Friday, October 24, 2014

Treatment for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease

Many COPD drugs are inhaled using metered dose inhalers, dry powder inhalers, or nebulizers.

Metered-Dose Inhaler. The standard device for delivering COPD medication is the metered-dose inhaler (MDI). This device allows precise doses to be delivered directly to the lungs. A holding chamber, or spacer, improves delivery by giving the patient more time to inhale the medication.

Breath-Activated Dry Powder Inhalers. Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) deliver a powdered form of the drug directly into the lungs. DPIs are as effective as MDIs and are easier to manage. Humidity or extreme temperatures can affect DPI performance, so these devices should not be stored in humid places (such as bathroom cabinets) or locations with high temperatures (such as glove compartments during summer months).

Other Handheld Inhalers. Respimat delivers a fine-mist spray that is created by forcing the liquid medication through nozzles. It does not use any propellant.

Nebulizers. A nebulizer is a device that administers the drug in a fine spray that the patient breathes in. Nebulizers are often used in hospitals or when the patient cannot use an inhaler.

Inhaler medication administration
This metered-dose inhaler is a quick way of administering medicine directly into the bronchial passageways to promote clearer breathing.

Medicines That Loosen Lung Secretions

Patients with persistent coughing and phlegm often use medications that loosen secretions and help move them out of the lungs.

Expectorants. Expectorants, such as guaifenesin (found in common cough remedies), stimulate the flow of fluid in the airways and help move secretions using the motion of cilia (the hair-like structures in the lung) and coughing. Expectorants have not been shown to benefit patients with COPD.

Mucolytics. Mucolytics contain ingredients that make phlegm more watery and easier to cough up. One of these ingredients, acetylcysteine, also acts as an antioxidant, which could provide additional benefit to people with COPD. The most effective mucolytic is stopping smoking. Anticholinergics appear to decrease the production of mucus. Beta2-agonists and theophylline improve mucus clearance.

Other Medications

Statins. The same drugs used to lower cholesterol may also help protect the lungs of COPD patients, in part due to their anti-inflammatory effects. However, more research is needed to prove these benefits, and to determine the optimal statin dose for COPD patients.

Antibiotics


Review Date: 04/10/2010
Reviewed By: Harvey Simon, MD, Editor-in-Chief, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org)