contributing factors

Reproductive Choices and Breast Cancer Risk: A HealthCentral Explainer

SSuchy Editor March 11, 2013
  • (flickr, starbooze) There’s been a small, steady and troubling increase in breast cancer rates among a specific demographic of women for the last 37 years. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association uncovered, to the surprise of many breast cancer experts, that the nu...

2 Comments
  • PJ Hamel
    Health Guide
    Mar. 08, 2013

    Thanks for posting this, Sara. You're so right; awareness is the bottom line. If a woman is on the fence about when to have her first child, this information may tip the balance; at minimum, it should be weighed as part of her decision. And women using hormonal birth control need to be aware of the real and increased risk of breast cancer "The Pill" carries,...

    RHMLucky777

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    Thanks for posting this, Sara. You're so right; awareness is the bottom line. If a woman is on the fence about when to have her first child, this information may tip the balance; at minimum, it should be weighed as part of her decision. And women using hormonal birth control need to be aware of the real and increased risk of breast cancer "The Pill" carries, along with protection from pregnancy. Knowledge is power – PJH

  • Phyllis Johnson
    Health Guide
    Mar. 17, 2013

    Thank you, Sara, for such a comprehensive look at how hormone exposure from a variety of factors increases the risk for breast cancer.  There are some risk factors that are fully under our control--smoking, drinking, exercise.  Then there are the ones we have no control over such as family history.  To me, delayed childbirth falls somewhere in...

    RHMLucky777

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    Thank you, Sara, for such a comprehensive look at how hormone exposure from a variety of factors increases the risk for breast cancer.  There are some risk factors that are fully under our control--smoking, drinking, exercise.  Then there are the ones we have no control over such as family history.  To me, delayed childbirth falls somewhere in the middle.  Single or infertile women can't reduce their breast cancer risk with pregnancy, and no one should have a baby just to reduce her breast cancer risk.  Because having a baby is a life-long commitment to that child, it is vital that the parents be emotionally ready for that responsibility.  So it is important that readers notice you said this increase in breast cancer among young women is small and not fully understood so that they don't worry that they are not doing everything they can to prevent breast cancer if they can't have a baby.  

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