Depression During Christmas and Holidays: How to Cope

Deborah Gray Health Guide
  • Right before I got diagnosed with depression, I suffered through the most horrible Christmas ever. On the surface, everything was fine. I spent Christmas Day with my family as usual and a couple of days later my best friend got married in a lovely ceremony and reception. But the moment I was out of sight on my way home from my parents' house, I burst out crying and cried for hours. And I was only able to endure an hour of the wedding reception before escaping. Thankfully, by the next holiday season my depression was controlled by antidepressants and I truly enjoyed it.


    The holidays put a lot of demands on everyone, but are exponentially more difficult for someone with depression. Getting through the usual day to day can be painful, and the holidays add a lot of things to the mix like stress, emotional upheaval and unhealthy (although delicious) food and drink. However, there are a few steps you can take to boost your physical and mental health. Even if the steps don't boost your mood, they should help to immunize you against some aspects of the holidays that can make your depression worse.

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    • Prioritize sleep at the top of your list. Sleep is very important when you're under stress, and sleep deprivation is not good for people with clinical depression.
    • Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. Alcohol is a depressant, pure and simple. It might stave off the blues for an hour or so, but will not do you any favors. Its siren song promising temporary oblivion is very tempting, but it's really the last thing you need.
    • I know this comes as a shocker, but foods high in fat and sugar and not much else are not good for you, and that's mentally as well as physically. And this is coming from someone who won't eat vegetables unless they have butter or sauce on them. For one thing, if you're eating a lot of sugar and fat you're not eating the good nutrition that can help stave off depression. Second, how irritable do you feel when that sugar high wears off? Not a good look for someone who is clinically depressed to begin with. I know that those holiday foods are yummy and everywhere you turn, but limiting yourself to just sampling those less than healthful foods is a good idea. Have a healthy snack before holiday parties so that you don't go overboard on appetizers and dessert. And remember, alcohol has a lot of sugar in it.
    • Make some time for yourself. Spending just 15 minutes alone, can be quite rejuvenating, particularly in households where there's a lot of activity or out-of-town company. Make a cup of tea, go for a walk or find a quiet place to enjoy for a bit. The sounds of silence will be music to your ears.
    • Getting together with family over the holidays can raise a lot of issues. If you're in therapy, you might want to discuss with your therapist how you should defuse some potential problems. Be honest with family and friends about how you feel. Don't be afraid of bringing everyone down with your mood; your family and friends may be worried about you, and you will all feel better if there's an open line of communication.
Published On: December 02, 2009