• RHD RHD
    October 07, 2009
    I have G3 T2 no mo metaplastic carcinoma ER PR HER2 neg what does al this mean and will i survive
    RHD RHD
    October 07, 2009

    I had a mastectomy and all lymph nodes removed now having chemo FEC (aptly named) as a belts and braces follow up as it was grade 3

    READ MORE

FROM OUR EXPERTS

  • PJ Hamel
    Health Guide
    October 07, 2009
    PJ Hamel
    Health Guide
    October 07, 2009

    Hi - Please read our Guide to Understanding your Pathology Report; it'll really help you interpret this "medicalese." T2 is a tumor between 2 and 5cm; NO and MO mean no nodes are involved, and it hasn't spread outside the breast. G3 is grade 3. ER/PR negative means you won't be taking long-term hormone therapy, as your cancer isn't responsive to hormones. HER2 negative means your cancer is a less aggressive sort. This is all actually pretty good; and I'd assume your 5-year survival rate would fall around the 98% area... I had FEC, too - good luck. I didn't find it too bad... Stay in touch here, we can help. PJH

    • RHD
      RHD
      October 08, 2009
      RHD
      RHD
      October 08, 2009

      thank you so much I now feel I have hope for a future

      READ MORE
    • PJ Hamel
      October 08, 2009
      PJ Hamel
      Health Guide
      October 08, 2009

      Glad we could help - stay in touch. PJH

      READ MORE
    • zeenat bindra
      July 26, 2011
      zeenat bindra
      July 26, 2011

      hi, my mother is 68 years old and she has been operated for  carcinoma left breast. stage T1N0M0. the surgeon has performed breast conserving surgery. i wanted to know how dangerous the same is and should she undergo chemotheraphy as we have been told it would not make only 10% differnce and will have side effects which would be life stye changes.

      READ MORE
    • PJ Hamel
      July 26, 2011
      PJ Hamel
      Health Guide
      July 26, 2011

      Hi - From the information you've given us, it sounds like your mom had  a small cancer that was caught early. With breast conservation surgery, I asume she'll have radiation. That should be sufficient to put her back on the road to good health.

       

      Since chemo might improve her relative survival rate by just 10%, this means, with a survival rate that's probably already about 90%, it would make less than a 1% difference. And since it can indeed alter a woman's life – leaving side effects that last forever – I'd avoid it, if I were her. For more information, please read our post on deciding whether to have chemo. Best of luck to both of you as she continues her treatment- PJH

      READ MORE

FROM OUR COMMUNITY

  • sg
    sg
    April 08, 2010
    sg
    sg
    October 07, 2009

    Hi I am in the same boat as you with T2 G3 NO ER/PR/HER 2 neg breast cancer. I had a lumpectomy and nodes and am now half way through FEC. I am having radiotherapy to follow.

    All very scary as I am 40 and have a now 5 month old baby plus an older daughter.

    Nice to read there is hope for the future!

    READ MORE
    • PJ Hamel
      April 08, 2010
      PJ Hamel
      Health Guide
      April 08, 2010

      ALWAYS hope, SG. I hope you're doing OK on the FEC; I did that same treatment, and it worked very well for me, as I'm now 9 years out. I think you'll find the radiation is much "easier" than the chemo. Best of luck, and stay in touch here, OK? We can help. PJH

      READ MORE
    • sg
      sg
      April 13, 2010
      sg
      sg
      April 13, 2010

      Have had a bad day today as have found out that a friend who has been dealing with her breast cancer for more than 5 yrs has been told she has a maximum of 3 months left! As I am halfway through my FECtreatment it has suddenly brought it all home to me. Have been very tearful - for her, for me, for my family!

      READ MORE
    • PJ Hamel
      April 13, 2010
      PJ Hamel
      Health Guide
      April 13, 2010

      Oh, I'm so sorry.... for everyone. Cancer is just awful, and all we can do is make our way through it the best we can. Some of us don't make it. But take heart - the vast majority of us DO survive cancer, and go on to live long lives. Hold onto that hope - PJH

      READ MORE
You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Content posted by community members does not necessarily reflect the views of Remedy Health Media, which also reserves the right to remove material deemed inappropriate.