The Sleep Apnea-Diabetes Connection

David Mendosa Health Guide January 31, 2007
  • People who have diabetes and those who have sleep apnea have several things in common. There’s no cure for either condition, but both can be controlled.The connection is even closer. About 40 percent of all men who have type 2 diabetes also have sleep apnea, according to research that Daniel Einh...

9 Comments
  • Anonymous
    Phil
    May. 16, 2010

    Hello and thanks for the info.  I need to know if you are diabetic the possibilities of developing Sleep Apnea.  Or if you have Sleep Apnea the possibilities of developing diabetes.  I have both.  I'm not real sure which came first.  It seems like the diabetes and the the sleep apnea.  both are uncontrolled.  Please help.

    ...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More

    Hello and thanks for the info.  I need to know if you are diabetic the possibilities of developing Sleep Apnea.  Or if you have Sleep Apnea the possibilities of developing diabetes.  I have both.  I'm not real sure which came first.  It seems like the diabetes and the the sleep apnea.  both are uncontrolled.  Please help.

     

    Phil

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      May. 16, 2010

      Dear Phil,

       

      You need to control both your diabetes and your sleep apnea. Actually, controlling either one will help control the other. The key to controling diabetes is to move more and eat less, meaning to loose weight. That will help you control your sleep apnea too. Meanwhile, you have to see a doctor who is a sleep specialist to test you and prescribe...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Phil,

       

      You need to control both your diabetes and your sleep apnea. Actually, controlling either one will help control the other. The key to controling diabetes is to move more and eat less, meaning to loose weight. That will help you control your sleep apnea too. Meanwhile, you have to see a doctor who is a sleep specialist to test you and prescribe a CPAP machine. That could save your life.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Jul. 14, 2009

    Hi!

     

    I hope this will help someone. My husband, an otherwise healthy and accomplished gentleman, at the top of his profession, was finally diagnosed at age 32 with sleep apnea. Now, at age 49, he has diabetes.

     

    He totally now works out, and because he is so accomplished, he still finds it hard just to SLEEP  when he needs to sleep. This is...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi!

     

    I hope this will help someone. My husband, an otherwise healthy and accomplished gentleman, at the top of his profession, was finally diagnosed at age 32 with sleep apnea. Now, at age 49, he has diabetes.

     

    He totally now works out, and because he is so accomplished, he still finds it hard just to SLEEP  when he needs to sleep. This is a daily struggle, but life in Western Society is so focused on achieving, achieving, achieving. He does achieve, but now his health, eating well, resting well and exercising are the first priorities, because everything else is 2nd after your health. He has been sleeping well with his CPAP machine, but travel is a particular challenge, especially on long air flights, etc. But he is completely dependent upon the machine, and loves to sleep.

     

    We invested in the most comfortable bed, exquisite sheets and comforters, lots of pillows, and we have NO phones, NO computers, NO tvs in any of the bedrooms. Bedrooms are for sleeping. Or relaxing activities before sleeping. Conversation, reading, etc. ...and yes, of course sex!

     

    I am scared for him, but we have also taken out extra insurance so that our minor children would be seen about in case....

     

    But, the biggest challenge has not been anything other than encouranging him to REST when he feels tired. He feels guilty because of the WASPY constraints of society, and of course, when you call an executive in the middle of the day, you can not say he is napping. (Only the GREAT country of Spain gets how important and right the siesta is).

     

    So the 80/20 diet helps (80% fresh fruit, veggies, salad, and only 20% of any and everything else) .....but sleep is everything. We figured one time that because he had had this sleep apnea condition his whole life, and was diagnosed at age 32, with normal sleep of about 8 hours, he would still require at least 2 additonal hours of sleep per day until age 70 to make up his sleep debt.

     

    I hope this helps someone else.....sleep is everything with both of these, and if he is tired, he does not do well on his diet, but conversely if he is well rested, it is easier to exercise, eat well, and of course, if you feel well, you enjoy EVERYTHING more!

     

    Hope this helps!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Jul. 14, 2009

    Hi!

     

    I hope this will help someone. My husband, an otherwise healthy and accomplished gentleman, at the top of his profession, was finally diagnosed at age 32 with sleep apnea. Now, at age 49, he has diabetes.

     

    He totally now works out, and because he is so accomplished, he still finds it hard just to SLEEP  when he needs to sleep. This is...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi!

     

    I hope this will help someone. My husband, an otherwise healthy and accomplished gentleman, at the top of his profession, was finally diagnosed at age 32 with sleep apnea. Now, at age 49, he has diabetes.

     

    He totally now works out, and because he is so accomplished, he still finds it hard just to SLEEP  when he needs to sleep. This is a daily struggle, but life in Western Society is so focused on achieving, achieving, achieving. He does achieve, but now his health, eating well, resting well and exercising are the first priorities, because everything else is 2nd after your health.

