Try a Trial? Maybe

Phyllis Johnson Health Guide January 19, 2013
  • How does your doctor know how much radiation to use in your CT scan?  For that matter, how does your doctor know how well any medicine or procedure works?  The answer is someone has worked it out in a clinical trial.   When I went for my most recent CT scan, the doctor asked if I wou...

2 Comments
  • PJ Hamel
    Health Guide
    Jan. 19, 2013

    Thanks, Phyllis, for this clear summary of what's involved in most clinical trials. Oftentimes the trial simply isn't that "exciting," thankfully; you won't notice any difference beyond what you noticed, filling out some extra forms. But every time we choose to enter a trial, it helps advance everyone's cause: better drugs, better protocols, better treatment....

    RHMLucky777

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    Thanks, Phyllis, for this clear summary of what's involved in most clinical trials. Oftentimes the trial simply isn't that "exciting," thankfully; you won't notice any difference beyond what you noticed, filling out some extra forms. But every time we choose to enter a trial, it helps advance everyone's cause: better drugs, better protocols, better treatment. It's a way of giving back AND paying forward – helping the medical community that, for many of us, has been a true life-saver. PJH

    • Phyllis Johnson
      Health Guide
      Jan. 20, 2013

      I agree, PJ.  I have had the opportunity to participate in several studies.  For a few minutes of my time (and sometimes a vial of blood), I have been able to add to medical knowledge.