Related Conditions

5 Things to Avoid While Coping With Agoraphobia

Eileen Bailey Jun 27th, 2013 (updated Jan 7th, 2014)
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Agoraphobia is the fear of being in places or situations where escape is difficult or impossible. This may be in crowded places, on bridges or in confined spaces. Approximately one-third of those with panic disorder develop agoraphobia, often experiencing fear revolving around places or situations where they have previously had panic attacks.

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Caffeine
Caffeine

You might like the feeling of alertness and focus that caffeine creates, but caffeine can have the following adverse effects: nervousness, agitation, sleeping problems, anxiety and irritability. If you aren’t willing to eliminate caffeine, try to limit to one cup of coffee or one caffeinated drink per day.

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Alcohol
Alcohol

While it may make you feel better for a little while, alcohol is a depressant. It can increase feelings of hopelessness and depression. Alcohol may also interfere with sleep; it may be easier to fall asleep after drinking alcohol, but the quality of sleep may be poorer. Lack of proper sleep can increase anxiety.

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Denial or Avoidance of Treatment
Denial or Avoidance of Treatment

A mental health professional can work with you in reviewing your treatment options. Start with your family doctor and ask for a referral to a specialist who can help. Avoiding treatment or denying that you are avoiding situations because of your panic attacks may cause you to withdrawal from friends, family and daily activities.

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Withdrawal
Withdrawal

As the fear of different places takes hold, it is easy to begin to withdrawal and isolate yourself. Just as treatment is important, so is the support of friends and family. Sharing what is going on and asking for help is a healthy way to cope with symptoms of agoraphobia. Let friends and family know what type of support and encouragement is most helpful.

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Negative Thinking and Feeling Sorry for Yourself
Negative Thinking and Feeling Sorry for Yourself

Becoming a victim of your anxiety often brings about negative thoughts and feeling sorry for yourself. Instead, make a commitment to learn strategies to control your anxiety and your life. Make time for fun activities with friends and work on stress-relief techniques to help you relax and enjoy life.