Robin Roberts Faces Another Deadly Battle

PJ Hamel Health Guide July 02, 2012
  • On July 31, 2007, Robin Roberts, co-anchor of ABC’s Good Morning America news show, revealed her breast cancer diagnosis to the public on air. After starting treatment, she returned to the show on August 13. And since that time, she’s seemingly been healthy.   But 3 weeks ago, Rob...

2 Comments
  • Phyllis Johnson
    Health Guide
    Jul. 05, 2012

    I too was stunned watching the announcement, and Robin did indeed do a fantastic job of announcing and educating the general public in a very difficult situation. 

    I remember reading about the risk of leukemia and other serious health problems when I was signing the consent forms for treatment for chemo and radiation.  When I asked, the nurse explained...

    RHMLucky777

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    I too was stunned watching the announcement, and Robin did indeed do a fantastic job of announcing and educating the general public in a very difficult situation. 

    I remember reading about the risk of leukemia and other serious health problems when I was signing the consent forms for treatment for chemo and radiation.  When I asked, the nurse explained that IF I were one of the tiny percentage who did get those problems, it would be years in the future.  Without those treatments, my future was measured in months, not years, so signing the forms and taking the treatments was an easy choice.  Robin's announcement is another reminder to all cancer survivors of how important it is to let our doctors know about any unusual symptoms we have even years after we have finished treatment.

    • PJ Hamel
      Health Guide
      Jul. 05, 2012

      So many non-survivors think that once you're done with treatment, you're "cured" and cancer is gone. Truthfully, as so many of us learn - the cancer experience is permanent. Thankfully not many have to deal with a chemo-induced secondary cancer, but neuropathy, lymphedema, lack of estrogen, and other physical challenges as a result of cancer (and its treatment)...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      So many non-survivors think that once you're done with treatment, you're "cured" and cancer is gone. Truthfully, as so many of us learn - the cancer experience is permanent. Thankfully not many have to deal with a chemo-induced secondary cancer, but neuropathy, lymphedema, lack of estrogen, and other physical challenges as a result of cancer (and its treatment) are common, irritating, painful, and sometimes life-altering... But we know that, huh? Undecided Thanks, Phyllis - PJH