• susie susie
    December 30, 2008
    what are some of the best jobs for males that are bipolar?
    susie susie
    December 30, 2008

    Dear Reader,

    I have a dear friend. he is bipolar and is seaching for a new job. THe thing is, he is on meds, so he sleeps a lot. I believe he can wake up about 9am and do alright if he is staying focused on that job. SO, I am just worried that he is not going to be able to find a good job after he finishes his education as well. he is in college right now as well, but is looking for something for now too. 

    THanks for letting me ask a question. how its not too confusing.

     

    Have a great day,

    Susie

     

     

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  • kosimov January 01, 2009
    kosimov
    December 30, 2008

    At the risk of stating the obvious, I believe jobs which are not time-critical would be best.  For example, a production type of job with flexible hours where the person's productivity, rather than hours coming and going, are the basis of pay.  I guess the short answer is "work on commission".  Even then, some employers will want steady hours, so you have to work hard to find the ideal situation.  I was lucky enough to find jobs like this when I was in college; I had a few years experience in electronics repair and I found jobs doing repair work on commission. I worked the hours I could fit around my schedule and my bipolar ups and downs. I didn't know I was bipolar then, and most people, including family (and, I suppose, me also, to some extent), just thought I was unreliable and lazy.  So it is important to find ways to communicate your situation to prospective employers, even if you cannot just say "I am biploar and can't work regular hours".  In my experience, there still are not many people who know what bipolar is, and fewer still who are "OK with it".  I have had my own businesses and I hired biplolar people when the job allowed the flexibility they needed, but I did not know very many other business owners who were as understanding as I was.

     

    Another possibility is to work on jobs over the Internet.  There really are such jobs available, but, there are also a lot of scams and dead-ends advertised on the internet, so you have to be careful.  The rule of thumb is "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is".  For example, an ad which claims "make thousands of dollars a month with no training and only working 10 hours per week" is probably "too good to be true".  The more "down to earth" the offer seems, the better the chance it is valid.  Very few companies hire people to type or stuff envelopes etc., for high wages or commissions.  An internet job or other opportunity will require you to have a high degree of initiative and self-motivation.  I was able to succeed because, once I managed to get up and get going in the day, I could work hard and could work until late at night.  I tried modifying that pattern to fit the college time outline but I did not succeed.  When I accepted my limitations and made sure I took classes which were not so early I would probably not make them most of the time, and jobs which were either flexible or were "swing shift" and even "graveyard", I was able to get through school with an engineering degree.  I finally started my own businesses so I could set my own hours and not have to wrangle with things all the time. 

     

    I hope there may be something useful here.  I just wrote everything I could think of.  It is far easier to give this advice than to follow it, however, since your friend has your help, he has a great advantage over my situation, as I did not have anyone doing what you are doing.  I commend you for it.  I also did not know I was bipolar, as that diagnosis was not very common when I went to college.  Mostly, I was often humiliated, yelled at, and so forth, for being "lazy", "immature", "afraid of work", etc.  I hope your friend does hot have that to deal with, but if so, try to offset those awful experiences with as much encouragement and positive attitude as you can get away with.

     

    The last comment I have may be the most important.  DON'T GIVE UP ON YOUR FRIEND!  If my wife was not absolutely the most understanding, loving, supportive woman ever born, I would have failed many times.  To have someone like you supporting him, your friend has a priceless ally to help him get through school.  I hope he is majoring in something which will offer the flexibility he will need later on, as he deals with bipolar problems.  You just have to keep trying everything you can think of, and, if possible, learn to push failure aside and not let it wear you down, as bipolar illness will invite failures; you have to adopt the attitude that those failures are really opportunities to learn more about what you cannot do so you can focus on other things you may be able to do.

     

    Good luck.  Sorry I can't be of more help.  Your friend is lucky to have your support!

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  • Stephen January 01, 2009
    Stephen
    December 30, 2008

    Being prime minister of Great Britain during World War 2, being a comedian with surreal comedy, or any other job where being high helps.  A writer is a good one.  The best is to have taken out income protection insurance before you got sick, get signed off by the doctor and then live off the payments.  Looking at those who succeeded in spite of their bipolar is a good starting point.  Being married to someone who works and earns enough for them both is another option.  I worked for twenty years after my first manic attack as a psychiatrist.  Having personal experience of mental illness does help.  The real question is is he depressed or high in his basic ground state.  Being high enough to be creative without actually being manic helps a lot.  Getting onto medication that works is very important.  There is nothing worse than being only half treated and being chronically depressed. After fourteen years of low function due to chronic depression I have just been changed to Mirtazepine which has worked better.  It is important to persevere and keep pushing the psychiatrist to keep changing till something totally works.  Then any job that is enjoyed can work.

