Living With

The Low-Carb Vegetarian

David Mendosa Health Guide February 24, 2008
  • My friend Barry may have a problem. Last Thanksgiving he found out that he has diabetes. Many people go into denial when they get the news. Not Barry, who immediately took control of his condition with a l...

65 Comments
  • Torri
    Jul. 19, 2010

    I have type 1 diabetes, am a vegetarian and I always take this low carb pita bread which is approved as diabetic food. It's delicious and I can feel 'normal' when I eat it, for example stuffed with vegetables. When my friends eat 'forbidden' food I always have my pita bread with me and prepare my own versions of meals. Check high fiber plus diabetic friendly...

    Read More

    I have type 1 diabetes, am a vegetarian and I always take this low carb pita bread which is approved as diabetic food. It's delicious and I can feel 'normal' when I eat it, for example stuffed with vegetables. When my friends eat 'forbidden' food I always have my pita bread with me and prepare my own versions of meals. Check high fiber plus diabetic friendly pita bread.

  • BoulderDiabetic
    Jun. 06, 2010

    Hi to everyone,


    David's friend, Barry here again.


    I wanted to let you know that I created a Facebook group called,

    "The Vegetarian Low Carb Diabetic Healthy Diet Society"

    and have posted many of my vegetarian low carb discoveries there.


    See:

    www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=39690495167


    I invite you to take a look and become a friend. As vegetarian...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi to everyone,


    David's friend, Barry here again.


    I wanted to let you know that I created a Facebook group called,

    "The Vegetarian Low Carb Diabetic Healthy Diet Society"

    and have posted many of my vegetarian low carb discoveries there.


    See:

    www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=39690495167


    I invite you to take a look and become a friend. As vegetarian diabetics, we need to network and learn from each other!


     

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Jun. 06, 2010

      Dear Barry,

       

      Thanks for creating that site and for letting us know about it. It is a valuable resource not only for vegetarians but also for anyone who wants to take charge of his or her diabetes.

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    Samasaur
    Feb. 02, 2010

    Hello! I was wondering if boca original vegan burgers are good for people with hypoglycemia, pre type 2 diabetes, with the works (i.e. whole wheat buns, mayonaise, mustard, etc.) if you could get back to me, that would be very helpful, as i am doing a science fair project! Thank you so much!

     

            ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hello! I was wondering if boca original vegan burgers are good for people with hypoglycemia, pre type 2 diabetes, with the works (i.e. whole wheat buns, mayonaise, mustard, etc.) if you could get back to me, that would be very helpful, as i am doing a science fair project! Thank you so much!

     

             Sincerly,

                   Samantha B.

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 02, 2010

      Dear Samantha,

       

      This is a terrible meal for anyone, in my opinion. First, we do much better when we avoid prepared foods, especially those with so many ingredients: Ingredients: WATER, SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, WHEAT GLUTEN, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF METHYLCELLULOSE, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, DRIED ONIONS, YEAST EXTRACT, SESAME OIL, HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN,...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Samantha,

       

      This is a terrible meal for anyone, in my opinion. First, we do much better when we avoid prepared foods, especially those with so many ingredients: Ingredients: WATER, SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, WHEAT GLUTEN, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF METHYLCELLULOSE, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, DRIED ONIONS, YEAST EXTRACT, SESAME OIL, HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR (NON-MEAT), DISODIUM GUANYLATE, DISODIUM INOSINATE. CONTAINS: SOY, WHEAT, SESAME.

       

      Some of these ingredients are bad food choices, including the soy, the wheat gluten, the hydrolyzed wheat protein, and the sesame. I could write articles about each of these but will refrain. The whole wheat bun is perhaps the worst ingredient but almost all mayo is too high in omega-6 fats. Avoid this like the plague!

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Sep. 30, 2009

    Quorn makes delicious vegetarian products.  I was been a vegetarian for a number of years and found Quorn products when I could no longer eat soy, the main ingredient of so many meatless 'meats'.  A few weeks ago I decided to go vegan and when I reread the ingredients in Quorn I found they have egg whites in them.  So vegetarians...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Quorn makes delicious vegetarian products.  I was been a vegetarian for a number of years and found Quorn products when I could no longer eat soy, the main ingredient of so many meatless 'meats'.  A few weeks ago I decided to go vegan and when I reread the ingredients in Quorn I found they have egg whites in them.  So vegetarians enjoy and vegans go soy!

  • Anonymous
    Kimber G
    Jul. 16, 2009

    Dear David,


    Thank you so much for compiling these wonderful resources.  I was vegetarian for many years, but about 7 years ago, I began eating meat again.  At the time, my husband was thrilled, but now his health has begun to deteriorate, and he has switched to a vegetarian lifestyle.  I had been resisting switching back, having become comfortable...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Dear David,


    Thank you so much for compiling these wonderful resources.  I was vegetarian for many years, but about 7 years ago, I began eating meat again.  At the time, my husband was thrilled, but now his health has begun to deteriorate, and he has switched to a vegetarian lifestyle.  I had been resisting switching back, having become comfortable with the convenience of the starch, protein, and vegetable on the plate mentality; until yesterday.  My husband returned from the doctors with the news that he is now diabetic (at 45), and has metabolic syndrome, which means he is at greater risk of stroke and heart disease as well.

    Today, I am searching the web, going to the library, and learning how to cook all over again!  I am book-marking your site as a great source of information, and sending it to several friends as well.


    Thank you again all of the information and resources.

    Sincerely,

    Kimber G

  • drwho1nd
    Jun. 29, 2009

    Many years ago a friend of mine wrote a book just for this purpose. Her husband was diabetic and vegetarian. Here is the updated version and appropriate information:

    The Whole Foods Diabetic Cookbook

    by Patricia Stevenson; Michael Cook and Patricia Bertron, R.D.

    ISBN-10: 157067129X

    ISBN-13: 978-1570671296

     

    It is available at Amazon.com

     

    I hope this...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Many years ago a friend of mine wrote a book just for this purpose. Her husband was diabetic and vegetarian. Here is the updated version and appropriate information:

    The Whole Foods Diabetic Cookbook

    by Patricia Stevenson; Michael Cook and Patricia Bertron, R.D.

    ISBN-10: 157067129X

    ISBN-13: 978-1570671296

     

    It is available at Amazon.com

     

    I hope this will be helpful to those of you who are vegetarian or want to be.

     

     

     

     

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Jan. 01, 2009

    THE BOOK IS CALLED LOW CARB VEGETARIAN BY MARGO DEMELLO AND ANOTHER

    GOOD ONE IS CALLED THE SOY ZONE BY BARRY SEARS, YOUR FRIEND SHOULD CONCENTRATE ON LOW SUGAR RAW FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, I AM VEGAN ALSO.

