• Happy0ne Happy0ne
    January 24, 2010
    I "black out" during times of stress or anxiety.I function but forget periods of time.
    Happy0ne Happy0ne
    January 24, 2010

    Is stress of anxiety the cause of these "black outs"?

    READ MORE

FROM OUR EXPERTS

  • Eileen Bailey
    Health Guide
    January 25, 2010
    Eileen Bailey
    Health Guide
    January 24, 2010

    Thank you for your question and welcome to AnxietyConnection.com.

     

    I am not a medical professional and would not be able to give you medical advice.

     

    It is possible for people to experience blackouts or fainting during times of high stress and anxiety. However, these can also be symptoms of some medical conditions as well.

     

    I would suggest contacting your doctor. He or she would be able to determine if your symptoms are being caused by a medical condition or if you have an anxiety disorder.

     

    If you do have an anxiety disorder, your doctor, or mental health provider, would be able to work with you to set up a treatment plan.

     

    Eileen

  • Jerry Kennard
    Health Pro
    January 25, 2010
    Jerry Kennard
    Health Pro
    January 24, 2010

    Hi

     

    Thanks for your question. I notice you express "black out" in a way that suggests you don't actually lose consciousness - is this accurate? Clearly if you are losing consciousness you need a neurological assessment from your doctor.

     

    Assuming however you are describing a sense or a symptom of high anxiety then this is a bit different. You don't mention whether you are taking medication for anxiety. Memory loss is a side effect of a group of medicines known as benzodiazepines. Suppression of memory during moments of high tension, stress or anxiety is not unknown and it's just possible that you have developed a coping mechanism to help you get through the worst moments. Memory is a strange thing in that we tend to recall things quite well - the problem comes when we attempt to retrive them.

     

    I'm not sure from your question how extensive or frequent a problem this is. If you feel it isn't interfering with your life (and you've ruled out the meds and black-outs previously mentioned) then it may be something to live with. The more things like this start to worry us, the greater the chance they develop into something bigger.

     

    As a psychologist it would be an oversight if I didn't mention psychological therapies. If you haven't considered this it may be worth doing so.


FROM OUR COMMUNITY

You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Content posted by community members does not necessarily reflect the views of Remedy Health Media, which also reserves the right to remove material deemed inappropriate.