schizophrenia

paranoid thinking

Rose Community Member January 09, 2008
  • I'm tired of having to second guess everything out of my paranoid thinking.  I think I'm fine and then something comes along and I freak, thinking, "Does this person hate me?  What did I do?  Have I been shunned to the outside?"  It can be very disturbing to me.  I need to have a social network, but negative thoughts intrude.  It cuts down on my self confidence.  I become sad, worried, and frightened.  I feel pathetic for letting it take control like it does, but if I was free of the paranoia that is a part of this illness, I wouldn't have these problems.  It's disturbing.  I wonder if anyone else gets these symptoms.
12 Comments
  • cb
    cb
    Feb. 28, 2010

    Paranoia and second-guessing myself are phenomena that I'm uncertain are related to bipolar.  If you talk to some people you'll find an undercurrent of second-guessing that almost seems to be part of the human condition.  But, I don't know.  There have been countless times when I thought FOR SURE that people were scheming against me.  That...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Paranoia and second-guessing myself are phenomena that I'm uncertain are related to bipolar.  If you talk to some people you'll find an undercurrent of second-guessing that almost seems to be part of the human condition.  But, I don't know.  There have been countless times when I thought FOR SURE that people were scheming against me.  That I was psychic and I felt that they were hatching plots against me.  Is this what you are experiencing Rose?

    • Anonymous
      Jason
      Jun. 16, 2010

      Any word?  This is exaclty me as well.

       

       

  • Anonymous
    Alfredo Zotti
    Feb. 19, 2008

    Dear Rose,

     

    I suffer from mild bipolar disorder and have experienced this paranoid thinking. It is not entirely your fault for stigma is often real and many people are prejudiced towards those who suffer from mental disability.

     

    However, I am currently writing about internal and external stigma and if you wish to ask me some questions my email address...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Dear Rose,

     

    I suffer from mild bipolar disorder and have experienced this paranoid thinking. It is not entirely your fault for stigma is often real and many people are prejudiced towards those who suffer from mental disability.

     

    However, I am currently writing about internal and external stigma and if you wish to ask me some questions my email address is this azottie1@bigpond.net.au

     

    Internal stigma can be controlled and it is the major source of paranoid thinking. Once we distance ourselves from internal stigma we can cope much better with life. There is a good person inside of us and what we have to try to do is see the good and the best in people and send out love and good thoughts. This comes with training and it is very difficult but can be achieved.

     

    We all contribute to stigma including us the consumers (sufferers). If we change our perception of what is happening in the world we can improve our life. And this is from direct experience. 

    • Rose
      Feb. 21, 2008
      In response to Alfredo Zotti,  what you wrote was interesting and had a positive note.  That there is a way to curb the outlandish feelings we have about ourselves and others have about us. You could be on to something!  My severe paranoia subsided, but I get over sensitive and some of it returns.  When I think everyone hates me,...
      RHMLucky777
      Read More
      In response to Alfredo Zotti,  what you wrote was interesting and had a positive note.  That there is a way to curb the outlandish feelings we have about ourselves and others have about us. You could be on to something!  My severe paranoia subsided, but I get over sensitive and some of it returns.  When I think everyone hates me, and if they say they don't, then I am suspicious.  I would like to one day be free from that thinking, and return to the normal world.
    • Anonymous
      Alfredo Zotti
      Feb. 21, 2008

      Dear Rose,

       

      rather than wait for any aspect of mental disability to go away as for example your paranoia, it is best that we learn to control paranoia in the first instance just in case because at times mental disability can persevere. What I do I say to myself: it is absolutely not good for me to be paranoid regardless as to whether people hate me or not....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Rose,

       

      rather than wait for any aspect of mental disability to go away as for example your paranoia, it is best that we learn to control paranoia in the first instance just in case because at times mental disability can persevere. What I do I say to myself: it is absolutely not good for me to be paranoid regardless as to whether people hate me or not. I will send  out love and not focus on the hate/not hate voice in my mind. I will not listen to this. This is because, in this way, you have a better life for yourself. Who cares if people hate you or not? We try to love everyone regardless of how they feel. This way we are likely to have a better life. If we send out love we are likely to get love in return. This is a philosophycal way of life such as Buddhism... Alfredo 

