to more satisfying passtime.

     

    In studies caregivers report a number of causes for this type of behaviour. It is variously described as one that diminishes anxiety, as an attempt to gain,  control, be involved in a meaningful activity, and as a means  to gain social contact with others.

     

    The behavior will change as her dementia progresses, but it is worth redirecting her to activities she enjoys and increase your interactions with her at these times.

     

    I hope this is helpful

     

    Alll my best wishes

    Christine

     

    • Brian Mann
      January 10, 2013
      Brian Mann
      January 10, 2013

      Dear Christine

      Thanks for your reply and your valued advice. We have been discussing the subject at our Memory Cafe' this afternoon and it seem to be a fairly common activity. I really appreciate your input and will share your advice with the Cafe' at the next meeting.

      Best wishes

      Brian Mann

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    • Christine Kennard
      January 11, 2013
      Christine Kennard
      Health Pro
      January 11, 2013

      Hi Brian

       

      I am so pleased that you have a forum to share tips to improve the care of loved ones with dementia. The Memory Cafe sounds such a great, friendly way of doing that. All my best wishes to you and your friends there.

       

      Christine

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    • Brian Mann
      January 11, 2013
      Brian Mann
      January 11, 2013

      Dear Christine

      Thank you so much for your interest, we use a Memory Cafe' in Lostwithiel in Cornwall and their format is to provide activities for the "sufferers"(for want of a better description) after introductory tea & cake etc and then to seperate the carers for a discussion group meeting and to bring along specialist on various subjects from time to time. As a carer I find this the most useful source of help and assistance that I can find. The Lostwithiel format has proved to be very popular and is being used as a model by other groups forming in the area, needless to say that it's popularity is attracting people such as myself from outlying towns like St Austell, Liskeard etc and even Plymouth.

      I thought this may interest you as you are so involved yourself.

      Best wishes abd kind regards

      Brian Mann

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  • AFA Social Services
    Health Guide
    January 11, 2013
    AFA Social Services
    Health Guide
    January 10, 2013

    Your wife has a vascular dementia. Vascular dementia is also known as multi-infarct dementia.  This type of dementia is caused by blockages in the brain’s blood supply. Vascular dementia can be caused by a series of mini-strokes that cause damage to the brain over and over again.  The damage caused to the brain can cause symptoms such as confusion and agitation, problems with language and memory, unsteady gait, causing falls, urinary frequency, urgency or incontinence, personality and mood changes. 

     

    You inquired if your wife’s behavior of constantly scratching her scalp is a common behavior with those with dementia. Every individual who has this disease is different, although some can experience repetitive anxious behaviors, like your wife. Since she is scratching her scalp causing hair damage, I would seek medical consultation, to rule out if this behavior is due to a medical condition. First, have her evaluated by her primary physician, and that doctor can refer her to a dermatologist if this is deemed a skin issue. Your wife’s condition can be serious and extends beyond the aesthetic. If your wife has open sores on scalp and picks at her skin with dirty hands, she can introduce an infection into her body, which can be hazardous to her health. You should also consider behavioral interventions to distract her with in the meanwhile. If she is kept busy, and she is allowed to expend her energy in a safe, healthy manner, she may not spend her time picking at her scalp. Find activities that you think she may like, which will require the use of her hands. Folding, gardening, mixing cooking ingredients, and coloring are good examples. In addition, you can put hand mittens on her along with keeping her nails short, to decrease her from scratching her scalp. Combining medical and behavioral interventions will hopefully decrease or stop her scratching altogether. 

    • Brian Mann
      January 11, 2013
      Brian Mann
      January 11, 2013

      Thank you for your very useful information I will act upon it to try to resolve the problem.

      Best wishes

      Brian Mann

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  • Carol Bradley Bursack
    Health Guide
    January 10, 2013
    Carol Bradley Bursack
    Health Guide
    January 10, 2013

    Hi Brian,

    People with dementia will often pick at something that is bothering them. My mother-in-law would pick her skin until it became infected. It's was a challenge to keep them covered and comfortable so they'd heal. It seems to be an obsessive/compulsive behavior.

    I'd ask a dermatologist about something for her scalp which may itch. Scalp itching can be caused by lack of B vitamins as well as dandruff and other issues. There’s an over-the-counter product for itchy scalp called Scalpicin, and a weak vinegar solution can help some people, but it’s best to check with a dermatologist first.

    I'd also ask the doctor in charge of her dementia is there's anything he or she can suggest. If your wife can be distracted from this habit for awhile, and any itching is stopped, she may quit.

    Take care,

    Carol

     

     

    • Brian Mann
      January 10, 2013
      Brian Mann
      January 10, 2013

      Dear Carol

      Thanks  for your advice the scratching has only caused broken hair so far and not damaged the skin but it is clear that it could develop that way. I'll follow your suggestions and hope we can improve the situation.

      Best wishes

      Brian Mann

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