    IT'S THE BEST DIET. HOPE THIS HELPS.

  • Harry
    Oct. 23, 2008

    I like Dr G. Cousens MD's book There is a Cure for Diabetes in which he discusses going low carb raw vegetarian. He uses a low carb juice fast to clean you out to begin with and then u8ses a low carb leafy green vegetarian diet to get you off all the meds.

    Harry Dorrington

  • Anonymous
    Paula
    Oct. 02, 2008

    Hi David,

     

    In response to your friend Barry's situation I have found these books for the veggie low carber. I myself am a vegetarian and I just started low carbing and I also found information to be a bit scarce too. But I purchased a couple of these books and armed with the knowledge of diabetes because my husband is diabetic, I'm doing just fine. My...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi David,

     

    In response to your friend Barry's situation I have found these books for the veggie low carber. I myself am a vegetarian and I just started low carbing and I also found information to be a bit scarce too. But I purchased a couple of these books and armed with the knowledge of diabetes because my husband is diabetic, I'm doing just fine. My husband being a meat eater forces me to be creative with meals so that we can share the same meal experience together, so I make sure meat is not the only high protein part of the meal. I sometimes prepare only vegetarian meals and he finds them very satisfying (because of my creativity of course).

     

    Anyway, I hope that this helps.

     

    Thanks,

    Paula

    Chalmette, LA

     

    Link to books:

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=low+carb+vegetarian+cookbook&x=0&y=0

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Oct. 02, 2008

      Dear Paula,

       

      Great! I will forward your message and the Amazon link to my friend Barry right now. Since he is a good friend, I think that I can get him to loan me any of those books that he buys!

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Aug. 14, 2008

    Indian food from Gujarat is vegetarian (more than other states) as most Gujaratis are vegetarian for religious reasons. 

     

    You can eat all the different dals and shaks(lo carb vegetables), yoghurt, milk, cheese. 

    Omit the rice and may be have a rotli once in a while. 

     

    There are so many different dals that you will have a great variety. ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Indian food from Gujarat is vegetarian (more than other states) as most Gujaratis are vegetarian for religious reasons. 

     

    You can eat all the different dals and shaks(lo carb vegetables), yoghurt, milk, cheese. 

    Omit the rice and may be have a rotli once in a while. 

     

    There are so many different dals that you will have a great variety. 

     

    You can also get Karela(bitter melon) that is good for Diabetes per Ayurveda - there are many ways to make it to decrease the bitterness - I love the bitterness and even eat it raw (the small ones) It's one of my favorites.  You can grow it easily in California. 

     

    You can also buy a lot of other Indian vegetables also like bhinda(okra), eggplant(ringana), Turia, Parval, Tindora which can be prepared in many different ways.  I can send some recipes but you can also find on line, just omit adding any sugar. 

     

    Also you can get Indian spices like Turmeric, cumin, coriander etc. to make recipes with.  It is easy to make these.

     

    You can get chana dal and chana lot to make thepla with instead.

     

    You have so much variety of food available than just tofu and seitan.

     

    Find at Indian grocery store.  Or most now available at whole foods.

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Aug. 14, 2008

      Thanks for your tips!

       

      You mention that okra is available at Indian grocery stores. I love okra and it is seldom available at Whole Foods, where I usually shop, much less regular supermarkets. But my experience confirms what you write, since my local Indian grocery carries it and I buy it there.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

  • BoulderDiabetic
    Aug. 07, 2008

    Hi all, 

     

    I just came back to this blog and am impressed with all the great input from everyone! What a great place to share experiences and discoveries... I thought to give an update on my progress as I've settled in to eating low carb vegetarian. 

     

    Since being diagnosed type 1 in November 2007 with a1c of 11, I was since rediagnosised...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi all, 

     

    I just came back to this blog and am impressed with all the great input from everyone! What a great place to share experiences and discoveries... I thought to give an update on my progress as I've settled in to eating low carb vegetarian. 

     

    Since being diagnosed type 1 in November 2007 with a1c of 11, I was since rediagnosised as type 2, with a current a1c at 5.8 and have lost 37 lbs!

     

    My low carb vegetarian Bernstein-like diet is what I attribute to the changes, and I continue to feel better than I have in decades. 

     

    Some vegetarian zero to very low carb discoveries to share:

     

    Morningstar breakfast patties and Boca Burgers from Costco

     

    Nature's Life Pro-Life 0% carb soy protein powder (25 gms!) mixed in to unsweetened Blue Diamond Almond Breeze almond milk (or homemade; 1 part almonds to 4 parts water in a blender), sweetened with Sweetleaf flavored liquid stevia (1 drop per ounce)

     

    Root-beer flavored liquid Sweetleaf stevia with Perrier water

     

    Ultima Replenisher flavored electrolyte powder and spring water

     

    SushiParty Soy Wrappers by Yamamotoyama (or nori seaweed sheets) for creative veggie wraps, to use around LightLife TofuPups tofu hot dogs, with mustard and pro-biotic sauerkraut, or avocado, lettuce, sprouts, shredded cheese, or pesto, mozzarella, tomato, basil, lettuce, kinds of sandwiches

     

    Canned black soy beans by EdenSoy for added protein, mixed into those great stir fried green leafy kale, chard and other non starchy vegetables, stirred in olive oil, over Shirataki Tofu Noodles by House Brand (3 varieties)

     

    Homemade flax and chia seed curried crackers

     

    Ground cacao nips with organic raspberries, chocolate unsweetened almond milk and dark chocolate stevia sweetened frozen desserts...

     

    These are a few of my favorite very low carb delights. Please post more of yours!

     

    Sincerely, 

     

    Barry from Boulder

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Aug. 07, 2008

      Dear Barry,

       

      Thanks for you comment with all your tips. You remind me that I need to get more SushiParty Soy Wrappers by Yamamotoyama (or nori seaweed sheets) .

       

      David

  • HIGHLANDERGIRL
    Mar. 05, 2008

    DEAR MR MENDOSA,

     

    HERE IS SOME IMFORMATION FOR YOU.....GARDENWEB.COM ANDTHE BOOK NAME IS ROSE ELLIOTSVEGETARIAN LOW CARB DIET. I JUST LOOKED THIS UP I WILL CHECK IT OUT MYSELF. THE LADY THAT WROTE ABOUT THIS BOOK HAS LOST 15-20 LBS.

     

    TAKE CARE,

     

    KATHLEEN STECKEL

    HARLEYLOVER56@AOL.COM

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 05, 2008

      Dear Kathleen,

       

      Thank you. Sounds good!