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  • Shannon January 02, 2009
    Shannon
    December 30, 2008

    I suppose it's different for everyone, as I truly believe each case is so unique.  Personally I find that working multiple jobs works well, as I can be constantly occupying my mind yet with different material, if you will. 

     

    I work as a civil and mechanical engineer for one company, which challenges my reasoning skills and mathematical processing abilities, but then too I work as a male model and actor, which allows me to become someone or something else on a regular basis and no one thinks anything of it.  Lastly, I write, with one book being published at present "Delusions of Grandeur, Emptiness Never Felt So Good" and am working (on request) on my first volumn of poetry.

     

    So for me, it's not about the job, it's about keeping active mentally.

     

    Shannon

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  • Minister of Joy January 01, 2009
    Minister of Joy
    December 30, 2008

    SmileJobs that are part-time where you can start later in the day.  I am pastor of a small church that lets me do my work during any hours. Structure is important.  I come up with sermons written at anytime.  Writing freelance, tv-radio reporters, seminar leaders, support group leaders, and outdoor work can work for you.

     

    I have been a minister for more than 55 years. Even with great abilities and credentials

    beyond belief, high productivity, I have built up churches that can't seem to find a $60,000 per year in income, but can easily call a person who will work for less, even free. Most of my friends with Ph.D., Psy.D., D.Min. degrees who have been ordained make high salaries and serve huge churches.  Some bigger churches ask you to preach, but you have all kinds of associates to do stress work. You can be gone for speaking to other groups and you get a month off, plus time to do continuing education.

     

    Not only have I been able to serve, but focusing on my ministry, which uses my bipolar by sharing my problem with others, having a support group in my church, speaking and writing about it.  Let me share my book, Dancing With Bipolar Bears: Living in Joy Despite Illness (Amazon, iUniverse, etc.)  Also, this past year I wrote Passionate Joy, which has proved helpful.  My web site is Visionquests for Joy (see on Yahoo or Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) national websites under First Christian Church, Weeping Water, Nebraska.

     

    Pastor Jim 

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  • Susan January 01, 2009
    Susan
    December 30, 2008

    Susie:  I'm so glad that you are supporting your friend.  I am bipolar and wasn't diagnosed until 2 yrs ago (now, I know why I couldn't handle the high-stressed, executive assistant jobs anymore).  I also failed at a job I loved (teaching young children about assault prevention using language on their level) because the schedule was "too tight, rushed, and on-call".  I am now a tax preparer for H & R Block and I "love" it !  I AM intelligent and if I can get through the 69 hours of classtime and also atleast 80% on your final to be certified as a preparer, anyone can!!  -- I am back now for my 2nd year.  The best part, is the flexiblility of your schedule -- you work when you want by putting your availability into the office schedule.  Day time between 10:00 and 2:00 or an evening if that works better for your friend (I like to mix mine up because of my 15 yr old son).  Also, check with your local Bureau of Vocational Rehab - I have my appt. this month.  They have a contact for a job that will allow me to work from home which is legitimate.  They also have the contacts to put you in a "normal" job with a job-coach.  Hope these ideas help.  Thanks for being there!  Susan 

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    • overachieversyndrome
      June 11, 2009
      overachieversyndrome
      June 11, 2009

      Dear Susie,

      This was a really good response.  I recently was placed on disability for the past year, based ont he traumatic episode I experienced as the mania took over.  I have been diagnosed for 4 years now.  I have always had high paying corporate jobs, however I couldnt last longer than a year, due to the depression and or mania.  The most scary part of bipolar, is when you finally agree to take your medications and you still have a massive and destructing episode. 

       

      Finally at 30 years old, I have realized and accepted that I need to change my career path.  I am thinking of going into computers however, i just dont know. 

       

      Anyway, your comment was so realistic and helpful.  I really really appreciate it.

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    • littlebitcrazy
      August 20, 2009
      littlebitcrazy
      August 20, 2009

      Doomsday

      I was officially diagnosed Bi-polar today, but have had symptoms and episodes dating back 8 years or more.  I am 31.  I seem to stay pretty level when I stick to a fitness and diet plan...oh and when I am alcohol free.  I am an engineer with an MBA and have operated my own business for some time.  I used to get some awesome highs when I could perform like a superstar, but anymore they are replaced by devastating lows....if I go off my fitness/diet/alcohol regimen.  I don't know what to do for work now.  My business focuses on providing residential renovations.  Most of our projects are performed on occupied homes.  The stress of the homeowner looking over my shoulder makes me very uncomfortable and unstable.  Thankfully, I have never had an episode on the job.  Regardless, I can't handle that kind of stress.

