Living With

Diabetes Diet: No Need for Carbohydrates, Best Protein Sources, Good Fats & Fiber

David Mendosa Health Guide May 29, 2008
  • If you are a big person who would like to get smaller, the "Diet for a Small Person" is for you. It's the updated and micro version of Frances Moore Lappé's 1971 best-seller, "Diet for a Small Planet."That book introduced the concept of complementary protein. While she pushed the idea too far,...

13 Comments
  • emma
    Apr. 04, 2011

    thankyou for the reasearch that u have made 

    well we have a assignment due in the school and its about diabtes and cardiovascular disease i just want to know how if effect a persons lifestyle not the foods but how can u please reply for this in the last few minuites thanks or before friday 8.4.11 

    thanks 

    regards 

    someone who is random....................!!!!!!!...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    thankyou for the reasearch that u have made 

    well we have a assignment due in the school and its about diabtes and cardiovascular disease i just want to know how if effect a persons lifestyle not the foods but how can u please reply for this in the last few minuites thanks or before friday 8.4.11 

    thanks 

    regards 

    someone who is random....................!!!!!!!

  • verdungal
    Jul. 18, 2009

    David

    On July 14th, I posted an article How Healthy is Your Veggie Burger?

     

    Much of the "natural" soy protein used in foods today is bathed in a toxic, explosive chemical solvent known as hexane

     

    Before printed the article I checked out the following site.

     www.nowpublic.com/.../neurotoxic-pollutant-hexane-used-leading-natural-soy-brands

     ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    David

    On July 14th, I posted an article How Healthy is Your Veggie Burger?

     

    Much of the "natural" soy protein used in foods today is bathed in a toxic, explosive chemical solvent known as hexane

     

    Before printed the article I checked out the following site.

     www.nowpublic.com/.../neurotoxic-pollutant-hexane-used-leading-natural-soy-brands

     

    Which states in part , : "The Cornucopia Institute report

     

    "Part I of the comprehensive report explores the reasons for asking these questions, including why organic consumers should be wary of Chinese imports, given the lax oversight by the USDA over organic certifiers working in China."

    "GardeinTM is a Canadian company that produces meat analogs - soy-based "chicken" and soy-based "beef" - for popular brands and private labels. While the company describe its process for making these meat analogs as "pure and simple," it does not mention that it starts with hexane-extracted soy protein.""

     

    I further checked out www.gardein.com. Click on Products USA

    You will find Kellogg's Morning Star Farms products.

    Joan

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Jul. 18, 2009

      Dear Joan,

       

      Your message disturbs me and should also disturb all of those people who follow a vegetarian diet. Thank you for sending it.

       

      First, please let us know where you write your articles.

       

      Second, I found the nowpublic.com link that you send, although it was bad. The correct link is http://www.nowpublic.com/health/neurotoxic-pollutant-hexane-used-leading-natural-soy-brands...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Joan,

       

      Your message disturbs me and should also disturb all of those people who follow a vegetarian diet. Thank you for sending it.

       

      First, please let us know where you write your articles.

       

      Second, I found the nowpublic.com link that you send, although it was bad. The correct link is http://www.nowpublic.com/health/neurotoxic-pollutant-hexane-used-leading-natural-soy-brands .

       

      Third, I was particularly disturbed because I had been thinking of adding soy protein to my morning breakfast of GreensFirst (http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/17/67280/drink-veggies ). I've experimented with whey protein, but whey may be inflammatory, according to some preliminary research by BalancePoint Health. I've tried rice protein, but don't particularly like the taste. Egg white protein mixes quite poorly. So I was planning to use soy protein -- until I read your message.

       

      I eat few soy-based products now. Up until about a year ago I used to enjoy MorningStar Farms Breakfast Patties Made with Organic Soy. But they contain wheat gluten to which I have been tested as sensitive and which aren't good for millions of us (far more than the number of people who know that they have celiac disease).

