The Nova Max Plus Meter

David Mendosa Health Guide April 09, 2012
  • Nobody questions our need for blood glucose meters to be accurate. Yet only a few of the meter manufacturers seem to be doing anything about it. People with diabetes rely on our meters to see what the food we eat, the exercise we get, and the medication we take does to our blood glucose levels. Only...

10 Comments
  • georgepds
    May. 14, 2012

    So I bought this meter to try it out, alnog with 50 test strips

     

    Some minor quirks

     

    1) they dont' send you 2 bottles of 25, but a big bottle of 50 which does not fit in the case

     

    2) the mteer did not come with any test strips, nor did it come with a test solution

     

    3) the manual says the meter is good for 20 measurements per battery....

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    So I bought this meter to try it out, alnog with 50 test strips

     

    Some minor quirks

     

    1) they dont' send you 2 bottles of 25, but a big bottle of 50 which does not fit in the case

     

    2) the mteer did not come with any test strips, nor did it come with a test solution

     

    3) the manual says the meter is good for 20 measurements per battery. For comparison, I use my one touch ultrea fro a year before changing batteries

     

     

     

     

    • Gretchen Becker
      Health Guide
      Jun. 19, 2012

      The manual I have says the battery lasts for approx 1000 tests.

  • Stan Slonkosky
    Apr. 10, 2012

    A Nova representative was giving away Nova Max Plus meters at the Diabetes Expo (which was free to attend) put on by the American Diabetes Association on St. Patrick's Day at the Los Angeles Convention Center. I don't know if similar expos are being held at other locations around the country, but it would probably be worth peoples' time to attend even though...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    A Nova representative was giving away Nova Max Plus meters at the Diabetes Expo (which was free to attend) put on by the American Diabetes Association on St. Patrick's Day at the Los Angeles Convention Center. I don't know if similar expos are being held at other locations around the country, but it would probably be worth peoples' time to attend even though there was some people promoting nonsense. (One booth was promoting a fruit drink, "All Natural Cobá Aguas Frescas," with the slogan "Real Agua Real Sabor" that had 36g of sugar per 16 ounce bottle. I was assured by the two young women in the group that it was okay for diabetics to drink because it was "all natural." It was sweetened with agave juice, which I understand can be up to 90% fructose, so maybe it wouldn't raise blood sugar as quickly as if it had more glucose in it. Dr. Robert Lustig of UCSF again called fructose a "metabolic poison" when he was on "60 MInutes" recently.

    It came with 10 strips for blood glucose testing and 2 strips for urine ketone testing. A bottle of control solution is included in the box.

     

    There is a discount card included so that if you have insurance that will cover part of the cost and if you have a prescription for these strips, your maximum co-pay for 50 strips would be $15. If you don't have any insurance, the discount card is not valid, but he pointed out that you could buy them from American Diabetes Wholesale for $23.

     

    (Roche recently changed their policy in that it can also be used if you don't have insurance, but only for up to $20 off. For example, 50 Accu-Chek Aviva strips cost $60 at Costco, so with the discount card you'd pay $40 if you don't have any insurance. Costco has a prescription discount plan, but it is not insurance. It did reduce my cost of metformin considerably in that I paid about $9 for 240 500 mg ER tablets when I had paid about $6 for only 60 tablets a few weeks earlier before I knew about and signed up for the program.)

     

    I was using the Accu-Chek Aviva because that was the one Dr. Bernstein had recommended. He said that he found that the strips from another meter he used to recommend started giving inconsistent results after the manfacturing was shifted to outside the US and that most of them gave readings that were too low compared to lab results. The Aviva strips are manufactured in Indiana and Puerto Rico. I don't know if Dr. Bernstein has tried the Nova Max Plus. I don't know if there are any other differences, but the name suggests it is an upgrade of the Nova Max, which only tests blood glucose.

     

    The Nova representative said the strips were made in the USA and that manufacturing process was consisent enough that coding was not required. He did take names and addresses of all who were given meters and I thought he was going to send a complimentary box of blood glucose strips, but so far I haven't received any.

     

    I hadn't realized this was a new meter until I saw this posting, but having read it and the supporting information, I will start using this meter on a regular basis instead of my Aviva. It seems like you are getting better accuracy and a lower price.

     

    I would think that most of us eating low carb would not need to test ketones very often, if at all, but it's nice to know that capability is there if you need it.

     

    I asked the Nova rep if there was a way to connect the meter to a computer to transfer data. He said that there was a USB cable that plugs into the same place that the strips plug into. I don't see that cable on the web side, so perhaps it isn't yet available. Most cell phones have standardized on micro-USB (although a few use mini-USB). I wish that meter manufacturers would do the same so you didn't need to have yet another cable to keep track of (and possibly lose).

    • BobM Uk
      Apr. 11, 2012

      Oh Wow...We are Truly Blessed Here in the UK..

