Living With

The Hunger Hormones

David Mendosa Health Guide January 17, 2008
  • We know from the pioneering practice of Dr. Richard K. Bernstein and the late Dr. Robert C. Atkins that following a low-carbohydrate diet is especially powerful for people with diabetes. When we go on a low-carb diet we have much greater control over our blood glucose. We also have a lot less hunger,...

8 Comments
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Feb. 02, 2008

    I have chronic, persistent hunger. And even when I eat low index foods, I still suffer gnawing hunger pain.

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 02, 2008

      I understand hunger on a low glycemic index diet. But I absolutely know from my own experience (and the scientific findings) that there are just two ways to avoid hunger: using Byetta or following a very low-CARB diet.

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Brian
      Feb. 04, 2008

      Thank you immensely for the solid advice . It goes such a long way with a mostly self-managed disease.  Brian.

       

  • Anonymous
    nonegiven
    Jan. 24, 2008

    1.  The brain does NOT need 130 g carb per day.  There are no essential carbohydrates.  There are essential amino acids and essential fatty acids. 

     

    If you run out of energy on a low carb diet then you aren't eating enough fat.

     

    2.  As far as the protein/fat balance, google "rabbit starvation."  Low fat...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    1.  The brain does NOT need 130 g carb per day.  There are no essential carbohydrates.  There are essential amino acids and essential fatty acids. 

     

    If you run out of energy on a low carb diet then you aren't eating enough fat.

     

    2.  As far as the protein/fat balance, google "rabbit starvation."  Low fat is a bad idea.

    • Anonymous
      joanne
      Jan. 30, 2008
      Actually the recommended dietary allowance of carbs is 130 grams and that is because of brain function.  As you decrease the amount of carbs in your diet your body has to burn up fat and protein as fuel.  This leads to dangerous PH balance in the body.  So, we really do need that 130 grams of carbs.  Of course we can function without that...
      RHMLucky777
      Read More
      Actually the recommended dietary allowance of carbs is 130 grams and that is because of brain function.  As you decrease the amount of carbs in your diet your body has to burn up fat and protein as fuel.  This leads to dangerous PH balance in the body.  So, we really do need that 130 grams of carbs.  Of course we can function without that 130 grams but it requires our bodies to compromise our muscles and cause that dangerous PH.  So, it is not necessarily that the brain needs the entire 130 grams but the body needs the 130 grams so that it doesn't have to make alternate fuel for the brain (which only uses carbs/glucose as fuel).
  • Anonymous
    joanne
    Jan. 24, 2008

    I think there are a few things we want to remember about carbs:

    1.  We need to choose nutritionally beneficial carbs---for example, fresh fruits, 100% whole wheat items, potatoes with skin, brown rice and pastas etc.

    2.  We need to be consistant about our intake.  Shooting for possibly 30 grams of carbs at each meal and 15 at each snack. ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I think there are a few things we want to remember about carbs:

    1.  We need to choose nutritionally beneficial carbs---for example, fresh fruits, 100% whole wheat items, potatoes with skin, brown rice and pastas etc.

    2.  We need to be consistant about our intake.  Shooting for possibly 30 grams of carbs at each meal and 15 at each snack.  Rather than 60 at one meal and then only 10 at another.

    3.  Remember that the brain does need 130 grams of carbs per day for healthy function.

    I love this topic and would be happy to talk more about it.

    Joanne Rinker MS, RD, CDE, LDN

    I am a diabetes coach for www.fit4d.com 

    jrinker@fit4d.com

  • Anonymous
    Art Seaton
    Jan. 20, 2008

    Larry Scot is a fitness expert. He earned the titles of Mr. America, Mr. Universe, and was the first Mr. Olympia back in the sixties. He is still active and still built like a body builder, although not like he was back in the sixties when he earned those titles. In addition, he was trainer to Arnold Schwarzenegger in his early career, working his way...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Larry Scot is a fitness expert. He earned the titles of Mr. America, Mr. Universe, and was the first Mr. Olympia back in the sixties. He is still active and still built like a body builder, although not like he was back in the sixties when he earned those titles. In addition, he was trainer to Arnold Schwarzenegger in his early career, working his way up through those titles. Also, he has just received a lifetime achievement award for his work in fitness.

     

    Larry Scott provides corespondance training to personal trainers, eventually certifying them. In that training is instruction to finding your personal best carbohydrate/protein ratio. Perhaps he can be convinced to share that secret with us diabetics. (Certainly, someone with your reputation and experience would be more able to convince him that someone like me.)

     

    His web site is at: http://www.larryscott.com/bio/index.cfm

  • Anonymous
    joshv
    Jan. 18, 2008

    On the basis of an unpublished study about a hormone that we don't fully understand you are going to eat less fat?

     

    I regularly lose weight eating 75%-80% of my calories as fat.  And my appetite is definitely supressed.  I don't much care what this study says, a high fat meal makes me full very quickly.