       

      So I will stick with egg white protein after all. It does have the great advantage of having perhaps the most complete -- most perfect -- protein there is.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

    • verdungal
      Jul. 18, 2009

      Hi David

      I write my articles on my sharepost under the name verdungal.   How Healthy is Your Veggie Burger was posted  July 14th

      Regards

      Joan 

  • itfitz
    Jun. 04, 2008

    David:

     

    You mention that Brazil nuts are among your recommended 3 nuts (along with almonds and macadamia nuts), but you discouraged cashew consumption because of their high carbohydrate count.

     

    I've avoided Brazil nuts for years due to their extra-high saturated fat content (along with macadamia nuts).

    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3091/2...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    David:

     

    You mention that Brazil nuts are among your recommended 3 nuts (along with almonds and macadamia nuts), but you discouraged cashew consumption because of their high carbohydrate count.

     

    I've avoided Brazil nuts for years due to their extra-high saturated fat content (along with macadamia nuts).

    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3091/2

     

    Nuts are my favorite snack, and I make a mix of almonds, hazelnuts (filberts), pecans and pistachios.  Pecans are particularly low in carbs.  (I may eliminate or reduce my pistachio consumption after reading their carb content!)

     

    What are your thoughts on eating Brazil nuts and macadamia nuts, especially considering their high levels of saturated fat?  And what do you think about pecans & hazelnuts?

     

    Thanks as always for a phenomenal column!


    Kevin

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Jun. 04, 2008

      Dear Kevin,

       

      Thanks for writing. Pecans and hazelnuts are certainly fine, although I don't eat them much, just because I'm not as crazy about them as I am about almonds, macadamias, and Brazil nuts.

       

      But macadamias are very LOW in saturated fat. I remember that at least 10 years ago I investigated the fat profile of nuts, and macadamias were very...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Kevin,

       

      Thanks for writing. Pecans and hazelnuts are certainly fine, although I don't eat them much, just because I'm not as crazy about them as I am about almonds, macadamias, and Brazil nuts.

       

      But macadamias are very LOW in saturated fat. I remember that at least 10 years ago I investigated the fat profile of nuts, and macadamias were very good.

       

      The USDA site (the gold standard) says that of every 100 grams of these nuts, macadamias have 12 grams of saturated fat. Brazils have 15. Almonds are very low at 3.

       

      Besides, what's wrong with saturated fat? Gary Taubes certainly exposed the myth that saturated fat is bad for us in his ground-breaking book, Good Calories, Bad Calories.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

  • Dee
    Dee
    Jun. 02, 2008

    My daughter, my husband, and myself have been on low carb for insulin resistant diabetes for quite some time.  It works wonders of course, since we are not eating things that raise our blood sugars, we are clinically non-diabetic with no meds.

    However, my daughter has expressed some concerns because she read that protein causes as much of an insulin release...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    My daughter, my husband, and myself have been on low carb for insulin resistant diabetes for quite some time.  It works wonders of course, since we are not eating things that raise our blood sugars, we are clinically non-diabetic with no meds.

    However, my daughter has expressed some concerns because she read that protein causes as much of an insulin release as carbs, but doesn't affect blood sugar, b/c at the same time, the liver releases an enzyme that deactivates the insulin.

    Now she's concerned that eating low carb will tire out her beta cells, just as though she was eating high carb.

    Can you shed any light on this? 

    Best,

    Dee Sperling

    Central Square, NY

  • Anonymous
    M some
    May. 31, 2008

    I started a low carb diet (4 corner) to stabilize my blood sugars.  It seems to be working.  Thank you for your comments on this diet.  It encouraged me to begin it and I'm shocked to find that I'm not craving my favorite breads.

    I can't find a mention of legumes like lentils in the book.  I thought that they were low carb along with soybeans. ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I started a low carb diet (4 corner) to stabilize my blood sugars.  It seems to be working.  Thank you for your comments on this diet.  It encouraged me to begin it and I'm shocked to find that I'm not craving my favorite breads.