       

      I tried to focus on what I liked from my different careers and I decided that I am happiest when selling.....as long as I am selling something that I really understand. 

       

      Sales engineering is very weak nationwide right now and I am not interested in moving so...

      Maybe property and casualty insurance?

       

      I don't know what to do...any advice? 

       

      Also, I have never had a mania episode that went out of control on its own....the problems always occurred after self medicating with alcohol....that's when the bad stuff happens.

       

       

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  • hinder22 January 01, 2009
    hinder22
    December 30, 2008

    Well, I have bipolar disorder and I know others who do too! The only answer to this is that it would depend on your friends abilities and his likes. I use abilities to mean a broad range of abilities and quite frankly the ability to get out of bed and show up every day is an ability that is included, even to people without bipolar disorder. But for people with bipolar disorder, I would recommend the person really finesse the situation, study exactly what it is that might be your desired employment and what skills that can be offered in that field. Remember that planning ahead is important for a person with bipolar disorder so any curveballs thrown need to be handled with finesse as well. But start with an idea and watch it come true. The job is to maintan a healthy lifestyle. I would not recommend high stress jobs or jobs with major responsibilities such as combat military positions or long term jobs where a manic or depressive bout could disrupt the responsibilities of the job. Try the Coast Guard part-time at first for example and take short-term positions with major responsibilities when your younger, so that way you can learn about yourself without hurting yourself.

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  • Marilyn January 01, 2009
    Marilyn
    December 30, 2008

    I would like an answer there also.  Is being a crossing guard okay.   I hold someone very dear who is bipolar and he is treated terribly by his own family.  Marilyn007@charter.net

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  • littlebitcrazy August 20, 2009
    littlebitcrazy
    December 30, 2008

    Doomsday

    I was officially diagnosed Bi-polar today, but have had symptoms and episodes dating back 8 years or more.  I am 31.  I seem to stay pretty level when I stick to a fitness and diet plan...oh and when I am alcohol free.  I am an engineer with an MBA and have operated my own business for some time.  I used to get some awesome highs when I could perform like a superstar, but anymore they are replaced by devastating lows....if I go off my fitness/diet/alcohol regimen.  I don't know what to do for work now.  My business focuses on providing residential renovations.  Most of our projects are performed on occupied homes.  The stress of the homeowner looking over my shoulder makes me very uncomfortable and unstable.  Thankfully, I have never had an episode on the job.  Regardless, I can't handle that kind of stress.

     

    I tried to focus on what I liked from my different careers and I decided that I am happiest when selling.....as long as I am selling something that I really understand. 

     

    Sales engineering is very weak nationwide right now and I am not interested in moving so...

    Maybe property and casualty insurance?

     

    I don't know what to do...any advice? 

     

    Also, I have never had a mania episode that went out of control on its own....the problems always occurred after self medicating with alcohol....that's when the bad stuff happens.

     

    Sorry this is a duplicate.  I just found the Answer This > >.

     

    Reply

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  • jay
    jay
    October 17, 2013
    jay
    jay
    December 30, 2008

    i have had as many jobs as i am old. i have atlest 2 to 3 month time frames at each. some more some less. I had a company of my own once but found that the bipoler eliminated my contacts every time. i cant find a on line job. i have had over 30 medications and none have worked. i cant keep friends let alon family. if you know of any jobs by name i could look up. even if they are on line. its been hard and only seems to get harder. i dont know how to respond and or check this sight. any advise and or direction would be great.

     

     

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    • Crystal
      October 18, 2013
      Crystal
      October 18, 2013
      I have three suggestions that I know of. Snag a job.com. Monster.com and of course the large newspaper in your area. These websites are really good. Did you give the meds you have tried a fair try? Some can take 4-6 weeks to work or iron out side effects. Have you thought about ECT? Have you thought about going to a Naturapathic Dr? Have you seen a dr for bloodwork, Thyroid, vit d and b, iron. Ask your dr if you can have an Prescription for Deplin. It is a supplement and was recommened by my pscychiatrist for Bipolar. If you are deficient these can really effect our bipolar. Exercise is important. Therapy is important. There is so much you can do. Meds help but we need to do more for ourselves. I suggest these recommendations so they will help you keep and want to keep your job longer and so you will feel better. Don't give up trying to find what works for you. Good luck on your job search. READ MORE
  • Poonam Kahlon April 25, 2011
    Poonam Kahlon
    December 30, 2008

    I would like to get an answer to it aswell. My husband is suffering from Bipolar and finidng it hard to keep up with job and stresses comes along with it.

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