       

      David 

  • Anonymous
    Deana Buksas
    Mar. 02, 2008

    I posed this same questions to Askville from Amazon. Com and this is what I got back.

     

    Month of Meals:  Vegeterian Pleasures for People with Diabetes.

     

    Low-Carb Vegetarian by Margo DeMello

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 02, 2008

      Dear Deana,

       

      Yes, that's one of the low-carb vegetarian books that I mentioned in my comment above. But what a good idea to use Askville! I had never thought of doing that before.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

  • Pam Cobo
    Mar. 02, 2008

    What a great post.  I am a vegetarian and a T2 diabetic.  I've been experimenting with various recipes recently.  My favorite combines broccoli, Quorn or Morninstar Chicken Strips and Imagine No-Chik broth with mushrooms added in. All combined in a big bowl.  I had been including brown rice but the rice spiked...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    What a great post.  I am a vegetarian and a T2 diabetic.  I've been experimenting with various recipes recently.  My favorite combines broccoli, Quorn or Morninstar Chicken Strips and Imagine No-Chik broth with mushrooms added in. All combined in a big bowl.  I had been including brown rice but the rice spiked my sugar level, so no more rice!  Along with a good size salad, this is a very satisfying meal.  I can't wait to check out the cookbooks noted in a previous comment.  Once again, this site has been a great source of info.

     

    Pam

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 02, 2008

      Dear Pam,

       

      Thank you for your support. And also for your recipe ideas!

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

  • Anonymous
    Jean
    Mar. 02, 2008
    Thanks for this article - I've been a vegetarian for 18 years and diagnosed w/diabetes type 2 for 1 year. It isn't easy being a vegetarian in American culture in the first place and, when faced with eliminating grains and beans, it gets a little more complicated. But we're already used to the eating challenge and it certainly isn't...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More
    Thanks for this article - I've been a vegetarian for 18 years and diagnosed w/diabetes type 2 for 1 year. It isn't easy being a vegetarian in American culture in the first place and, when faced with eliminating grains and beans, it gets a little more complicated. But we're already used to the eating challenge and it certainly isn't impossible. At the recommendation of my dietician, I'm using protein powder - had never had it before and it seems so "fake" but, that, along with tofu and cheese and the veggie versions of protein, plus soy milk and I'm doing just great. Wonderful to know I've got company.
    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 02, 2008

      Dear Jean,

       

      My favorite Certified Diabetes Educator also likes a protein powder drink. But I have resisted because the main thing that I have to do is to keep controlling my weight.

       

      And it looks to me, on the basis of what I have read and reported on here that drinking calories do contribute to weight gain. Please check out my article, "Drinking...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Jean,

       

      My favorite Certified Diabetes Educator also likes a protein powder drink. But I have resisted because the main thing that I have to do is to keep controlling my weight.

       

      And it looks to me, on the basis of what I have read and reported on here that drinking calories do contribute to weight gain. Please check out my article, "Drinking Calories" at http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/17/13299/drinking-calories/

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Jean
      Mar. 02, 2008

      David, I appreciate your reply and understand and agree with the view that drinking calories can contribute to weight gain. However, for me, the soy milk w/protein powder drink in the morning is the only breakfast that gets me to lunch without being ravenous and unable to focus by 11:00.

      I have learned much from your columns and look forward...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      David, I appreciate your reply and understand and agree with the view that drinking calories can contribute to weight gain. However, for me, the soy milk w/protein powder drink in the morning is the only breakfast that gets me to lunch without being ravenous and unable to focus by 11:00.

      I have learned much from your columns and look forward to the next one. Have you been to Linda's low carb recipe site? Not every recipe is vegetarian, but she does have some, and she's a terrific, inventive cook:

      http://www.genaw.com/lowcarb/index.html

      All best, Jean

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 02, 2008

      Dear Jean,

       

      Thanks. I will check out that site.

       

      You mention that the protein powder drink is the only thing that doesn't feed your hunger. Yes, most breakfasts do actually make you want to eat more -- because most breakfasts have a lot of carbs. But I have found when I limit my carb intake at breakfast to 6 grams or less, with anything that has...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Jean,

       

      Thanks. I will check out that site.

       

      You mention that the protein powder drink is the only thing that doesn't feed your hunger. Yes, most breakfasts do actually make you want to eat more -- because most breakfasts have a lot of carbs. But I have found when I limit my carb intake at breakfast to 6 grams or less, with anything that has this small amount (e.g. even the good old standby of bacon and eggs), I don't get hungry. It it the CARBS that make you ravenous!

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Mar. 02, 2008

     

    you may find all books by Dr.Ann Wigmore of interest. Just go raw, eat plenty of green vegs, preferably blended with a sour apple and some linseeds to bind the mixture. It is simple and deliciuos.

    Take greens, nuts, raw vegs, and some fruit.

    You can eat also beetroot etc, just take a little and raw.You won't want much of that strong tasting veg anyway.But...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

     

    you may find all books by Dr.Ann Wigmore of interest. Just go raw, eat plenty of green vegs, preferably blended with a sour apple and some linseeds to bind the mixture. It is simple and deliciuos.

    Take greens, nuts, raw vegs, and some fruit.

    You can eat also beetroot etc, just take a little and raw.You won't want much of that strong tasting veg anyway.But a little for decoration will make a nice change.

    It is fun to eat raw vegan food.

    With cordial greetings, Sabine.

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 02, 2008

      Dear Sabine,

       

      I am strongly attracted to the idea of eating raw food. But just like eating a total vegetarian diet, I am not to that point -- at least yet.

       

      A whole lot of my diet is raw. Salad forms a whole meal of mine every day. I love the "Go Raw" products, particularly their "Flax Snax" (www.goraw.com).

       

      This is why I was...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Sabine,

       

      I am strongly attracted to the idea of eating raw food. But just like eating a total vegetarian diet, I am not to that point -- at least yet.

       

      A whole lot of my diet is raw. Salad forms a whole meal of mine every day. I love the "Go Raw" products, particularly their "Flax Snax" (www.goraw.com).

       

      This is why I was so disturbed by the report out of Italy that cooking actually makes nutrients in some foods more available. That's why I wrote about that here, "Raw Isn't Always Better" at http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/17/20403/raw-isnt/ 

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Mar. 02, 2008

      Dear David,

      thanks for your reply. I am writing from Germany and have just come back from work. My father was diagnosed with diabetes 2 recently and has to take injections by now. He doesn't want to cut down on food, because he never wants to hunger again the way he did, when he was a child in ww2nd, he will not comprehend, that eating too much actually...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear David,

      thanks for your reply. I am writing from Germany and have just come back from work. My father was diagnosed with diabetes 2 recently and has to take injections by now. He doesn't want to cut down on food, because he never wants to hunger again the way he did, when he was a child in ww2nd, he will not comprehend, that eating too much actually shortens life.So all my talk is to no avail and infact, I have given up.Together we found your homepage.I found it through Italy and sent it to my father who thought I wanted to 'patronize' him again, until he found you and was happy about your info himself.I am so far free of diabetes, don't believe it, but have been a chocoholic all my life.