    I can't find a mention of legumes like lentils in the book.  I thought that they were low carb along with soybeans.  Is trhat not the case?  Do you know if a link to info re lentils and other related foods?

    Thank

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      May. 31, 2008

      The only beans or lentils that I have discovered to be low-carb are the black soy beans that I mentioned. You can check specific ones yourself. If they are in a can, the nutrition facts will of course be on the label. If raw, you can check them on the USDA site at http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

       

      David

  • verdungal
    May. 30, 2008

    Hi David:

    Kim Chi is a food  I have never heard of , and thought I would share my findings.

     

    Kim Chi while being low in calories. One serving also provides up to 80% of the daily required amount of Vitamin C and carotene. . Most types of kimchi contain onions, garlic and peppers all of which are salutary. The vegetables being made into kimchi...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi David:

    Kim Chi is a food  I have never heard of , and thought I would share my findings.

     

    Kim Chi while being low in calories. One serving also provides up to 80% of the daily required amount of Vitamin C and carotene. . Most types of kimchi contain onions, garlic and peppers all of which are salutary. The vegetables being made into kimchi also contribute to the overall nutritional value. Kimchi is rich in vitamin A, thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), calcium and iron, and contains a number of lactic acid bacteria . In 2000, a novel bacteriocin -producing lactic acid bacterium (strain MT-1077T) was isolated from Kimchi and was named Lactobacillus kimchi.

     

    Kimchi has a reputation of being a healthy food . The US magazineHealth named kimchi in its list of top five "World's Healthiest Foods" for being rich in vitamins, aiding digestion, and even possibly retarding cancer growth. However, some research focused on high-sodium dietary dependence has found overconsumption of kimchi and soybean paste ( hangul: similar to miso ) to be alliums and unfermented seafood were found to be protective factors. One oncological study found one type of kimchi to be a protective factor against gastric cancer while two other types of such high-sodium kimchi as dongchimi (hangul: ) were risk factors.

     

    Kim Chi being very high in sodium,  I made a Google query and found a  source  made without salt which might be worth checking out is
    http://www.rejuvenative.com/catalog_sfgk

    It is made from fresh, shredded, unheated vegetables which are put into stainless steel containers and left to culture for five to seven days. No water or vinegar is added. These delicious, high-fiber, low-fat, unheated, organic, cultured vegetables are one of the richest sources of lactobacilli and enzymes available. Lactobacilli are probiotic microflora, naturally implanted by mother's milk, normally present in a healthy human digestive tract.

     

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      May. 30, 2008

      Dear Joan,

       

      Thank you for your research and for finding the Rejuvenative Foods brand of low-sodium kim-chee. It is that brand of kim-chee that I eat, and in fact just had some for dinner. But I haven't been able to find the low-sodium variety here. You have inspired me to keep looking!

       

      David

    • Anonymous
      Earlene
      Jun. 02, 2008

      Many fermented foods may be grown at home. There are many websites with directions. Fermented foods were all home made in the begining and were usually lactic acid fermentation with no salt. There are ways to make kim chee using the whey left behind from straining yoghurt and only adding salt to taste. A few years ago I bought five dollars worth of kefir grains...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Many fermented foods may be grown at home. There are many websites with directions. Fermented foods were all home made in the begining and were usually lactic acid fermentation with no salt. There are ways to make kim chee using the whey left behind from straining yoghurt and only adding salt to taste. A few years ago I bought five dollars worth of kefir grains and was in heaven for a short while. When they are happy they are like tribills(sp?). I could not use enough kefir to maintain the number of grains that grew. I had to put some of them down( I won't say where) and felt like I was destroying a pet. It was the best kefir I ever had.

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Jun. 02, 2008

      Dear Earlene,

       

      Thanks for this contribution. A friend of mine makes the most wonderful sauerkraut at home by following the directions posted online by the owner of Rejuvenative Foods -- which sells their raw sauerkraut for a lot of money. And the homemade is much better. Now all I need is time....

       

      Best regards,

       

      David