    • Anonymous
      bat
      May. 18, 2008

      I think BP's have an over active limbic(fight or flight) system to stimuli which has overcharged anger and fear ares on the amydgala that recognizes even innocent cues as hostile, like the look in someone's eyes who is ambiguous will be interpreted as threatening to a bp.  There is some research on bp's seeing threats in others that others would see as...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      I think BP's have an over active limbic(fight or flight) system to stimuli which has overcharged anger and fear ares on the amydgala that recognizes even innocent cues as hostile, like the look in someone's eyes who is ambiguous will be interpreted as threatening to a bp.  There is some research on bp's seeing threats in others that others would see as neutral.  The over active limbic system can skip cortical filters, and its also possible there is an underactive cortex so it doesn't dampen the rapid firing of the amydala with soothing information on analyzing threat levels in the environment.  There is a high degree of ADHD with bipolar(25-40%) which responds well to amphetamine like agents that help the cortex fire more rapidly to increase alertness in those areas of the brain and it calms people.  The newer antipsychotics have serotonin actions in the cortex and limbic system that inhibit overfiring and in effect do what an underactive cortex does.  They help with anxiety a lot and help prevent it from overwhelming cortical input at the lower doses where their dopamine blocking activity is quite low due to the dose.  So in conclusion, bp's are wired differently regarding inhibitory networks.  It might well be that in the manic phase activating neurons are firing like mad till they deplete rather quickly and then genetically fail to rebuild the neurotransmitters in normal quick fashion, thus giving to short periods of mania followed by much longer periods of depression.  Bp's are a mix of genes interacting and that is why there is such a variation in how the disease manifests itself in an individual.  I think add to this a natural behavioral response called the "paranoid stance" in which an already off balanced neurosystem is more likelly to interpret external cues as threats based on bad memorys in which people in general were toxic to them and didn't understand or try and help them.  What is interesting is how some have paranoia spikes in both manic kindling and depression.  I think this goes back to the limbic system programs overtaking cortical interpretations of the world.  It also would mix up internally generated feelings of mood disequilibrium and new external input coming in and in some cause frank illusions, delusions, and even hallucinations.  Some bp minds are resistance to this extreme manifestation, some are not.  You are right about this kind of paranoia being a type of anxiety, but in its more extreme forms it crosses over into clinical paranoia.  So a combination of medications for mood stabilization, ameilioration of depression and anxiety, and frank low dose serotoninergic neuroleptics and talking therapy including cognitive behavior therapy seem to help the most and finally a nurturing social environment and gainful employment of school to give purpose all seem to work synergistically.  Also important is to choose a careful drug regieme to prevent manic kindling wherre antidepressants are overused.   Some feel that ideal medication is simply to moderate moods and not use antidepressants except in life threatening situations, but this is variable as bp's nervous systems are variable even if they as a whole have similar manifestations of the disease.  In fact its useful to think of bp as a combination of different malfunctioning genes that interact with the person, their personality, their environment,, thier childhood, and coping skills.  By early identification and prevention of major episodes of mania and drepression and all the personality destabilization and social dysfunction they can bring to the table the long term quality of life is greatly improved for the individual and those around them.

  • Shellie
    Jan. 14, 2008

    I have those same thoughts. I worry that people are talking about or laughing at me when in reality there not, but I worry about that. I always thought it was just worrying, but my therapist told me I'm being paranoid. I know paranoia is a symptom of bipolar disorder. I can't stand the thought that I'm paranoid. I wont go into stores becuase I'm...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I have those same thoughts. I worry that people are talking about or laughing at me when in reality there not, but I worry about that. I always thought it was just worrying, but my therapist told me I'm being paranoid. I know paranoia is a symptom of bipolar disorder. I can't stand the thought that I'm paranoid. I wont go into stores becuase I'm afraid that people are talking about me. I don't like public places where there are a lot of people. I don't know what to do about because even with medicaion I still feel this way. It totally ruins my life. Talk with you soon.

     

    Shellie

    • Rose
      Jan. 17, 2008
      No one should have to live in fear. It makes me feel so alone. I like to know that there are other people out there like me.
  • Anonymous
    Judy
    Jan. 09, 2008

    Hi Rose...Off and on, I live with social anxiety.  It can cause feelings of rejection and anger due to the inability to cope in social situations. You may have a touch of this, I'm not sure.

     

    You say you want to develop a social network and have reservations.  May I suggest (here I go again) that you join a support group?  Look in your...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi Rose...Off and on, I live with social anxiety.  It can cause feelings of rejection and anger due to the inability to cope in social situations. You may have a touch of this, I'm not sure.

     

    You say you want to develop a social network and have reservations.  May I suggest (here I go again) that you join a support group?  Look in your local newspaper or call the local CMHC and you may find one.  Good Luck.......Judy 

    • Rose
      Jan. 10, 2008
      Thank you for your concern and offering to help.
  • Eric
    Jan. 09, 2008

    Hi Rose,

     

    What you’re describing can be controlled with medications. I think it’s more of an anxiety issue than a paranoid delusion. Keep in mind that there will be sometimes that others are going to take issue with you and become mad.

     

    Sometimes simply checking it out with this person to see if they do have problems with you can help,...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi Rose,

     

    What you’re describing can be controlled with medications. I think it’s more of an anxiety issue than a paranoid delusion. Keep in mind that there will be sometimes that others are going to take issue with you and become mad.

     

    Sometimes simply checking it out with this person to see if they do have problems with you can help, but more times than not we will only end up discounting what they say anyway. Talk with your pdoc about these negative thoughts and how they are effecting relationships.

     

    Hand in there kiddo…things will get better!

    • billy bob
      Apr. 21, 2010

      I once had an employee who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder just after he was hired. His constant paranoia, inability to handle any kind of criticism, auditory hallucinations, and general whining, childish behavior led him to be constantly in trouble. He finally resigned after a tumultuous seven months on the job in which he spent every day falsely accusing...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      I once had an employee who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder just after he was hired. His constant paranoia, inability to handle any kind of criticism, auditory hallucinations, and general whining, childish behavior led him to be constantly in trouble. He finally resigned after a tumultuous seven months on the job in which he spent every day falsely accusing someone in the office of all kinds of untrue things. Fortunately, he resigned on his own because he was on the road to getting fired. He also showed symptoms of Asperger's Syndrome, which made things even worse.