talking about bipolar disorder

Living with bipolar type 2

Therese Community Member April 07, 2007
  • From what I understand, bipolar type two is easier to live with than type one. For that I'm thankful. The diagnosis of bipolar is a tough one. I mean, look at me - I'm a student, mom, wife, choir member, performer. I can't be mentally ill. Am I mentally ill? What is mental illness anyway? I'm not ready to throw in the towel. The ill part I can see somewhat. Physically, I tire easily and, honestly, I don't feel that good. But I'm not some weirdo. And that's just it. People who have mental illness aren't weirdos. They are just like everyone else. What I mean is that everyone has something that he or she deals with on a daily basis. For me, it's bipolar and autism. (My kids and spouse are on the autistic spectrum.) If I can deal with those things, I can do anything. The trick is, I think anyway, to deal with them one day at a time. Sometimes a whole day is too overwhelming and so it's an hour at a time. That's okay. It's not like I'm hiding my head in the sand. I'm dealing with my "stuff."

    I don't know if that's useful to anyone but I hope it is.

    Please feel free to comment and I will be happy to talk to anyone going through this.

    I'm no expert but I am a sympathetic listener.

10 Comments
  • crazygirl
    Jan. 29, 2011

    sometimes it all overwhelms me.  I have been ok and I have been really bad, but what I fear is that I will never be ok forever, it will always be followed by really bad.  I take things moment by moment too, but I'm so tired...and I don't have the strength to keep up the fight.  Any words of wisdom?

  • Anonymous
    matt
    Sep. 21, 2010

    Hi,

     

    I've just been diagnosed with Type 2 bipolar. I'm a 36 year old professional male. It's a releif in a way knowing that there is a reason for my moods etc, I now feel like I have mountain to climb. I am very concerened about taking medication, I want to explore all natural therapies first. Can you guys offer any advice?

     

    Thanks,

     

    Matt

    • lady behind the mask
      Jan. 29, 2011

      Hi Matt. I didn't see any responses, but maybe you've found some helpful info by now. I'm also BPII, diagnosed at 42. The most important thing, to me, is finding a doctor you are confident in. Not everyone can be simply treated with one pill and then its done. For me, it took a number of years of trying various combinations of different meds -- ultimately we'd...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Hi Matt. I didn't see any responses, but maybe you've found some helpful info by now. I'm also BPII, diagnosed at 42. The most important thing, to me, is finding a doctor you are confident in. Not everyone can be simply treated with one pill and then its done. For me, it took a number of years of trying various combinations of different meds -- ultimately we'd tried 21 meds, and I ended up taking small amounts of five different ones daily because I turned out ot be hypersensitive to side effects. But at this point, I'm in pretty good shape. Best to you!

  • Anonymous
    morela facchinei
    Mar. 19, 2009

    I will say that being bipolar makes me more human and though is difficult sometimes people usually appreciate my perspectie of life. Nobody is perfect and we all hae to do our best for others and also for ourseles. (Not all the letters in this computer work). I hae a job at the moment not the one my family would like me to hae according to what they consider...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I will say that being bipolar makes me more human and though is difficult sometimes people usually appreciate my perspectie of life. Nobody is perfect and we all hae to do our best for others and also for ourseles. (Not all the letters in this computer work). I hae a job at the moment not the one my family would like me to hae according to what they consider my talents are, that used to stress me because I wanted to do more always and I didnt feel like it. My best resource now are my friends and the beauty I see in them and all around me. Most people are good, a lot of people are confused its not only part of a condition. A lot of people are searching for the same and feel empty with their life. I feel that being myself and letting people know  I can be fragile and need their support make me feel more accepted than if I try to deny and hide things. I'm an honest person and I would like to be remembered this way all my life. Now my only goal in life is to find peace within myself. I don't want to expect too much from others friendship for me is the best word eer written in the human dictionary. If anything wrong happen in my life I want to beliee someone will be there to gie me a smile. That means the world to me.

    Thanks for your words.

    A hug

    Morela

    • Anonymous
      newly diagnosed
      May. 27, 2009

       After 20 years of counseling and knowing that something was wrong my doctor of 7 years diagnosed me with bipolar type 2. She said it can take a very long time to diagnose because so many other things have to be ruled out first that are similar and parallel. The meds, signs and symptoms all seem to fit the puzzle perfectly.

       I have spent the past...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

       After 20 years of counseling and knowing that something was wrong my doctor of 7 years diagnosed me with bipolar type 2. She said it can take a very long time to diagnose because so many other things have to be ruled out first that are similar and parallel. The meds, signs and symptoms all seem to fit the puzzle perfectly.

       I have spent the past few months changing and adjusting meds along with accepting the diagnosis. I am a nurse and gave up my profession when the panic attacks were so bad that I no longer trusted myself. I blamed it on the stress at home caring for a diabetic daughter who was into sports 24-7. Also, I grew up with a parent who I believed was a type 1 bipolar, but had no proof except his behavior. We would call him Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde. He and my mother both drank. I am grateful that I do not drink and haven't for about 2 years now. I was a holiday 1 or 2 glass of wine girl. Now I have no interest at all.

      I fought for 2 decades for answers to so many things in my past and why I felt the way I did. Until it became suicidal ideation and strong panic with deep depression over a period of time (years) everyone just thought I was a career oriented energetic woman before that. I would say that was my hypomanic phase. Now I don't know what to do with myself. I will never return to nursing and can only work part time.

       My children will be leaving the house for college and their first apartment. Both are leaving within 3 months of each other. I have become very creative over the past 3 years, but have isolated myself pretty well. I am happy for the kids to go...it is definitely time!!!! My husband and I are eager for their new lives to start. But, I'm not sure what to do with myself and my new condition. The despair is gone, which is wonderful, my husband is glad we have an answer and that I worked so hard to get myself better and never gave up, but what's the next step?????

