Treatment

Think Like a Pancreas

David Mendosa Health Guide August 01, 2012
  • To think like a pancreas is to come as close as possible to matching your insulin level to what your body actually needs. This is what your body would do automatically if you didn’t have diabetes. But with a little help from insulin injections or an insulin pump and a lot of guidance about how ...

5 Comments
  • Darlene Lyons
    Sep. 01, 2012

    I have read Gary's book and really, really enjoyed it. He explains things so well and helped me better understand this Diabetic Disease I have. I too use a carb to insulin ratio at each meal. For breakfast it is 1u/12 carbs and at lunch/supper it is 1u/25 carbs. This works great for me. It is not complicated but rather simple. I keep a daily food log and for...

    RHMLucky777

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    I have read Gary's book and really, really enjoyed it. He explains things so well and helped me better understand this Diabetic Disease I have. I too use a carb to insulin ratio at each meal. For breakfast it is 1u/12 carbs and at lunch/supper it is 1u/25 carbs. This works great for me. It is not complicated but rather simple. I keep a daily food log and for each meal total my carbs [read the labels] and divide by my formula from my endrocrinologist. This tells me exactly how much Insulin I need, of course I must adjust it accordingly bases on my pre-meal blood glucose numbers. I would highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to better understand this disease, it is a good investment.

  • LaurenceChalem
    Aug. 01, 2012

    To not take low-carbohydrate eating into account is simply to not understand diabetes or human nutrition at all.  Anyone that promulgates guidelines of eating carbohydrates and taking insulin to people that are maladapted to carbohydrates is not just misinformed, but down-right criminal.  It amounts to practicing medicine without a license.  Fraud....

    RHMLucky777

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    To not take low-carbohydrate eating into account is simply to not understand diabetes or human nutrition at all.  Anyone that promulgates guidelines of eating carbohydrates and taking insulin to people that are maladapted to carbohydrates is not just misinformed, but down-right criminal.  It amounts to practicing medicine without a license.  Fraud.  I have been a tye 1 diabetic for the past few decades, and if it weren't for writers like him, I would be in much better shape, as would the other 300,000,000 worldwide diabetics.

    • Anonymous
      Rena
      Aug. 31, 2012
      I was recently a client of Gary Scheiner, and i can tell you that he DOES take low-carb eating into account. It's essentially factored in automatically because the insulin-to-carb ratio is calculated at each meal based on the amount of carbs that are about to be consumed. If you are going to eat only a few carbs, your dose will be lower than if you are eating...
      RHMLucky777
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      I was recently a client of Gary Scheiner, and i can tell you that he DOES take low-carb eating into account. It's essentially factored in automatically because the insulin-to-carb ratio is calculated at each meal based on the amount of carbs that are about to be consumed. If you are going to eat only a few carbs, your dose will be lower than if you are eating more carbs. You do have to learn how to count (or at least estimate) carbs so that your ratio reflects what you are eating.
    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Aug. 31, 2012

      Dear Rena,

       

      Thank you so much for clarifying that!

       

      David

    • Anonymous
      Rena
      Aug. 31, 2012
      David, Actually I oversimplified the process inadvertently. I don't want to mislead anyone, so let me try again. One's insulin-to-carb ratio is determined over a period of trial-and-error and looking for patterns in BS levels after meals. It can differ for the three meals a day and snacks, because one uses and absorbs insulin differently at various times of...
      RHMLucky777
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      David, Actually I oversimplified the process inadvertently. I don't want to mislead anyone, so let me try again. One's insulin-to-carb ratio is determined over a period of trial-and-error and looking for patterns in BS levels after meals. It can differ for the three meals a day and snacks, because one uses and absorbs insulin differently at various times of the day. For instance, my ratios are 1u Novolog to 5.5 carbs at breakfast, 1 to 8 carbs at lunch, and 1:3 at dinner. An evening snack is 1:6. What I meant to say earlier was that this ratio is APPLIED to the number of carbs being consumed at a given meal (not determined by it), so the result will reflect that intended consumption. If I plan to eat 11C at breakfast, my insulin dose would be 2; if I'm eating 33C, it would be 6. But then this dose then has to be adjusted up or down by a correction factor that takes the current BS level into account. That is determined according to a formula, which I'm sure Gary explains in his book. The end result is the dose you take. It sounds complicated, but it isn't once you work out the ratios and formula, which is what takes time. Then you pretty much internalize your requirements and can use the calculator on your smart phone or, as I do, an old-fashioned mini-calculator that I carry in my purse.