      My ideal would be to be completely raw, but I can't follow it trough either.I find the little films on YouTube by the raw family, the Boutenko family quite interesting.You may look there for inspiration.They are a very interesting family.Their son overcame diabetes 1,I believe, with a completely raw diet.They describe it in their books.

      Best regards from Frankfurt,

      Sabine.

  • Insulin Free
    Feb. 27, 2008

    Hi!

     

    A nice starting point is Dr. Neal Bernard's Program for Reversing Diabetes.  He claims his recipes as lo-carb, and I believe all of them are probably fine for most -- thus may be helpful to you, but I seem to need extreme lo-carb.  Some of the things I eat are a modified version of his pancakes:

        4 T. Kashi 7-Whole Grain...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi!

     

    A nice starting point is Dr. Neal Bernard's Program for Reversing Diabetes.  He claims his recipes as lo-carb, and I believe all of them are probably fine for most -- thus may be helpful to you, but I seem to need extreme lo-carb.  Some of the things I eat are a modified version of his pancakes:

        4 T. Kashi 7-Whole Grain Pilaf, 3 heaping T. soy nuts,

    2 T. almond -- add one c. water and grind in blender.

        In separate bowl, 2 heaping T. soy flour, 1 t. aluminum free baking powder, 1/2 - 3/4 t. baking soda, 1/2 - 1 t. cinnamon -- per your taste, stevia to taste.

        Add the ground ingredients to the dry ingredients, then add 1 T. lemon juice (fresh is best), mix by hand and cook in Macadamia nut oil (my preference). 

        I do require vegan butter on these to enjoy them, but for pancakes they seem to be relatively easy on my blood sugars.

     

        I have recently discovered coconut flour (90% of the carbs are fiber) though I had to buy it on the net and on the net it said that it required eggs to work right -- but I'm experimenting with it right now and have actually found that I can make a crisp topping that I love (no eggs, but I did cheat as a vegan and used ghee -- or clarified butter -- I'm going to try it again with Macadamia oil in the near future)  I put it on a mixture of almonds, cashews, and sunflower seed along with some Slimstyles PGX powder (additional fiber sweetened with stevia having an orangey flavor available from  Life Extension Foundation) and it actually reduced my blood sugars.

         

        The recipe I have used is:

     

    Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 

     

        1 c. coconut flour

        1 c. wheat gluten

        1 T. baking powder

        3/4 t. salt

        4 T. clarified butter

        1 c. soy milk

     

    Put dry ingredients into a bowl, mix together.

    Blend in butter with a fork into fine particles

    Add milk and stir until the particles cling together

    Pour out into the bottom of a glass pan

    Bake for 15-20 minutes.

     

    I actually tried some fruit spread baked into the middle of a portion of this and it was excellent if your system can handle the sugar -- my couldn't... However, I'm every bit as happy with the taste of this on the nut mix.

     

        I also eat some of the prepackaged food bars made by Organic Food Bar Company.  I find my system is happy with both the Protein and Active Greens versions -- and would probably be happy with some of the other flavors, too, but I tend to overeat when I have a case of the Belgian chocolate in the house.

     

        Also good is and open faced sandwich made with sunflower seed rye bread and tofurky (I like the Italian flavored one) and drizzle a small amount of olive oil on the bread to keep it from being dry and yet still heart healthy and completely vegan.

     

        I'm going to keep experimenting.  Let me know if you want me to keep you updated.

     

    Sincerely,

        Myrna (former heavy weight and insulin user -- now svelte vegan and insulin free!)

     

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 28, 2008

      Dear Myrna,

       

      Thank you for your comment and please do keep us updated. Congratulations too on your success. Please let us know how many grams of carbohydrates you eat each day. I hope it's less than Dr. Bernard recommends!

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Insulin Free
      Feb. 29, 2008

      Hi Again David,

       

      I don't count my carbs by the day, but rather by what I know my body can handle at one time depending upon my starting sugars and my intended upcoming activity.  The greatest quantity of carbs I would typically consume at any one time is 28 net, and that is only if I know that I will be engaged in active movement after eating. ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Hi Again David,

       

      I don't count my carbs by the day, but rather by what I know my body can handle at one time depending upon my starting sugars and my intended upcoming activity.  The greatest quantity of carbs I would typically consume at any one time is 28 net, and that is only if I know that I will be engaged in active movement after eating.  If I won't be doing something active, I might eat a tofurky

      "sausage" with 2 pcs of kavli 5-grain crispbread for a total of 17 carb grams (6 of that being fiber).  I do eat frequently.  Just out of curiosity I did figure out that I ate 115 carb grams today (39 of which was fiber) but I also walked 6 miles today.

       

      My favorite place at which to eat out is our local Mongolian Grill.  They stock tofu!  So my meat loving husband and son and I can all eat happily at one place.  They eat the meat and noodles and I eat the tofu and veggies. 

       

      I also forgot to mention that I do sometimes use chia seed, which I assume you are already familiar with.  While it definitely has a positive impact on my blood sugar control, I have food sensitivities and it gives me a skin rash if I consume more than about 1/4 t. every other day.

       

      Wishing you well,

      Sincerely,

      Myrna 

       

       

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 29, 2008

      Dear Myrna,

       

      You are so right to be talking about your exercise together with your diet. They do go together.

       

      I would say that you eat a lower-carb diet. The standard diet is more than 130 grams (and I don't remember seeing whether that is total or net). I understand a very low-carb diet to be less than 42 grams of total carbohydrate per day (ala...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Myrna,

       

      You are so right to be talking about your exercise together with your diet. They do go together.

       

      I would say that you eat a lower-carb diet. The standard diet is more than 130 grams (and I don't remember seeing whether that is total or net). I understand a very low-carb diet to be less than 42 grams of total carbohydrate per day (ala Bernstein) or less than 45 grams per day (total or net unspecified) by doctors like Jeff Gerber in Denver (his Denver diet). That's what I am following.

       

      Chia seeds? Absolutely. See my article here at: http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/17/17801/chia-seeds/

       

      Too bad that you are sensitive to them in substantial amounts. I sure am not. But I guess that it's a good thing (although complicated) that we are all different. 

