Spring - My mania's favorite time of year

monica22 Community Member April 25, 2008
  • I remember my first mania, that led to my diagnosis, was in the spring. New life, the return of warm weather and the flowers blooming all culminated in an experience so rich and overwhelming for me I think I just snapped. When this happened again the next year despite the meds and therapy, I knew I had to come to grips with nature on my own terms because I couldn't fear the end of winter every year. I even stopped planting flowers for a few years because literally my garden seemed magical to me and it messed with my head. Well, it's been 19 Springs since that initial meltdown and I'm marveling at the renewing earth perfectly sane. The difference for me lies in not shutting out one or the other explanation for why nature touches me so deeply. Yes, chemically I am capable of deep thought and contemplation that can cause elation and joy outside the realm of "normal." I accept that and take daily medication to level off the mood swings. But I also have a soul that is connected to the universe as a whole and to deny those feelings of connectedness is to deny myself. This Fall I planted bulbs with the intention of watching them bloom in the Spring. I am happy to report the shoots are coming through the ground right on schedule. I on the other hand, am not shooting up anywhere and am quite grounded. I'd love to hear from any seasonal mood swingers who may have had a similar experience.

    Monica

2 Comments
  • Michael
    Apr. 26, 2008

    ....again, noteworthy to point out how the physiological symptoms of bipolar disorder is so very intertwined in our emotional, psychological self. This would appear to be the case given the nature of the symptoms of this disorder - a manifestation of emotional, psychological symptoms - however, the pharaceutical industry, and psychiatrists who are wrapped...

    RHMLucky777

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    ....again, noteworthy to point out how the physiological symptoms of bipolar disorder is so very intertwined in our emotional, psychological self. This would appear to be the case given the nature of the symptoms of this disorder - a manifestation of emotional, psychological symptoms - however, the pharaceutical industry, and psychiatrists who are wrapped up in neuroscientific study, have wanted us to trust in medical solutions over all else - a very dangerous strategy, IMHO.

    • Michael
      Apr. 26, 2008

      ... my comment comes out of the fact that Monica's post draws attention to how this disorder, and its triggers, are so very much situational/psychological. Given this, we need to understand how physiological solutions to the disorder are only "tempering agents."