10/22/2014
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  • NEWS

    Researchers at the University of Michigan and Harvard Medical School have been able to restore hearing in noise-deafened mice by increasing the production of one key protein. Read more.


  • NEWS

    Danish scientists using brain scans say they've been able to determine why some people are more prone to getting the blues during the winter.  It has to do with serotonin levels in their brains. Read more.


  • NEWS

    The combination of marriage troubles and a history of depression can increase the risk of obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research at Ohio State University. Read more.


  • INFOGRAPHIC OF THE WEEK

    Here’s advice to help you conquer cravings.

  • QUOTE OF
    THE DAY

    The best advice is found on the pillow.

    —Danish proverb


  • NEWS

    According to a new study, Ebola airport screenings of passengers leaving West Africa have prevented three cases of the virus from leaving the region per month. That suggests that the screenings have been an effective way to keep the disease from spreading beyond Africa. Read more


  • NEWS

    A paralyzed man is now able to walk with the help of a frame after surgeons in Poland transplanted cells from his nose into his spine to help regrow nerve fibers there. Read more

  • SLICE OF HISTORY

    A British surgeon named Joseph Carpue performs the first nose reconstruction in Europe and launches the practice of plastic surgery in western medicine. Carpue, a surgeon at Duke of York’s Hospital in Chelsea, England, had read an article in a magazine about doctors in India reshaping the mutilated noses of soldiers and went there to learn more about the process. Upon his return to England, he attempts a rhinoplasty on a soldier whose nose had been eaten away by the effects of mercury treatment, used at the time to treat some diseases. Taking skin from the patient’s forehead, the surgeon fashioned it into a nose. Get the full story.

Previous DOSE