  • Mark Benjes
    Feb. 26, 2008

    I'm sorry, but there is no truth in the UN report on Livestocks effect on the environment. All you have to do is look in your mouth at your teeth and realize that humans need to eat both plants and animals.

     

    Cattle digest grass and legume plant materials much better than humans, and humans get more benefit from eating a steak than alfalfa or grass.

     ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I'm sorry, but there is no truth in the UN report on Livestocks effect on the environment. All you have to do is look in your mouth at your teeth and realize that humans need to eat both plants and animals.

     

    Cattle digest grass and legume plant materials much better than humans, and humans get more benefit from eating a steak than alfalfa or grass.

     

    It also appears that many of the low fat, high in soy protein diets cause more problems for humans and contribute to inflamation, which is the real problem that causes heart attacks, not cholestrol levels. 

  • Anonymous
    Mark Whitcombe
    Feb. 26, 2008

    Check out http://www.ap-foodtechnology.com/news/ng.asp?n=83517-vegetables-antioxidants-diabetes"

    “A higher intake of vegetables, rich sources of fibre, antioxidants, and magnesium, may reduce the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by almost 30 per cent, suggests a new study.

    “On the flip side of the coin, however, an increased consumption...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More

    Check out http://www.ap-foodtechnology.com/news/ng.asp?n=83517-vegetables-antioxidants-diabetes"

    “A higher intake of vegetables, rich sources of fibre, antioxidants, and magnesium, may reduce the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by almost 30 per cent, suggests a new study.

    “On the flip side of the coin, however, an increased consumption of fruit was not associated with any benefits, according to the study with 64,191 middle-aged Chinese women published in the new issue of the Journal of Nutrition. 
    "Our study adds to the limited and conflicting data of the associations between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of type-2 diabetes," wrote lead author Raquel Villegas from Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center.
    "A higher intake of vegetables, rich in fibre, antioxidants, and magnesium and with a low glycemic index, was associated with a decreased risk of type-2 diabetes."

    “The mechanism by which vegetables affect glucose tolerance has not been clearly defined but may be associated with the high content of antioxidants, fibre, and magnesium or the low glycemic index in vegetables," stated the authors.”

     

    Interesting ... Veggies, not fruits, decrease the risk of Type 2.

    I note the point about the low glycemic index, which seems thrown in almost at the last moment. Of the four possible mechanisms, isn’t it the only one that has a significant evidence base? 

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 27, 2008

      Dear Mark,

       

      One of the very few givens in this developing field of nutrition is that green leafy vegetables are healthy. Almost all of us would benefit by eating more of them. It also seems that eating more fiber is good for us, although earlier studies that indicated it would help prevent colon cancer have not been verified.

       

      However, much of nutrition...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Mark,

       

      One of the very few givens in this developing field of nutrition is that green leafy vegetables are healthy. Almost all of us would benefit by eating more of them. It also seems that eating more fiber is good for us, although earlier studies that indicated it would help prevent colon cancer have not been verified.

       

      However, much of nutrition is in the midst of the greatest uproar in history right now. Beliefs for the last half century that fat -- and particularly saturated fat -- would lead us to high cholesterol levels and eventually death by heart attack -- are being challenged like never before.

       

      Therefore, I can't stress strongly enough the impact that the 2007 book by Gary Taubes, Good Calories, Bad Calories, has had on me. I can't recommend it enough to you.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Mark W
      Feb. 27, 2008

      I’ll second your recommendation of Taubes’ book, David. It’s been hard to read even though I have at least some background in biology and biochemistry and physiology.

      Taubes has radically re-shaped not only my way of thinking about my diabetes but has also provided a rationale and explanation for changing my way of eating.

      (I should have added...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      I’ll second your recommendation of Taubes’ book, David. It’s been hard to read even though I have at least some background in biology and biochemistry and physiology.

      Taubes has radically re-shaped not only my way of thinking about my diabetes but has also provided a rationale and explanation for changing my way of eating.

      (I should have added to my earlier post about fruit not leading to a reduction in Type 2 diabetes by drawing a potential/likely connection between the relatively high levels of fructose in fruits and the different way fructose is metabolized by the liver and their resultant effect on fat deposition in the body. A much more plausible explanation than anti-oxidants, perhaps?) 

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 04, 2008

      Dear Mark,

       

      Good article! Thanks for posting a summary of it. While it's hard to define "significant," I think that all four factors have some evidence for them. Fiber, antioxidants, and magnesium are all factors that I have written separate articles here in support of them in our diet. Of course, I have also written a lot about the glycemic...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Mark,

       

      Good article! Thanks for posting a summary of it. While it's hard to define "significant," I think that all four factors have some evidence for them. Fiber, antioxidants, and magnesium are all factors that I have written separate articles here in support of them in our diet. Of course, I have also written a lot about the glycemic index. It sure is interesting that fruit doesn't rate as highly. Personally, I eat a LOT of veggies and very little fruit except those "honorary vegetables," tomatoes and avocados.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

  • verdungal
    Feb. 26, 2008

    A very intersting post, David.   The Vegetarian Low-carb Diet Cookbook 
    by Rose Elliot sounds interesting.  You can check this out on Google.

    Joan Mercantini 

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 27, 2008

      Dear Joan,

       

      As you suggested, I Googled this cookbook. What a great help you are!

       

      Not only did I find it, but also found links to these other low-carb vegetarian cookbooks on Amazon:

       

      Low Carb Vegetarian by Margo Demello

       

       

      Low-Carb Vegetarian by Celia Brooks Brown

       

      The Protein-Powered Vegetarian: From Meat... by Bo Sebastian

       ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Joan,

       

      As you suggested, I Googled this cookbook. What a great help you are!

       

      Not only did I find it, but also found links to these other low-carb vegetarian cookbooks on Amazon:

       

      Low Carb Vegetarian by Margo Demello

       

       

      Low-Carb Vegetarian by Celia Brooks Brown

       

      The Protein-Powered Vegetarian: From Meat... by Bo Sebastian

       

      Carb Conscious Vegetarian: 150 Delicious R... by Robin Robertson

       

      The Vegetarian Low-Carb Diet: The Fast, No... by Rose Elliot

       

      Low-Carb Vegetarian Cooking: 150 Entrees to Make Low-Carb Vegetarian Cooking Easy and Fun [BARGAIN PRICE] (Paperback)
      by Sue Spitler (Author), Linda R. Yoakam (Author) 

       

      I am telling Barry about these books so that he can buy them -- and loan them to me.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • verdungal
      Mar. 03, 2008

      David

      Why doesn't Barry check  his local library for cookbooks on Low Carb Vegetarian Meals instead of buying them.   He could even suggest to the librarian to buy some for the library if they don't have any .  Don't forget, he can always check  out  the library catalogue through the web.  