       

      ALL my Meds (Victoza,Pioglitazone,Metformin,Atorvatatin,Omeprazole) My Accuchek Aviva, All test strips,All needles & needle safe,Eye Checks,visitits to the doctor or diabetic nurse, specialist patient seminars.

       

      In fact anything to do with my Diabetes is FREE.

    • ANANYMOUS
      Apr. 14, 2012

      Just to correct you on the KETONE strips....They are for blood sample not urine. You check it just as if you check your blood sugar, the difference you will notice on your Nova Max Plus meter screen the letters KET show up when you insert the KETONE stips into the meter, it will count down from 10 to 1 and you will get a reading between LO-0.6 (Normal, no action...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Just to correct you on the KETONE strips....They are for blood sample not urine. You check it just as if you check your blood sugar, the difference you will notice on your Nova Max Plus meter screen the letters KET show up when you insert the KETONE stips into the meter, it will count down from 10 to 1 and you will get a reading between LO-0.6 (Normal, no action required) 0.6-1.5 (may indicate developement of medical concern, consult Health Care Provider) 1.5-HI (indicates developing of DKA, CONSULT HEALTH CARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY).You will also be able to check your owner's manual on KETONE on pages 31-34.

  • BoulderDiabetic
    Apr. 10, 2012

    David, 

     

    what are the other most accurate meters tested besides this one? 

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Apr. 11, 2012

      Dear Barry,

       

      The links in my article name the other meters tested. Or are you asking which meters have some basis of being called accurate? If the later, meters by AgaMatrix called their WaveSense meters, have a good recommendation. Among the mainstream meters the Accu-Chek Aviva rates high with some people.

    • Anonymous
      Michael K
      May. 20, 2012

      The Accu Check Aviva just introduced a new line of test strips 4 months ago called  Aviva plus. The company claims that their new test strips are 23% more accurate than their prior strips. Dr. Bernstein's office has been recommending the Aviva as their meter of choice for some time now. Up until now I have disagreed with their  recommendation and...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      The Accu Check Aviva just introduced a new line of test strips 4 months ago called  Aviva plus. The company claims that their new test strips are 23% more accurate than their prior strips. Dr. Bernstein's office has been recommending the Aviva as their meter of choice for some time now. Up until now I have disagreed with their  recommendation and have found the Accu Check Compact Plus to be far more consistent. When we talk about meter readings there are really two components  and it is important to make the distinction between the two. Accuracy is how close a meter reads to a lab test and consistency is how close a meter reads to itself on consecutive tests. Consistency is far more important to me than accuracy because you can calculate how far a meters calibration is off by simply taking it with you to your lab test and noting the difference. When I test the Accu Check Compact five times in a row squeezing five successive drops of blood from the same finger prick site I get a total variance of only 5 to 6 points. When I do the same test with the Aviva ( I have done these tests many times on several meters) I get a variance of 17 points! For me this variance it too great and makes testing with this meter a worthless endeavor. With the Compact Plus I am confident that my readings are within a 5 to 6 point range and that is close enough to tell me if my food and exercise choices have been successful, 17 points is not. Dr. Bernstein's complaint with the Compact is that the readings are low and I agree but based on my lab tests they are between 6 and 10 points low and I just adjust for that. I just bought the new Aviva plus strips and tested last night and this morning and I am quite impressed with only a 6 point variance last night at bed time 105,107,106,101,101 and a 5 point variance this morning upon waking 99,96,97,95,99! This is as good or slightly better than the Compact and the Aviva takes up blood into the test strip much easier that the Compact, is smaller in size, and is closer in calibration to  lab tests. By the way I did the test on the exact meter that has a variance of 17 points with the older version of Aviva strips. I must mention that all meters seem to be more consistent in certain parameters and when readings get high (above 130) the total variance seems to be much greater. I do not imagine that meters are going to get much more consistent than a 5 to 6 point variance and I had stopped searching for a more consistent meter when I found the Compact Plus. I am curious to know the variance parameters of the new Nova Max Plus in a five test sequence squeezing five successive drops of blood from the same finger prick site. When even Dr. Bernstein would recommend a meter that has a variance of 17 points I think it is important to include actual test performance data with a recommendation or else that recommendation does not tell you enough.

  • Anonymous
    anonymous
    Apr. 09, 2012

    from amazon:

     

    100 strips for $34.68

     

    meter for $9.49

     

    other internet sources have similar pricing...

     

    accuracy and affordability? is this some kind of cruel hoax?   :-)

     

    double thanks! david

     

    all we need for a trifecta is for the insurance companies to accept their product

  • Anonymous
    anonymous
    Apr. 09, 2012

    what delightful news! perhaps other manufacturers will follow suit and start giving us our money's worth...thanks! for the good news, david