12/09/2013
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  • NEWS

    Sleep isn’t the only thing affected by circadian rhythms. Researchers from the University of Adelaide in Australia found that circadian rhythms exist in nerves in the stomach, which may help regulate eating habits according to different times of the day. Read more


  • NEWS

    If your child uses a high chair or a booster seat, you may need to take extra precautions to avoid injuries. Researchers say injuries to children in the chairs has been on the rise nationwide. Read more


  • NEWS

    Feeling stressed out may affect not only you, but also your children—and their weight. New research published in the journal Pediatric Obesity found a correlation between parental stress and weight gain among children, which may lead to obesity and other health issues later on. Read more


  • INFOGRAPHIC OF THE WEEK

    Emotional eating can range from eating despite a lack of hunger to an all-out binge where we lose control and use food as an escape. Here's how to regain control.

  • QUOTE OF
    THE DAY

    Each night, when I go to sleep, I die. And the next morning, when I wake up, I am reborn.

    —Mahatma Gandhi


  • NEWS

    Smart phones are nothing new, but Microsoft is developing a new device that you may surprise you. The company's researchers say that women may one day wear a “smart bra” that tracks emotions, with the goal of discouraging the wearer from engaging in emotional eating. Read more


  • NEWS

    New research from the Harvard School of Public Health shows that eating healthier may come at a price. Researchers worked out price differences of various foods—from healthy vegetables and grains to processed meats and unhealthy oils—and found the healthy food groups to cost about $550 more per year per person. Read more

  • SLICE OF HISTORY

    A Hartford, Connecticut dentist named Horace Wells inhales nitrous oxide—commonly known as laughing gas—and then has his assistant pull a wisdom tooth from his mouth.  Although the assistant would later write that the tooth "required great force to extract," Wells feels no pain. After the gas wears off, he declares the beginning of "a new era in tooth-pulling." Wells was right, but his experiment didn't change just dentistry; it introduced the concept of giving anesthesia to patients before surgery. Sadly, Wells didn't see his discovery become common medical practice.  He became addicted to chloroform and, in 1848, committed suicide while in a New York City jail. Read more

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