• flybye flybye
    November 10, 2009
    How do you lower your A1C level fast?
    flybye flybye
    November 10, 2009

    Hello, my A1C is at 7.2 at present.  What can I do in the short-term to lower this to 6.5 or lower?

    READ MORE

FROM OUR EXPERTS

  • Amy Tudor
    Health Guide
    July 15, 2014
    Amy Tudor
    Health Guide
    July 15, 2014

    Hi there, flybye -

    A doctor is always going to be your best source of advice on dealing with your diabetes, so you should check with him/her about the safest ways to lower your A1C levels.  However, I can tell you that there are some dietary changes you can make that can really help you with this. Cutting your consumption of fatty foods, carbs, and high-calorie foods will lower A1C levels, for example.  You should also try to avoid eating such foods and white flour, potatoes, rice, and noodles, as well as sugary foods such as ice cream.  Fried foods and lunch meats also boosts A1C levels.

    Here are some other links that you might find helpful:  

    Teaching Type 2 Diabetes Patients Decreases Hemoglobin A1C Levels

    American Diabetes Association Convention Day 2: A1C Levels

    Best of luck to you!

     

     


FROM OUR COMMUNITY

  • Massagemaniac November 11, 2009
    Massagemaniac
    November 11, 2009

     

    One more quick thing.   If you can afford it, buy an extra pack of test strips, and start testing after your meals --- change it up -- either the one or two hour reading.  Then you will see if you are meeting your targets, and also which foods affect you a lot, and spike high, and take hours to bounce back.   That is the only way that I learned what I should or shouldn't eat.   Because, fasting BGS are only part of the story . :) HUGS. 

    READ MORE
  • gary November 11, 2009
    gary
    November 11, 2009

    hi there.the person who replied the first two times i think is very correct in all they say and it is nice to see people who are knowlegable and very helpfull.can i just say that i could be trying harder as my hba1c is similar to yours and the only thing i was actually going to say was in fact half answered by the second answer given by the last person.

    if i know anything about diabetes,it is to do several blood tests a day and not just the occasional one,as said b4 always do one approx 2 hours after eating,your blood sugars should have stabilised by then,but also do extra ones each day at diffferent times,i have averaged 7 a day for 24 years and if i am not well that goes into double figures,that is the only way to get the correct balance.There is one other very important thing to do that the last writer touched on,and that is to write down your results every time so you can compare them and get a better idea why your level is too high or too low.i go a bit further,i'm sure most people could not be bothered,i write down in columns the time and bg,and if i am eating the carb,fiber,fat,protein,cals and salt,then finish off with a quick description of what i'm eating and how many units of insulin.

    It is a bit time consuming,but it does help when you dont know why your bg is what it is or you can look back to discover what reaction you had the last time you ate what you are thinking of having today.Hope something in this is of some help to you,but unfortunetly i dont think there is a short term fix,if you find one perhaps you can put it here.

    READ MORE
  • Massagemaniac November 11, 2009
    Massagemaniac
    November 11, 2009

     

    The A1c is an overall snapshot of your sugars over a period of 2 to 3 months. 

    There are so many variables to consider including your age, and how long you have been diabetic.  Also, types of foods eaten and portions, also whether you are exercising regularly, and what type of meds you are on, or if you are on any.  And, if you are eating processed foods, too much fruit, and/or too many white starches or rice/potatoes, sweets, etc.   Are you sneaking in extra carbs that you may not realize?  Check your labels, and try to cook at home more.  Example:  I could not find soup that did not have sugar in it.  So, I decided to start making homemade.  Most of the soups list high fructose syrup as a main ingredient.   If you have a nutritionist, talk to him/her about things, and also consult with

    your doctor -- as to strategies and/or meds that can improve your health and condition.  It is important that you communicate with your health care practicioners.  If you are a bit shy or forget what to say when you go to them, write a nice little list, or jot down your questions in advance, so you will not forget them.  I do that, and it helps, because the doctor or np only has so much time to be with each patient.  Keep in mind that each person's diabetes and insulin resistance is different.  So, working with your doctor and your diet,  and exercise, and meds if needed, you can hopefully see results. 

     

    You may also want to look into the Glycemic Load diet.  Eat more green leafy veggies and other healthy veggies.  Eating mostly by way of the glycemic load /index got me from  6.9 at diagnosis to 5.4  (last A1c 5.4).   I do not know if you eat a lot of breads, starches, pizza, pasta, sugar, desserts, but you have to watch, as you know   Keep your portions in check too.   Take a walk, run, or get on a bike or even one at the gym.  Or even dance !  Any weight loss does wonders.  Regular exercise ( especially cardio ) seems to help.   If you are not on meds, let me know.

    READ MORE
You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Content posted by community members does not necessarily reflect the views of Remedy Health Media, which also reserves the right to remove material deemed inappropriate.