       

      Joan

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 03, 2008

      Dear Joan,

       

      Good idea. I will pass that on to Barry right now. It is what I always do first. Here in Colorado we have a wonderful inter-library loan system where all the book resources in the state (and in Wyoming) are available for ordering with a click on the website.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Joe Gallace
      Mar. 04, 2008

       

        David, you mentioned in your article that beans are high-carb.

        However, if you take a look at Romano beans and White kidney beans

        you will notice that these high-fiber but quite low carb as well as

        high-protein.

                           ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

       

        David, you mentioned in your article that beans are high-carb.

        However, if you take a look at Romano beans and White kidney beans

        you will notice that these high-fiber but quite low carb as well as

        high-protein.

                            Joe G.

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 04, 2008

      Dear Joe,

       

      You're right. Not all beans are high in net carbs. My friend Barry just discovered black soybeans from Eden that are quite low in net carbs.

       

      I wasn't familiar with romano beans either. But http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/108404.html does show that they are low in net carbs. Thanks for pointing this out! 

       

      But...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Joe,

       

      You're right. Not all beans are high in net carbs. My friend Barry just discovered black soybeans from Eden that are quite low in net carbs.

       

      I wasn't familiar with romano beans either. But http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/108404.html does show that they are low in net carbs. Thanks for pointing this out! 

       

      But white kidney beans, at least according to http://nutrican.fshn.uiuc.edu/tables/Whitekidneys.html are pretty high in carbs. The USDA site hasn't evaluated them. What's your source? 

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Joe Gallace
      Mar. 05, 2008

       

        Here are samples from the same site:

       

          white kidney beans: total net carbs are:  12g/130g about 9%

          http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/105856.html

       

         mung beans: net carbs are: 23.3g/202g  about 11%

         http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/16081.html

       

        ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

       

        Here are samples from the same site:

       

          white kidney beans: total net carbs are:  12g/130g about 9%

          http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/105856.html

       

         mung beans: net carbs are: 23.3g/202g  about 11%

         http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/16081.html

       

         black beans : net carbs:  11g/127g  about 9%

         http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/104573.html  

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 05, 2008

      Dear Joe,

       

      Thank you. But those are not low net carb numbers. Each of these beans has 11-12 grams of net carbs per 1/2 cup, according to your references.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Joe G
      Mar. 05, 2008

       

         I suggest that more research is required before we can

         have definitive numbers on true carbs for some beans.

         Eg. I found the following listing for kidney beans

         

                http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c20bV.html

       

         ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

       

         I suggest that more research is required before we can

         have definitive numbers on true carbs for some beans.

         Eg. I found the following listing for kidney beans

         

                http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c20bV.html

       

          which gives only 5g carbs per 100g weight

       

                                      Joe G.

    • Anonymous
      Joe G
      Mar. 12, 2008

        In case you are interested, there is another bean

      with lots of fiber but almost no carbs, it is the

      "Lupini" bean. It tastes like peas and should be available

      at your supermarked canned.

                                 ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

        In case you are interested, there is another bean

      with lots of fiber but almost no carbs, it is the

      "Lupini" bean. It tastes like peas and should be available

      at your supermarked canned.

                                  Regards,

                                  Joe

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 12, 2008

      Dear Joe,

       

      Thank you. This dialog is interesting. But what's your source? According to http://www.calorieking.com/foods/calories-in-vegetables-packaged-italian-specialties-lupini-beans-bottled_f-Y2lkPTM0MzUyJmJpZD0xNjAyJmZpZD05NzkzMCZwYXI9.html lupini beans, like most beans, are high in carbs.

       

      David 

    • Anonymous
      Joe G.
      Mar. 12, 2008

       

       I tend to believe labels. The one I have in front of me is

       on a can of UNICO Lupini Beans, which says that it contains

       16 g of carbs and 16g of fiber which means no net carbs

       per 1/2 cup (126 ml).

                           Regards,

                          ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

       

       I tend to believe labels. The one I have in front of me is

       on a can of UNICO Lupini Beans, which says that it contains

       16 g of carbs and 16g of fiber which means no net carbs

       per 1/2 cup (126 ml).

                           Regards,

                           Joe

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Mar. 12, 2008

      Dear Joe,

       

      That's the difference between us then. I have learned from bitter experience not to believe labels. The FDA allows wide latitude and seldom enforces mistatements. My favorite Greek-style yogurt, for example, has widely different carb counts on its label and its website. The company tells me that the website is correct, but I really don't...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Joe,

       

      That's the difference between us then. I have learned from bitter experience not to believe labels. The FDA allows wide latitude and seldom enforces mistatements. My favorite Greek-style yogurt, for example, has widely different carb counts on its label and its website. The company tells me that the website is correct, but I really don't know which one to accept.

       

      In the case of lupini beans -- which in the U.S. we generally know as lupin beans -- the U.S. Department of Agriculture differs significantly from the UNICO can that you cite. The National Nutrient Database at http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/cgi-bin/nut_search_new.pl says that 1 cup of "lupins, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt" has 16.4 grams of carbohydrate, of which 4.6 grams is fiber. That's the scientific authority in this country. I don't believe all of its policies but I do accept the facts.

       

      David 

    • verdungal
      Mar. 13, 2008

      You are right on this one David. Just the other day, I  picked up three different brands of Turtle Beans and each of the cans contained different amount of fibre for 1 cup of beans.

      Joan M.

    • Anonymous
      Joe G
      Mar. 15, 2008

         Thanks David, for setting me streight on those labels.

          So, where are we suppose to get reliable info on a product?

       

         Because I am crazy about beans, I did a search at the USDA site for

         "bean" under the "Vegetables & Veg Products",

          I got the following info:

         ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

         Thanks David, for setting me streight on those labels.

          So, where are we suppose to get reliable info on a product?

