Living With

Overcoming Exercise Inertia

David Mendosa Health Guide April 03, 2008
  • Starting to exercise isn't easy for anyone. It sure wasn't for me, even though I knew all too well how important exercise is for controlling my diabetes. It's a particularly personal example of the universal problem called inertia, which Sir Isaac Newton told us about 321 years ago in ...

3 Comments
  • songbird
    Apr. 08, 2008

    Dear David,

    I really enjoy reading your column. Your journals help keep me on track! One woman mentioned she was waiting to buy on iPod so she could listen to recorded books and music as she walked. I, too, once waited to buy one. They are expensive. But then I found the Creative Zen Nano Plus. It's a tiny mp3 device. It's easy to download books or music...

    RHMLucky777

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    Dear David,

    I really enjoy reading your column. Your journals help keep me on track! One woman mentioned she was waiting to buy on iPod so she could listen to recorded books and music as she walked. I, too, once waited to buy one. They are expensive. But then I found the Creative Zen Nano Plus. It's a tiny mp3 device. It's easy to download books or music with it's own software. I can use a rechargable AAA battery or regular AAA battery. The ear buds that come with it are comfortable to wear--and best of all it costs less than $100. Listening to books on mp3, which I download from my local public library's Internet site for free, have kept me walking, losing weight, and keeping by blood glucose numbers down. I know you like to compare useful items for diabetics--so you might want to compare mp3's--they are really great tools for all of us! Thanks

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Apr. 08, 2008

      Dear Songbird,

       

      Many thanks for your comments. This is excellent advice. What I really liked about them is your recommendation to use the free resources of your local public library. It's amazing to me how few people make use of what their libraries offer. My library here in Boulder, Colorado (population only about 100,000) has more than 3,000 books...

      RHMLucky777

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      Dear Songbird,

       

      Many thanks for your comments. This is excellent advice. What I really liked about them is your recommendation to use the free resources of your local public library. It's amazing to me how few people make use of what their libraries offer. My library here in Boulder, Colorado (population only about 100,000) has more than 3,000 books on CD -- all of which can be copied to my iPod.

       

      Thank you for the compliment that I could compare mp3 players. That's better done by people like David Pogue of the New York Times. Personally, I am too commited to iPods to be objective! I have had three of them (a Shuffle, a Nano, and now an iPod Touch, which is an iPhone without the phone). Actually, if I remember correctly a Shuffle costs only about $75 and will easily handle a book on CD.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David 

  • Katwink
    Apr. 04, 2008

    I've been walking regularly since my Type 2 diagnosis a year ago. I've lost 30 pounds but most important is what I've learned along the way.

     

    First, I need a walking partner or another motivator to keep me going. When I started back to college (after a 20 year break), there were days I couldn't meet up with my friend to walk and chat. I...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I've been walking regularly since my Type 2 diagnosis a year ago. I've lost 30 pounds but most important is what I've learned along the way.

     

    First, I need a walking partner or another motivator to keep me going. When I started back to college (after a 20 year break), there were days I couldn't meet up with my friend to walk and chat. I found that if I got off the bus before the closest stop to campus, or parked in the farthest (and cheapest) lot, I didn't resist walking. I have a hard time making myself walk around the campus or in my neighborhood just for exercise.

     

    Second, it is still a struggle to make time for myself and I haven't experienced the shift in attitude that David has. Exercise is only special for me when I can spend time with friends or spouse. What I learned is that this will take longer for my attitude to shift and it's not fair to compare myself to anyone else's progress.

     

    Last, I need small rewards and something really big to look forward toas motivation. I take time to read a chapter of fiction on days I walk but I also set up something fun every month or so. A theater event, comedy night, art walk, etc. gives me something to look forward to that doesn't necessarily involve food (I also have celiac disease and shellfish allergies). Picturing the fun evening gets me through sometimes odious exercise and overwhelming studies.