Mirrors for Our Feet

David Mendosa Health Guide November 19, 2008
  • We have been using mirrors for at least 8,000 years to check our appearance and to admire our features. But only now can we conveniently use them to check the health of our feet. The newest development in this long history of mirrors can help those of us who have diabetes prevent the worst problems ...

8 Comments
  • laurenceturner
    Nov. 05, 2010

    Hi

    We looked at the insight scales with intrest and would like to to ask a few questions to Jack Guest.

    We are involved with the podiatry dept at the NHS in England.

    He can send me his contact details at laurenceturner@fsmail.net

     

    Regards

    Laurence

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Nov. 05, 2010

      You can email him at Jack Guest <jack@arcadiagp.com>

       

      David

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Dec. 01, 2008

    I'm not sure that I'm impressed with this product. Many people (myself included) don't weigh ourselves every day, and yet we should check our feet daily. And, in your words, you find it easiest to use the mirror when you're sitting down. Many diabetics don't have the vision to read numbers five feet from their eyes or can't see past their bellies. It costs...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I'm not sure that I'm impressed with this product. Many people (myself included) don't weigh ourselves every day, and yet we should check our feet daily. And, in your words, you find it easiest to use the mirror when you're sitting down. Many diabetics don't have the vision to read numbers five feet from their eyes or can't see past their bellies. It costs a hundred bucks, and you can buy a mirror on a collapsible rod that's made for this purpose for about $10 and it doesn't take up floor room in a bathroom.

    • Anonymous
      Jack Guest
      Feb. 13, 2009

      Hello,

      I'm the guy (Jack Guest) that David quoted in the article above - so obviously a bit biased.  I appreciate all of your feedback and wanted to clarify a few things.  All of your concerns are directly on point and were things that we have done our best to take into consideration.  We actually wouldn't recommend that anyone weigh themselves...

      RHMLucky777

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      Hello,

      I'm the guy (Jack Guest) that David quoted in the article above - so obviously a bit biased.  I appreciate all of your feedback and wanted to clarify a few things.  All of your concerns are directly on point and were things that we have done our best to take into consideration.  We actually wouldn't recommend that anyone weigh themselves everyday, especially if you are trying to lose any weight as the daily fluctuations can be discouraging.  The act of checking your feet is done separately (best if sitting down on the toilet seat) from the weight measurement, so really having the scale out just serves as a good reminder to check your feet everyday - no need to weigh all the time.  We understand that people with diabetes are at increased risk of having impaired eyesight.  This is why we have the LED lights around the mirror to light up the image of the bottom of your foot as well as why the mirrors are concave which produces a magnified image.  We also tried to make the numbers in the weight reading as big as possible since you're eyes will be further away when standing on the scale than they are when you are sitting down looking at your feet.

       

      With regards to the telescoping rod and mirror, it is certainly true that you can get these at a very low price.  Some people opt for just putting a mirror on the floor as well (though that can be a bit dangerous).  These products have been around for a long time and we knew of them when coming up with the idea for our product.  In talking to health care professionals and consumers, we found that these tools are often used for a while, but then confined to a drawer somewhere in the house not to be seen for quite some time.  Our hope is that our scale looks nice enough so that people are willing to display it in their bathroom.  Seeing it all the time will (we hope) get them into the habit of checking their feet everyday.  Not too many of the telescoping rods have lights and none that I know of have a mirror that magnifies the image either.  So if you'll remember to use it everyday and have good enough eyesight that you don't need a magnified image then I'd actually say to save the cash and use one of those products.  In fact, we may introduce one into our brand for people to bring along when traveling in the future.

       

      That was more long winded that I had planned...haha.  If you have any other questions or comments though, please feel free to email me (jack at arcadiagp dot com).  I actually live over in Asia making sure that we get the highest quality product possible and I'm always looking for ways to improve our scale!

  • Anonymous
    achy legs
    Nov. 20, 2008

    You said: "The most common type is peripheral neuropathy, which causes pain or loss of feeling in the toes, feet, legs, hands, and arms."

    I'm often woken up by achy sometimes crampy legs in the wee hours. doc has no clue as to why. Could this be early signs of neuropathy? If so, what should I do?

    • David Mendosa
      Health Guide
      Nov. 21, 2008

      I don't think that your leg cramps are an early sign of neuropathy. The Mayo Clinic has an excellent discussion at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/night-leg-cramps/AN00499


      They mention potassium (and a lot of other things well worth reading). Others whom I don't respect as much as the Mayo Clinic mention two other minerals in addition to potassium -- magnesium...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      I don't think that your leg cramps are an early sign of neuropathy. The Mayo Clinic has an excellent discussion at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/night-leg-cramps/AN00499


      They mention potassium (and a lot of other things well worth reading). Others whom I don't respect as much as the Mayo Clinic mention two other minerals in addition to potassium -- magnesium and calcium. I do know that people with diabetes are usually deficient in magnesium. So that might give you two reasons to increase the amount that you take. Please see my article about magnesium at http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/17/1672/magnesium-diabetes/

       

      David

    • Anonymous
      achy legs
      Nov. 21, 2008

      Thank you,

      those links are both interesting.

      I've had a few leg cramps in the past and know about them.

      However, the cramping is minor compared to the achiness which is what wakes me. the cramps then come into it after I'm woken up by the achiness - if I don't hold my toes up in the anti-cramp pull toward the knees.

      In my multi-vit and calc-magnesium supplements...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Thank you,

      those links are both interesting.

      I've had a few leg cramps in the past and know about them.

      However, the cramping is minor compared to the achiness which is what wakes me. the cramps then come into it after I'm woken up by the achiness - if I don't hold my toes up in the anti-cramp pull toward the knees.

      In my multi-vit and calc-magnesium supplements I get at least 500 mg per day of magnesium and at least 1500 mg calcium. I eat a lot of bananas for potassium and some grapes and brocolli too. I also eat chia seeds like I know you also suggest, in hopes of keeping from having too many nutritional holes.

      The achy legs in the wee hours is something new recently. That's why I wondered.

       

    • Anonymous
      Mona
      Dec. 03, 2012

      I agree with, I get cramping in my feet and when I started taking magnesium and potassium, it stopped. When my feet are cramping, I also have problems with my food going through my intestines to the point that I ended up in the hospital with a small intestine blockage. I still don't know what is causing this but it seems to act up when I'm under severe stress....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      I agree with, I get cramping in my feet and when I started taking magnesium and potassium, it stopped. When my feet are cramping, I also have problems with my food going through my intestines to the point that I ended up in the hospital with a small intestine blockage. I still don't know what is causing this but it seems to act up when I'm under severe stress.