Neuropathy and BG control

Gretchen Becker Health Guide May 14, 2012
  • Researchers have reported that a compound formed when blood glucose (BG) levels are high, called methylglyoxal, causes neuropathy. They say they are working on ways to reduce the levels of methylglyoxal.   This would certainly be nice. But what is really sad when one reads a summary of the art...

2 Comments
  • Anonymous
    Michael Barker
    May. 15, 2012

    I thought about neuropathy on Mother’s day while everyone ate cookies, ice cream and cake, virtually everyone, except me, was either overweight or obese. I didn’t have any of it; it wasn’t even tempting because I have neuropathy. My A1c goes between 4.8 and 5.2 and I’m a fairly new diabetic.

     

    Unlike most diabetics, I can feel the...

    RHMLucky777

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    I thought about neuropathy on Mother’s day while everyone ate cookies, ice cream and cake, virtually everyone, except me, was either overweight or obese. I didn’t have any of it; it wasn’t even tempting because I have neuropathy. My A1c goes between 4.8 and 5.2 and I’m a fairly new diabetic.

     

    Unlike most diabetics, I can feel the effects of even modest rises in my blood sugar. Mild tingling in the tips of my toes and fingers, itching and sharp pin pricks are my symptoms. To say the least, it isn’t a good feeling so it makes me avoid foods that cause that.

     

    I’ve talked with other diabetics and they say they don’t feel a thing. It’s my belief that the neuropathy has advanced far enough so that these nerve endings are now silent and that this silence permits people to go about their business.

    I tell them about a time when I was once swarmed by a nest of hornets and I didn’t find the stings to be worse than when my blood sugar got out of balance. They all say they would never touch a piece of cake if it made them feel like that, I suppose that’s my point.

     

    Diabetes comes on slowly and I’ve come to believe that one of the first things to go are the warning signs generated by the peripheral nerves.

     

    Monday night is drinks with the boy, which screws with my blood sugar. Tuesday morning I get to pay for it with the feeling of ants crawling on my skin.

    • Gretchen Becker
      Health Guide
      May. 15, 2012

      Michael, I agree with you that some kinds of diabetes come on slowly and many patients already have neuropathy when diagnosed. Some are able to reverse it with normal blood glucose levels. Some find that in doing so, the neuropathy first seems to be getting worse, because some of the nerves were deadened and are waking up again. But eventually it gets better....

      RHMLucky777

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      Michael, I agree with you that some kinds of diabetes come on slowly and many patients already have neuropathy when diagnosed. Some are able to reverse it with normal blood glucose levels. Some find that in doing so, the neuropathy first seems to be getting worse, because some of the nerves were deadened and are waking up again. But eventually it gets better.

       

      I know you have an uncommon form of diabetes, and I don't know how this would affect neuropathy. The A1c reflects only averages, and a lot of highs balanced with a lot of lows can give a normal A1c. But if you feel tingling when you go high, you're not apt to go high a lot, I'm sure.

       

      I'm sorry you're having to deal with this problem.