Saturday, September 20, 2014

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 karen, Community Member, asks

Q: ADVAIR AND NEBULIZER USED TOGEATHER WHY?

WHY DOE A PERSON HAVE TO USE A NEBULIZER BESIDE ADVAIR?

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Answers (4)
John Bottrell, Health Pro
4/15/10 2:29pm

The above response is right on.  The only thing I'd add to this is that while medicines like Advair and Symbicort are meant to control asthma, all asthmatics should still have on hand rescue medicine on hand at all times. Some asthmatics have nebulizers, although most simply have a rescue inhaler like Albuterol.

 

Ideally, if controller medicines like Advair are doing the job of controlling your ashtma, you shouldn't need to to use your nebulizer or rescue inhaler very often.  Again, however, it still may be a good idea to have this medicine on hand in case you need it.

 

As mentioned above, your asthma doctor may have other ideas, which is why it's always a good idea to pose such questions to your doctor.  

 

 

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nscangal, Community Member
4/14/10 12:47pm

You should speak to a doctor or pharmacist to confirm this, as I'm not a medical professional.


That said, Advair contains two types of medicines: an inhaled steroid (fluticasone propionate, the same stuff as in Flovent) and an inhaled long-acting bronchodialator, or LABA (salmeterol, which I believe is the same stuff as in Serevent). The inhaled steroid treats the inflammation in your lungs, while the inhaled long-acting bronchodialator prevents the muscles in your airways from spasming. Together, they're designed to prevent asthma attacks.

 

Nebulizers are devices used to get inhaled medications into your lungs. Typically, asthmatics use them to deliver rescue medication (such as salbutamol or albuterol, both of which are common names for the drug in Ventolin, which is a common rescue medication). Rescue medications are typically short-acting bronchodialators, designed to make your airways relax quickly and stop an ongoing attack.

 

If you don't understand why you've been prescribed your current medications in your current doses, or when you should take them, you should speak with a pharmacist or doctor to clear things up. Don't worry if you think you're imposing - it's their job to make sure that you know how to manage your health! Also, typically prescriptions come with patient information inserts that you can read and might help to explain things to you.

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Alley, Community Member
4/14/10 2:59pm

get over urself jeeze bii i love u all

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John Bottrell, Health Pro
4/15/10 2:29pm

The above response is right on.  The only thing I'd add to this is that while medicines like Advair and Symbicort are meant to control asthma, all asthmatics should still have on hand rescue medicine on hand at all times. Some asthmatics have nebulizers, although most simply have a rescue inhaler like Albuterol.

 

Ideally, if controller medicines like Advair are doing the job of controlling your ashtma, you shouldn't need to to use your nebulizer or rescue inhaler very often.  Again, however, it still may be a good idea to have this medicine on hand in case you need it.

 

As mentioned above, your asthma doctor may have other ideas, which is why it's always a good idea to pose such questions to your doctor.  

 

 

Reply
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By karen, Community Member— Last Modified: 12/26/10, First Published: 04/14/10