production
  • (S-O-S) (S-O-S)
    March 03, 2009
    What happens if you do not treat depression or bipolar disorder?
    (S-O-S) (S-O-S)
    March 03, 2009

    I think I may be bipolar. I told my mom but she doesn't think I am. I don't really want to see a doctor or therapist. What if you don't treat it and ignore it?

    READ MORE

FROM OUR EXPERTS

  • John McManamy
    Health Guide
    March 03, 2009
    John McManamy
    Health Guide
    March 03, 2009

    Hi, S-O-S. The DSM - the diagnostic bible - sets this criteria for just about every illness and episode: "sufficiently severe to cause marked impairment in occupational functioning or in usual social activities or relationships with others ..."

     

    In other words the illness is messing up your life so bad that there is no ignoring it. If you do nothing about it, your life is only going to get worse.

     

    If you are getting on well with your life - work or school performance good, getting along with people, feeling at ease with yourself - you probably have nothing to worry about.

     

    Hope this helps -


FROM OUR COMMUNITY

  • Lea
    Lea
    March 08, 2009
    Lea
    Lea
    March 08, 2009

    Hi, just my two cents worth.

     

    Be aware that there are many 'mental health' issues that can exhibit remarkably similar symptomology. Also, people who aren't living with an actual 'condition' can spin out under extreme situations. So, if you think something is going on, best thing to do is to talk to someone who is a professional - it doesn't have to be a fully trained psych nurse or psychiatrist/psychologist though. Even the councillor at the local church has enough basic knowledge to help you start sorting out what's going on in your head.

     

    I know you've said that you don't want to see one, but even if you don't have a condition, seeing a therapist is worth it. An existing condition can have episodes triggered by unresolved environmental factors, or a person who may have the right blue-print can develop a fullblown illness if the right emotional/physical buttons are pushed. Therapy can resolve emotional situations before they trigger a more serious mental/physical reaction.

     

    From personal experience I know how terrifying taking that first step can be. It almost felt like I was somehow weaker for admitting that I needed someone to 'sort my head out'. But now, many years later, I can look back with pride at how I stepped up and took control of my life. I stopped being a victim of my condition, and started truely managing my life when I made that first phone call to my therapist.

     

    He was someone of immense understanding and emotional generosity. And from the work I did with him, I came to understand myself, and the condition I live with. I found my strength, and I learnt that I am worth fighting for. Before therapy, my life was chaos - I didn't understand why I lived the life I did. Now, I see my life through open eyes, and I am now truely living. I think that makes two years of counsilling worth it, don't you? :)

     

    It isn't weak to say "I think there is something wrong in my head". It is the first step to freeing yourself, but with that freedom comes a responsibility to yourself. If you can recognise something isn't OK, if you truely suspect a serious health condition, you owe it to yourself not to ignore that knowledge. Asking someone else to help you isn't easy. And trust me, therapy is hard work, but you're worth every second of effort.

     

    Hope that helps...

     

    Lea

     

     

    READ MORE
  • Is your mom a doctor? I had endometroisis for years & my mother recently admitted she just thought I was being a whiny wimp & she's a RN!

     

    So keep in mind--parents don't know everything! I know you don't really want to go see a doctor but if you think you are--what is the harm? Just go--it's a series of questions, usually a treatment plan and some cognetive therapy which is great.

     

    For me--I took a medication to treat the endometriosis and that triggered my very mild symptoms to become full blown bi-polar. When I say "very" mild--I meant, like you I didn't think I had a problem and actually was just being treated for anxiety. I've since learned that anxiety is a front lying symptom of bi-polar. That's not saying that if you have anxiety--you really have bi-polar but it is true in some people--including me.


    For me--it was a 5 or 6 doctor's visits--I really dreaded them because I didn't know what to expect--but looking back--it was a good decision. I had to talk to a councellor too to make sense in my head of my past behaviour and that it ruined some relationships. Plus I couldn't figure out why I was acting that way. I came from a good home, wasn't abused, no drug history---so why was I acting all weird.

     

    Trust me, you'll be glad to took a step to figure out what IS going on. Chances are it's not bi-polar and it's probably just stress--as stress mimicks bi-polar. I just have to ask you--what if it isn't?  Think about it like cancer--if you think you had cancer & your mom didn't think you had cancer--would you refuse to get treated?

    Bi-polar isn't a mental illness, it is a break down of something working correctly in the brain so the way they treat that is to level out the chemicals inside the brain with medication.

    Cheers!

    READ MORE
You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Content posted by community members does not necessarily reflect the views of Remedy Health Media, which also reserves the right to remove material deemed inappropriate.