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Fentanyl TD Uses and How to Use


IMPORTANT NOTE: The following information is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

Generic Name: FENTANYL - TRANSDERMAL
Pronounced: (FEN-tuh-nill)

Fentanyl TD Uses

This medication is used to help relieve moderate to severe ongoing pain (such as due to cancer). Fentanyl belongs to a class of drugs known as narcotic (opiate) analgesics. It works in the brain to change how your body feels and responds to pain.

How To Use Fentanyl TD

Read the Medication Guide and, if available, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. Learn how to properly use, store, and discard the patches. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Before you start using this medication, ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should stop or change the dose of your other narcotic medication(s). It may take up to 24 hours before you have pain relief from fentanyl patches. For added pain relief, your doctor may direct you to also take quick-acting narcotic or non-narcotic pain medications (such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen). Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about using fentanyl safely with other drugs.

Apply this medication to the skin as directed by your doctor. Do not apply on burns, cuts, irritated skin, or skin that has been exposed to radiation (x-ray treatment). Select a dry, non-hairy area on a flat part of your body, such as the chest, sides, back, or upper arms. In young children or in people unable to think clearly (such as due to dementia), apply the patch on the upper back to lessen the chance it might be removed or placed in the mouth. If there is hair on the skin, use scissors to clip the hair as close as possible to the skin. Do not shave hair since this might cause skin irritation. If needed, use water to clean the area. Do not use soap, oils, lotions, or alcohol on the application site. Dry the skin well before applying the patch.

The patch is usually changed every 72 hours. To avoid irritation, apply to a different area each time. Be sure to remove the old patch before applying a new patch. The used patch should be folded in half with the sticky sides together and properly discarded.

Do not use the patch if it appears to be broken, cut, or damaged. Remove from the sealed pouch, peel off the protective liner, and apply immediately to the skin. Press firmly in place with the palm of the hand for 30 seconds, making sure the contact is complete (especially around the edges). If your prescribed dose is for more than one patch, make sure the edges of the patches do not touch or overlap. After applying the patch, wash your hands with water only.

If you have problems with the patch not sticking at the application site, you may tape the edges in place with first aid tape. If this problem persists, ask your doctor for advice. If the patch falls off before 72 hours, a new patch may be applied to a different skin site. Be sure to let your doctor know if this happens.



CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.
Information last revised November 2011 Copyright(c) 2011 First DataBank, Inc.