       

         Because I am crazy about beans, I did a search at the USDA site for

         "bean" under the "Vegetables & Veg Products",

          I got the following info:

         

           (some?)Kidney beans-  NDB No: 11030       net carbs 4.7g /100 g weight

                      pinto beans -   NDB No: 11654       net carbs 4.1g/ 100 g weight

              Shellie beans canned-NDB No: 11050       net carbs 2.8g/ 100g weight

                      mung beans      NDB No: 11044       net carbs 3.4g/ 100 g weight

       

              Regards,

              Joe

    • BoulderDiabetic
      Sep. 10, 2009

      David, FYI... I've recently been staring at the food facts label in our local "health" food store Sunflower, in front of the chocolate covered almonds in their bulk foods section. "Wow! finally a low carb dark chocolate covered almond snack!" I thought... The Sunflower in store food facts label looked great,  but I kept staring at the numbers...  something...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      David, FYI... I've recently been staring at the food facts label in our local "health" food store Sunflower, in front of the chocolate covered almonds in their bulk foods section. "Wow! finally a low carb dark chocolate covered almond snack!" I thought... The Sunflower in store food facts label looked great,  but I kept staring at the numbers...  something just wasn't right. So I thought I'd ask to see the manufacturer's label on the box it comes in. I started with the section clerk, who referred me to the store manager, who brought out the bulk box it was delivered to the store in. Sure enough, no food facts label on the shipping carton. "The food facts are printed at our corporate head quarters."  So, I asked them to contact corporate and verify their label. "The carbohydrates listed don't look correct". I said. After a week, I received phone call, telling me that in fact, I was correct and they were going to correct their food facts labeling in the store. A week later I checked the bulk bin and sure enough, the healthy looking low carb dark chocolate covered almond snack, was now listed with a high carbohydrate rating. 

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Sep. 10, 2009

      Dear Barry,

       

      Good detective work! By the way, I loved the hot chocolate I got on my High Sierra trek and was thinking about chocolate to warm me up today (I hiked up to Arapahoe Pass at 12,000 feet where it's a lot colder than in Boulder). Do you know of any low-carb chocolate drink that tastes good?

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

    • BoulderDiabetic
      Sep. 10, 2009

      David, 

       

      What was the name of that sample of hot chocolate drink I once shared with you that was sweetened with stevia??? ;-)

       

      I know you're not much into cooking, but hot chocolate couldn't be simpler... grind some organic cacao nips into coco powder, or get 100% unsweetened coco alkalized powder, sweeten with erythritol and/or stevia,...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      David, 

       

      What was the name of that sample of hot chocolate drink I once shared with you that was sweetened with stevia??? ;-)

       

      I know you're not much into cooking, but hot chocolate couldn't be simpler... grind some organic cacao nips into coco powder, or get 100% unsweetened coco alkalized powder, sweeten with erythritol and/or stevia, mix in to unsweetened almond milk or unsweetened soy milk... add cinnamon, vanilla extra, nutmeg... however you like it, even a little high fat low carb whipped cream on top  and voila! 

       

       

       

       

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Sep. 11, 2009

      Dear Barry,

       

      I don't remember the sample. But I will shop for your recipe this morning!

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    barry
    Feb. 25, 2008
    Why not just stick to low glycemic index/load veggies to control his carbs for diabetes?

    In:
    Dr. Neal Barnard's program for reversing diabetes: the scientifically proven system for reversing diabetes without drugs / Barnard, Neal D. / 2007 / 
    LP 616.462 Bar
    he advocates a vegan and low fat diet.  He shows that it's the excess fat in the diet that causes...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More
    Why not just stick to low glycemic index/load veggies to control his carbs for diabetes?

    In:
    Dr. Neal Barnard's program for reversing diabetes: the scientifically proven system for reversing diabetes without drugs / Barnard, Neal D. / 2007 / 
    LP 616.462 Bar
    he advocates a vegan and low fat diet.  He shows that it's the excess fat in the diet that causes blood glucose to be too high in diabetics, not excess carbs.  By switching to vegan and low fat, plus plenty of 'good' carbs, one's glucose numbers and A1c should improve, as well as cholesterol, weight, and so on.

    After reading his book I switched from an omnivorous low carb diet to vegan low fat and I lost 5 pounds and had an average daily blood glucose drop of 10 points in the 1st 3 weeks.  That was 4 months ago.  I've dropped another 5 pounds since.  I'm about 90% vegan--I cheat with low fat Splenda yogurt daily and possibly egg & dairy in some breads and veggie burgers, plus poultry around the holidays in Nov & Dec.

    (I'm Type II, diagnosed 2 years ago, not on any meds, just supplements and better diet.  My A1c before the vegan switch was 6.1%.  In a few weeks I'll see what my A1c & cholesterol is post-vegan.)
    • Anonymous
      Barry E
      Feb. 25, 2008

      barry

       

      I'm the 'Barry' David mentioned in the article.  I looked at Barnard's book also. They say I'm type 1, but am not yet in need of insulin. I'd like to keep it that way! In 2 month's time, my A1C went from 11, to 10.5 to 7. I looking forward to more declining numbers next month.  I remain a strict vegetarian...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      barry

       

      I'm the 'Barry' David mentioned in the article.  I looked at Barnard's book also. They say I'm type 1, but am not yet in need of insulin. I'd like to keep it that way! In 2 month's time, my A1C went from 11, to 10.5 to 7. I looking forward to more declining numbers next month.  I remain a strict vegetarian and mostly vegan. Like you, I also believe eating low glycemic is important but I prefer for now to eat low carbs and only good fats (for example, mono saturates like olive oil). I've lost 20 lbs. I feel better than I've felt in many years now. As I continue to learn more each day, I recognize now that two diabetics eating exactly the same food will have differing blood sugar response. We need not have to promote rules and diets for everyone, but to share and compare our experiences. Thanks for your comments. I'd also enjoy exchanging ideas with other veg head diabetics (1&2) who have discovered low carb protein options, what you look for (or look out for) when you go out to eat, and how your life has changed and been challenged by remaining vegetarian and eating to reduce systemic inflammation. I believe all of us vegetarian diabetics can benefit from networking together. Best health to you too! Sincerely, David's friend -Barry (feel free to contact me at: be at slsware dot com)

  • Anonymous
    Mark Whitcombe
    Feb. 25, 2008

    Very timely article, David -- yet another reason why I read your blog assiduously!

    I am a 57-year-old Type II diabetic (diagnosed just over a year ago, and within several months, under good control with A1C under 6.0). I’ve lost 22 kg, and am now in training to walk my second marathon, aiming at under 5 hours for the 42.2 km. My wife and I first switched...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Very timely article, David -- yet another reason why I read your blog assiduously!

    I am a 57-year-old Type II diabetic (diagnosed just over a year ago, and within several months, under good control with A1C under 6.0). I’ve lost 22 kg, and am now in training to walk my second marathon, aiming at under 5 hours for the 42.2 km. My wife and I first switched to a low glycemic diet, and I began serious walking in response to a challenge from a niece. We were gradually well on our way to a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. But I was increasingly concerned about post-prandial blood glucose swings based even on low glycemic but fairly high-carb intake. As a marathoner-in-training, race-walking above 50 km each week as well as swimming and weightlifting, I’m consuming about 3500 calories per day. That’s a lot of carbs given a low-fat diet. And those carbs meant higher post-prandials (in the 8s -- above 150 in American un than I was comfortable with.