     

    I am scared for him, but we have also taken out extra insurance so that our minor children would be seen about in case....

     

    But, the biggest challenge has not been anything other than encouranging him to REST when he feels tired. He feels guilty because of the WASPY constraints of society, and of course, when you call an executive in the middle of the day, you can not say he is napping. (Only the GREAT country of Spain gets how important and right the siesta is).

     

    So the 80/20 diet helps (80% fresh fruit, veggies, salad, and only 20% of any and everything else) .....but sleep is everything. We figured one time that because he had had this sleep apnea condition his whole life, and was diagnosed at age 32, with normal sleep of about 8 hours, he would still require at least 2 additonal hours of sleep per day until age 70 to make up his sleep debt.

     

    I hope this helps someone else.....sleep is everything with both of these, and if he is tired, he does not do well on his diet, but conversely if he is well rested, it is easier to exercise, eat well, and of course, if you feel well, you enjoy EVERYTHING more!

     

    Hope this helps!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Anonymous
    Penny
    Jun. 25, 2009

    I wish there were more points made that explain how the stress that untreated sleep apnea causes on the body and how it gives rise to the blood sugar.

  • Anonymous
    Jim
    Jan. 15, 2009

    I have both sleep apnea and diabetes. I found out yesterday (Jan. 14) that There is a direct connection in that the body almost shuts down in sleep apnea and this affects the whole system, not just oxygen flow to the brain

     

    Granted my case was severe (oxygen to the brain dropped to 60% and I stopped breathing 69 times in an hour in the sleep study).

     ...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I have both sleep apnea and diabetes. I found out yesterday (Jan. 14) that There is a direct connection in that the body almost shuts down in sleep apnea and this affects the whole system, not just oxygen flow to the brain

     

    Granted my case was severe (oxygen to the brain dropped to 60% and I stopped breathing 69 times in an hour in the sleep study).

     

    I would very much like to hear your input on this connection.

     

    Jim

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Jan. 15, 2009

      Dear Jim,

       

      Yes, sleep apnea can be deadly. I was afraid that I would fall asleep at the wheel, particularly when I drove in the afternoon or evening. But it can kill you more directly, as you say.

       

      Don't mess around with anything else besides a CPAP machine. Eventually, you may be able to cure sleep apnea. I know, because after I was able to cut...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Dear Jim,

       

      Yes, sleep apnea can be deadly. I was afraid that I would fall asleep at the wheel, particularly when I drove in the afternoon or evening. But it can kill you more directly, as you say.

       

      Don't mess around with anything else besides a CPAP machine. Eventually, you may be able to cure sleep apnea. I know, because after I was able to cut my weight in half (literally) I did. But that took years. In the meantime nothing but a CPAP machine will do it for you. AND all CPAP machines are not created equal. I had to learn that the hard way. Please review my articles on sleep apnea here.

       

      Best regards,

       

      David

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Jul. 14, 2009

      i posted and hope you can read it, but sleep is everything.

       

      It si a double whammy, but you must sleep and you must eat well (80% fresh fruits and veggies, 20% everything else)....but sleeping is key.

       

      And give yourself time. When my husband first got diagnosed and had a machine, he had NEVER had a good night sleep in 32 years!!! Then he slept pretty...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      i posted and hope you can read it, but sleep is everything.

       

      It si a double whammy, but you must sleep and you must eat well (80% fresh fruits and veggies, 20% everything else)....but sleeping is key.

       

      And give yourself time. When my husband first got diagnosed and had a machine, he had NEVER had a good night sleep in 32 years!!! Then he slept pretty solidly for 6 weeks, as much as 20 hours per day.....and he would just get up to eat, and exercise, then sleep.

       

      He was very fortunate in that when at age 49 he was diagnosed with diabetes, the company he worked for gave him 2 months off just to deal with the shock and then the adjustments. No more going on pure adrenaline and coffee and cigarettes til 3 in the afternoon!

       

      He is in high volume international sales, and now, the first thing he does is eat a sensible breakfast, exercise, and then work, and then more exercise and a nap. Spain is the best and most sensible country about this!!!

       

      And don't feel guilty! Do what is right for your body, and mind, and the rest follows....

  • Anonymous
    Meridith
    Feb. 01, 2007
    David, Got an severe sleep apnea diagnosis in the early 90s. Have used CPAP for 10+ years. Type 2 diabetes diagnosis in 2001. Hope you also discuss the cardiac complications which are well known results of untreated apnea as well as diabetes. Use cpap daily and am enormously grateful for roommate who told me that I sounded like a small plane in a stall. Thanks!