Supplements

Protein Powder for Diabetes

David Mendosa Health Guide March 30, 2012
  • “Is taking whey protein powder good or bad for people with type 2 diabetes?”This was a correspondent’s recent question. I told him that this is such a good question that I would answer him here.Many people supplement their protein intake with a daily scoop or two of protein powder...

12 Comments
  • khrios
    Sep. 21, 2012

    Why(how) would a carb-free, high quality, whey protein powder cause a quick BG increase?  

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Sep. 23, 2012

      The question is not about the speed of the increase in blood glucose, but rather about the amount. I discuss it and link sources in the main article for these comments. You can find that at:

       

      http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/17/151659/protein-diabetes

       

      David

  • khrios
    Sep. 21, 2012

    Can you explain why would a carb-free, whey protein powder would cause a quick increase in BG?  

  • Anonymous
    marianne scott
    Apr. 03, 2012
    Hi David, you talk about whey protein POWDER. What about whey that appears on top of yogurt? I always make my own yogurt, about 3 liters at the time and drink the whey for the protein and taste? What is your view of liquid, natural whey/ Marianne Scott, a type 2
    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Apr. 03, 2012

      Dear Marianne,

       

      Good question that I hadn't previously considered. But I think you are right that the natural whey in the yogurt you make can't be a problem.

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    marianne scott
    Apr. 03, 2012
    Hi David, you talk about whey protein POWDER. What about whey that appears on top of yogurt? I always make my own yogurt, about 3 liters at the time and drink the whey for the protein and taste? What is your view of liquid, natural whey/ Marianne Scott, a type 2
  • Anonymous
    marianne scott
    Apr. 03, 2012
    Hi David, you talk about whey protein POWDER. What about whey that appears on top of yogurt? I always make my own yogurt, about 3 liters at the time and drink the whey for the protein and taste? What is your view of liquid, natural whey/ Marianne Scott, a type 2
  • Ian Heavy
    Apr. 02, 2012

    I'm struggling here to understand, why we would worry about having more protein in our diet than 56 grms, and hope you can help me. I'm not considering protein supplematation, but normal dietary sources.

     

    If, as I am, someone with diabetes, was attempting to lose wieght, was underatking fairly arduous exercise regularly, would protein not be a good choice...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I'm struggling here to understand, why we would worry about having more protein in our diet than 56 grms, and hope you can help me. I'm not considering protein supplematation, but normal dietary sources.

     

    If, as I am, someone with diabetes, was attempting to lose wieght, was underatking fairly arduous exercise regularly, would protein not be a good choice for a large proportion of your calorie intake because:

     

    1. it is necessary to repair and build muscle.

     

    2. if as Dr. Bernstein says it is inefficiently converted to glucose, then we can have more protein calories than carbohydrate calories for the same effect on our blood sugar.

     

    3. if we have enough fat in our diet for our body's maintenance of nerves etc, why would that be a superior choice for our calorie need than protein, given 2 above?

     

    I hope this makes sense to you.

     

    Thanking-you in anticipation

     

    Ian

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Apr. 02, 2012

      Dear Ian,

       

      You make some excellent points, especially the first two. But regarding your third point you mention fat for maintenance of nerves. Actually, we must have fat or carbohydrates rather more for energy. And when we follow a very low-carb diet, we get almost all of our energy from that fat.

       

      While we need protein to repair and build muscles,...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Ian,

       

      You make some excellent points, especially the first two. But regarding your third point you mention fat for maintenance of nerves. Actually, we must have fat or carbohydrates rather more for energy. And when we follow a very low-carb diet, we get almost all of our energy from that fat.

       

      While we need protein to repair and build muscles, above the amounts the Institute of Medicine stated (e.g. 56g/d for men), more isn't better. It is in fact not good if we are trying to control our blood glucose level. I am working as hard as I can to do that and also to control my weight. So I need to limit my protein as well as my carbohydrates. Of course, I have to limit my fat intake too!

       

      David

  • JG
    JG
    Apr. 01, 2012

    I assume most people need 2500-3000 calories a day.

    If carbs are limited and protein is limited, does this not mean we

    have to eat a lot of fat to make up the difference?

    JG

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Apr. 01, 2012

      Dear Joe,

       

      You are absolutely right. Fat is what gives us the energy we need.

       

  • jerseyhiker
    Mar. 31, 2012

    Do all of you who eat low-carb diets feel you eat too much protein.  Dr. Eades, book author, does not believe 100 grams of protein per day is too much, especially if one is active.  When one is hungry between meals we don't have a lot of choose from: a piece of chicken, couple of cubes of cheese, peanut butter; we stay away from raw carrots, though...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Do all of you who eat low-carb diets feel you eat too much protein.  Dr. Eades, book author, does not believe 100 grams of protein per day is too much, especially if one is active.  When one is hungry between meals we don't have a lot of choose from: a piece of chicken, couple of cubes of cheese, peanut butter; we stay away from raw carrots, though I do eat a lot of cucumber!