    After reading here and elsewhere about Bernstein’s approach (and others, including Atkin’s and Rosedale), I have switched to a low-carb approach. Not as deeply low-carb as perhaps I should, though most days I’m eating about 80 gms carbs. That means that I’ve switched to a high-fat diet, and therefore so far, a high meat way of eating.

    But I’ve all along been wondering about how I would eat low on the food chain, and yet eat low carb. I certainly eat a lot of nuts. The main source of my beef is wonderful local organic stuff raised by a friend and fed only materials produced organically on his own farm. So I’ve been able to justify that particular meat because it’s got a much lighter ecological footprint than eating asparagus from Chile and blueberries from Argentina.

    But the ecological footprint of a Brazil nut is very troubling. I’m consuming and enjoying the fruit of a tree that can only grow in virgin rainforests ...

    This article of yours stimulates me to dig deeper and to see the overall ecological footprint of everything that I’m eating. I’m going to expand my home veggie garden. I’m going to do what I can to live the “100 Mile Diet” and thinking that will be easy in the summer and fall. 

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 25, 2008

      Dear Mark,

       

      Thank you for your contribution. It is precisely the heavy ecological footprint of eating food passed through the stomachs of livestock is moving me too in the direction of a vegetarian diet. I'm not there yet, but certainly when any of us eat less meat we are doing a bit to help prevent the further worsening of the health of our planet....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Mark,

       

      Thank you for your contribution. It is precisely the heavy ecological footprint of eating food passed through the stomachs of livestock is moving me too in the direction of a vegetarian diet. I'm not there yet, but certainly when any of us eat less meat we are doing a bit to help prevent the further worsening of the health of our planet. Besides, it's clear that like so many people, I was getting too much protein anyway.

       

      Your mention of Brazil nuts was an eye-opener for me. I have always loved them. They are also far higher in healthy selenium than any other food (although, as a recent issue of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter notes, the therapeutic dose of Brazil nuts becomes a toxic dose when you eat more than 5 a day). But that's as far as I had thought about them. I knew -- but had not considered -- that they all are harvested from virgin rainforest, making their carbon footprint somewhat equivalent to that of a cow.

       

      Last year I read "The 100-mile Diet" (titled "Plenty: One Man, One Woman, and a Raucous Year of Eating Locally" in the U.S. edition) and had the opportunity to go to a talk here by the authors. Interesting, but even more persuasive was Bill McKibben, who wrote "The Deep Economy" and who I also heard speak (and corresponded with) here. Among my articles that developed out of that interest was one at http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=158 

       

      I think that it is fitting that some of us with diabetes are taking the lead not only in reversing our own illness but also that of our environment! 

       

  • Anonymous
    Cleo
    Feb. 25, 2008
    I am also a vegetarian diabetic.  I also avoid gluten, which is compatible with eating low carb.  I am still in the process of discovering the best diet for myself, but I have a couple of suggestions for you.  Eating raw, is definitely the best way to keep the carbs low, and the insulin usage low.  Fortunately there are dozens of raw cookbooks...
    RHMLucky777
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    I am also a vegetarian diabetic.  I also avoid gluten, which is compatible with eating low carb.  I am still in the process of discovering the best diet for myself, but I have a couple of suggestions for you.  Eating raw, is definitely the best way to keep the carbs low, and the insulin usage low.  Fortunately there are dozens of raw cookbooks out now that illustrate the tastiness and creativity of raw food preparation.  I would be careful with seitan and other high gluten substitutes because gluten is difficult to digest and the overabundance of it in our culture makes people more likely to develop an allergy/sensitivity to it.  I use tempeh or tofu instead.  If you are sensitive to soy I would use some of the faux meats you can make with nuts, found in raw cookbooks.  I am not a total vegan, but use only goat milk products, and no eggs.  Purslane is also very high in omega-3 oils. Diabetes has helped me to become a better vegetarian, to eat mostly vegetables and fruits and less processed foods.
    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 25, 2008

      Dear Cleo,

       

      I appreciate your comments very much. You made some excellent points for all readers and I will pass them on directly to my friend Barry. Yesterday we were talking about seitan, in particular that the many people who are gluten-intollerant would not be able to eat it. I would like to know more, however, about your sources that indicate to you...

      RHMLucky777

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      Dear Cleo,

       

      I appreciate your comments very much. You made some excellent points for all readers and I will pass them on directly to my friend Barry. Yesterday we were talking about seitan, in particular that the many people who are gluten-intollerant would not be able to eat it. I would like to know more, however, about your sources that indicate to you that gluten is bad for everyone. Clearly, wheat flour is bad for all of us (because it is so high glycemic and high carb) so it is important to differentiate between them.

       

      Your suggestion about making faux meat from nuts is a most interesting one. But nuts are, of course, moderately higher in carbs than the leafy plants I recommended in my recent article here on "Good Veggies," so a low-carber would need to eat them in moderation.

       

      Your suggestion about purslane for omega-3 is a great one. I was able to find it regularly at the farmer's market when I lived in Santa Cruz, California. It is, of course, a common wild plant. But where are you able to get it? 

    • Anonymous
      Cleo
      Feb. 25, 2008

      I have read from more than one source that gluten intolerance is an under diagnosed problem, and that many people are sensitive to it but aren't aware.

      One doctor who writes about the difficulity in digesting gluten protein is Susan Lark who has a website and a health newsletter.   

      I grow my own purslane in the summertime, and can also buy it at...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      I have read from more than one source that gluten intolerance is an under diagnosed problem, and that many people are sensitive to it but aren't aware.

      One doctor who writes about the difficulity in digesting gluten protein is Susan Lark who has a website and a health newsletter.   

      I grow my own purslane in the summertime, and can also buy it at the farmer's market here in Madison (Wi.). 

       

       

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Feb. 25, 2008

      Dear Cleo,

       

      What you write -- that gluten intolerance is under-diagnosed -- corresponds exactly what the founder of the BalancePoint Health program (http://www.balancepointhealth.com/) told me at lunch today. He said that officially 1 out of every 130 of us is gluten intolerant, but that actually more of us are. Certainly, however, most of us aren't....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Cleo,

       

      What you write -- that gluten intolerance is under-diagnosed -- corresponds exactly what the founder of the BalancePoint Health program (http://www.balancepointhealth.com/) told me at lunch today. He said that officially 1 out of every 130 of us is gluten intolerant, but that actually more of us are. Certainly, however, most of us aren't. What he didn't tell me -- and I wish I knew how to determine -- is how any of us can know for ourselves.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David