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Thursday, May 27, 2010 Jeebie Mill, Community Member, asks

Q: Stopping Celexa?

I have been taking Celexa 20 mg for 5 years.  My problem was learning to deal with my physical limitatiions having been an extremely active athletic type person prior to my injuries.  I  would go on crying jags out of sheer frustration and tended to isolate myself from society and family before I started taking Celexa.  It has  helped and now I feel like I am "over the hump" so to speak.  I am taking another medication for hypertension along with the celexa.  I would like to cut down on my medications unless it is necessary to good health.  Can I just stop taking Celexa and see how I feel or do I need to taper off?  JM

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Answers (2)
///, Community Member
5/27/10 12:32pm

Hello Jeebie

Please read the following

Patient Education - English

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  • Generic Name: citalopram (oral)
  • Pronounced: si TAL o pram
  • Brand Name: Celexa

What is the most important information I should know about citalopram?

 

Do not take citalopram together with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take citalopram. After you stop taking citalopram, you must wait at least 14 days before you start taking an MAOI.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Some antidepressants may cause serious or life-threatening lung problems in newborn babies whose mothers take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy. If you are planning a pregnancy, or if you become pregnant while taking citalopram, do not stop taking the medication without first talking to your doctor.

What is citalopram?

Citalopram is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Citalopram affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause depression.

Citalopram is used to treat depression.

Citalopram may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking citalopram?

 

Do not use citalopram if you are using an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), or selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam). Serious and sometimes fatal reactions can occur when these medicines are taken with citalopram. You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAO inhibitor before you can take citalopram. After you stop taking citalopram, you must wait at least 14 days before you start taking an MAOI.

Before taking citalopram, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • liver or kidney disease;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • bipolar disorder (manic depression); or
  • a history of drug abuse or suicidal thoughts.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take citalopram.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. SSRI antidepressants may cause serious or life-threatening lung problems in newborn babies whose mothers take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy. If you are planning a pregnancy, or if you become pregnant while taking citalopram, do not stop taking the medication without first talking to your doctor.

Citalopram can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give citalopram to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor.

How should I take citalopram?

 

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from the medication.

Try to take the medicine at the same time each day. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

To be sure you get the correct dose of liquid citalopram, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

It may take 4 weeks or longer before you start feeling better. Do not stop using citalopram without first talking to your doctor. You may have unpleasant side effects if you stop taking this medication suddenly.

Store citalopram at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and take the next one as directed. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

 

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have taken too much of this medication. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, tremor, sweating, rapid heartbeat, confusion, dizziness, seizures, and coma.

What should I avoid while taking citalopram?

Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of citalopram.

Citalopram can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by citalopram.

What are the possible side effects of citalopram?

 

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: skin rash or hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, overactive reflexes;
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, feeling unsteady, loss of coordination; or
  • headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, weakness, confusion, hallucinations, fainting, seizure, shallow breathing or breathing that stops.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • drowsiness;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • mild nausea, gas, upset stomach;
  • weight changes;
  • urinating more than usual;
  • decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm;
  • dry or watery mouth, yawning; or
  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect citalopram?

Talk to your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes aspirin and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), indomethacin, piroxicam (Feldene), nabumetone (Relafen), etodolac (Lodine), and others. Taking any of these drugs with citalopram may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Before taking citalopram, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines:

  • carbamazepine (Tegretol);
  • cimetidine (Tagamet);
  • lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith);
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);
  • any other antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft); or
  • almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with citalopram. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

 

Source: epocrates.com

 

Be Well

-Michel-

Reply
incslave, Community Member
5/27/10 3:45pm

Jeebie - I went off Lexapro cold turkey once and it was not a good idea. I had lots of side effects and my depression worsened considerably. Several months later I tapered off without any problems. It took me about two weeks to taper off.

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By Jeebie Mill, Community Member— Last Modified: 12/26/10, First Published: 05/27/10