  • Anonymous
    karatek
    Feb. 17, 2009

    I agree with your statement that I am not a wierdo. I'm a normal person dealing with the effects of this disease. I am only starting to realize its extent. I know now that I've been dealing with this since giving birth to my first child in 2003. Had I know then what I know now perhaps I'd have gotten the help I needed back then. However it took a life...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I agree with your statement that I am not a wierdo. I'm a normal person dealing with the effects of this disease. I am only starting to realize its extent. I know now that I've been dealing with this since giving birth to my first child in 2003. Had I know then what I know now perhaps I'd have gotten the help I needed back then. However it took a life altering event (going into great debt) to figure out I need extreme help. I'm getting the meds and therapy I need but could've used years ago had I just given up the control. Please if you think you are sinking but don't know where to turn please go to your health care support center and get therapy/pschologist help. Its worth the money and effort you exert. You and your family will benifit in the long run. God bless, Kari

  • Anonymous
    me
    Jan. 21, 2008
    That is exactly how I feel and it's so nice to see someone else put it in writing....yes sometimes the thought of the whole day can set off a hundred different emtions all at once and yes I need to look at each hour more often to avoid feeling manic.  And your right I am not a weirdo....I am an Executive/Personal Assistant, volunteer, friend, I have...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More
    That is exactly how I feel and it's so nice to see someone else put it in writing....yes sometimes the thought of the whole day can set off a hundred different emtions all at once and yes I need to look at each hour more often to avoid feeling manic.  And your right I am not a weirdo....I am an Executive/Personal Assistant, volunteer, friend, I have a fairly good life with good friends and loving parents.  I had a major brain injury on July 10th 1999 from falling 50 feet off a cliff while rockclimbing, no halmet....I was a miracle and didn't die....I should have been a paralyzed...but I didn't even break a bone......the next 7 years was me struggling in my brain to fix myself to avoid admitting something might be wrong with me that I cannot fix myself.  I finally went to the doctor after years of depressed, sucide thoughts, manic moods up and down...the list goes on, but I finally got help and I am on medication.  I see a doctor weekly and after a year of treatment my life is coming together.  I am much better on medication and now it doesn't bother me to have to take  medication for the rest of my life......because I feel like the me I was before the accident......and I almost forgot who she was. 
  • Bob Brandt
    Apr. 14, 2007

    This is how I live with BiPolar. I manage it.  I deal with it.  I get on with my life.  You can too!

     

    Bi-Polar is a condition that can be managed.  Key factors for my successful management are medication (I'm still hoping to manage w/o them some day), EXERCISE is vital (at least 3 to 4 days per week 20 - 30 minutes cardio...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    This is how I live with BiPolar. I manage it.  I deal with it.  I get on with my life.  You can too!

     

    Bi-Polar is a condition that can be managed.  Key factors for my successful management are medication (I'm still hoping to manage w/o them some day), EXERCISE is vital (at least 3 to 4 days per week 20 - 30 minutes cardio and light weight resitance), active reprogramming of my thinking, nutritional supplementation, paying attention to my dietary triggers, and getting enough sunlight. 

     

    My medication mix is Concerta 18mg, Lamictal 200mg & Stratera 12 mg per day.  Mixed med therapy seems to have been the best approach for me.  I started with Lithium many years ago, but that clouded my thinking.  After that I was on a 4 year journey until I arrived at this mix of meds. 

     

    I exercise a minimum of 3 days per week (try to do 4 days). I swim laps 30 to 40 minutes, or do light weight resistance training followed by cardio exercise. 

     

    I work to reprogram my thinking with positive affirmations, reading inspirational books, and watching inspirational movies. A good resource I’ve found to retrain my thinking is listening to couple audio CD's I found at www.thinkrightnow.com while in the car or while sleeping at night. 

     

    I have found EPA (fish oil)and B12 to be helpful along with some other nutritional supplements as well.

     

    Pay attention to what you eat and what triggers your depression. One of my biggest triggers is eggs. I know I will be down for at least 24 hours after eating them and sometimes I don’t mind and eat them anyway. It’s a choice. Know what your food triggers are and deal with them appropriately.

     

    My Bi-polar is further complicated with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder).  So another important piece of the puzzle for me is sunlight.  I go to the tanning booth on average 1 day per week, never more than 2 weeks without. 

     

    My BiPolar Management Program In Summary: 

     

    1) Medication experimentation (with doctors help) until I got it right. 

     

    2) EXERCISE, EXERCISE, EXERCISE. 

     

    3) Retrain my thinking. http://www.thinkrightnow.com

     

    4) Nutritional supplementation. 

     

    5) Pay attention to my dietary triggers. 

     

    6) When necessary, getting sunlight.

     

    Feel free to correspond with me anytime.  I'm happy to

    help in any way I can.

     

    Bob Brandt

    Yahoo IM:  bobbrandtchicago

    bbrandt1612@comcast.net

     

    http://2-b.us/?i=109681/BiPolarConnect.com

     

    • Valerie
      Nov. 12, 2011

      Thank you Therese, I am the mother of 23 yr old son diagnosised with Type2. Getting the diaginosis and surrounding him with professionals to aid in treatment has been difficult to say the least.  People speaking out, not hiding in closets is helpful and hopeful.

    • Valerie
      Nov. 12, 2011

      Thank you Therese, I am the mother of 23 yr old son diagnosised with Type2. Getting the diaginosis and surrounding him with professionals to aid in treatment has been difficult to say the least.  People speaking out, not hiding in closets is helpful and hopeful.