depression

Dealing With Diabetes: Diabetic Anxiety

Dr. Frank Varon Health Pro December 19, 2007
  • A crisis poses different meanings for people. Some of this has to do with our upbringing and our genetics and the environment plays a major role. Understanding how a crisis might affect one person or another might be similar to assessing pain in a patient.

     

    Definitions of the word "crisis" as found in the Merriam-Webster dictionary are:

    • the turning point for better or worse in an acute disease or fever;
    • a paroxysmal attack of pain, distress, or disordered function;
    • an emotionally significant event or radical change of status in a person's life (a midlife crisis);
    • the decisive moment (as in a literary plot);
    • an unstable or crucial time or state of affairs in which a decisive change is impending; especially : one with the distinct possibility of a highly undesirable outcome (a financial crisis);
    • a situation that has reached a critical phase (the environmental crisis)

    After you read that definition, if you do not have diabetes, this might not be an issue day-in or day-out. However, people with diabetes are continuously having to deal with a crisis when it comes to managing their own disease. One can understand why diabetes patients just get worn down and quit dealing with their disease management.

     

    We all will have a crisis at some point; how we deal with it is equally important. In some instances, patients may develop depression or anxiety disorders. It is critical that you develop a social support network, either with a loved one or friend, or engage in online chat discussions.

     

    The holidays seem to be particularly a tough time for many patients with chronic diseases. Healthcentral has two important websites that you should familiarize yourself with during this holiday time. These are www.anxietyconnection.com and www.mydepressionconnection.com . Both provide resources for you to do an emotional self-assessment and learn about treatment options. The important issue is to recognize that you might have a problem, and you should not be afraid to admit that there is one, and seek the resources to assist you improve your emotional health. Providing for your emotional health will ultimately help you manage your diabetes.