Sunday, September 21, 2014

Monday, September 15, 2008 Kari, Community Member, asks

Q: how risky is diabetic pregnancy?

I am 27 yrs old & my husband & I are ready to start a family.  I have been diabetic for 25 years with no complications.  I am currently using an insulin pump.  Growing up I always heard how diabetics shouldn't have babies but now days I am hearing different.

 

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Answers (9)
Cherise Nicole, Health Guide
9/16/08 9:07pm

Kari-

 

Hello! Congrat's on wanting to start a family! I am diabetic also and I have a beautiful 2 year old. It is very possible to have a safe pregnancy. I know most Physicians would like you to have your A1C under 6.0. You will be considered "HIGH" risk when you are pregnant. I am going to be honest with you, IT IS HARD work! You are not only taking care of you, you have someone else to think about. I think I was a little frustrated towards the end because my bg's were out of wack. I know I had to go to the OB a lot but it was worth it:) Kelsey is a diabetic and Expert here. She documented her pregnancy and now motherhood through sharepost. You can check them all out by clicking here.

 

Good luck on starting your new family

 

Cherise

Community Moderator

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Sue B, Community Member
9/18/08 1:54pm

As a diabetic, a mom and a nurse that works in an intensive care nursery, if you are well controlled before you become pregnant and especially during the pregnancy you should have no more problems than other women. There are, of course things that could go wrong with the baby that can go along with being diabetic, but like I said, if you stay in well control and follow closely with your endocrinologist and OB you can have a healthy baby

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LinADB, Community Member
9/18/08 2:05pm

As long as you are willing to go to the doctors (all of them) have tight control of your blood sugar and good communication, you should be ok. When you first get pregnant, within 3 days your blood sugar will sky rocket, at that point you need to call your OB and or your Endocrinologist and find out how they want you to handle it. At around 8 weeks the egg falls off the side of your uterus and for that one day you will have a lot of insulin in your system and your body doesn't realize it is pregnant, but only for one day, so again you have to monitor your blood sugar very carefully and call your endocrinoligist, hopefully you have a good one, I didn't the first time, and I lost the pregnancy, but the next time I had a very good Doctor, and I have a very beatiful, very health son. I was 36 when I had him and I have been a diabetic since I was 7. They will do a lot of test on you the entire time you are pregnant, for me it just made it that much more amazing to watch my son grow.

If you have any questions I would be happy to answer, but I can only give you my personal experience, I cannot give you medical advise. my email address is Linmatta@aol.com

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james, Community Member
9/18/08 3:00pm

my wife and i are both diabetic although her's is more complicated than mine.  seven years ago this past may she gave birth to a premature baby girl that had many birth defects.  these included spinal deformity that is now severe scoliosis, she was missing a kidney, hypocalcemia to the point of being called a "digeorge" baby, was missing half of her ribs on each side, she had seven toes on her left foot (which was turned up on it's side) that she could move, she was suffering from hypoxia, and had heart defects.  she spent the first five months of her life in intensive care and has had heart and orthopedic surgery.  nobody could say what caused it when she was born but now diabeties is known to cause all of her problems.

 

my wife was already five months pregnant before we had a clue because she showed no signs or symptoms and by that time it was too late to do anything but wait.  please read all you can before you make the decision and make all your doctor appointments if you decide to have children. 

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james, Community Member
9/18/08 3:00pm

my wife and i are both diabetic although her's is more complicated than mine.  seven years ago this past may she gave birth to a premature baby girl that had many birth defects.  these included spinal deformity that is now severe scoliosis, she was missing a kidney, hypocalcemia to the point of being called a "digeorge" baby, was missing half of her ribs on each side, she had seven toes on her left foot (which was turned up on it's side) that she could move, she was suffering from hypoxia, and had heart defects.  she spent the first five months of her life in intensive care and has had heart and orthopedic surgery.  nobody could say what caused it when she was born but now diabeties is known to cause all of her problems.

 

my wife was already five months pregnant before we had a clue because she showed no signs or symptoms and by that time it was too late to do anything but wait.  please read all you can before you make the decision and make all your doctor appointments if you decide to have children. 

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Micheleh01, Community Member
9/19/08 5:28am

Wow, I am 30 years old and have been diabetic for 27 years.  I had my first born when I was 21 and my husband and I had twins 3 years ago, when I was 27.  They were both high risk pregnancies. I did great with both. I was not in that great of control when I became pregnant, but was in the best control during the whole pregnancy.  I refused the amniocentisis with both my pregnancies. I proud to say that I proved my doctors and parents wrong with thier early 1980's opinions on diabetics and pregnancy.  We as diabetics are cabable of having children. I was never that worried about Spina bifida, and even if my kids did have it, it would not change a thing.

 

Good luck to you and I suggest starting quickly, at 30 with twin boys I am exhausted.

 

   

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Evie, Community Member
9/20/08 2:51pm

I contracted the big D when I was 26 years old and am now 60 and doing well.

At the age of 21 (probably pre-diabetic) I had my first child, with 3 children following birthed when I was 33, 35 and 39.  During my pregnancies I don't remember any complications (memory probably fails me) but I know that I actually experienced some of my best control.  We didn't have the pump back then just a video cassette sized blood meter. (Can you imagine?)

My children were all over 9 lbs which was a strain, the 3rd one being 10lb9oz).  My first and last were natural births and the two inbetween c-sections.  My docs were terrific, very humane people. I did have LOW blood sugars right after they were born and then experienced a "honeymoon" period of no insulin for a day or so. That was fun.

I would say the more difficult time occured after the baby was born as my levels and my hormones were off.  Having help the first month is the best advice I can recommend... lots of rest with the baby, enjoying the experience not trying to "RESUME" your normal life asap.  That's someone's idea that to me is unnatural. Your life is never the same after having a baby...your whole idea of love is expanded and should be enjoyed, not fought as an interruption of your independence. Keeping that thought in my mind slowed me down, helped me keep on top of my diabetes and enabled me to breast feed successfully.  My husband was incredible during our baby years, doing all the shopping, etc until I was back to myself physically which was about 6 weeks. 

Perhaps you are imagining me as a relatively inactive person. During these years I played on 2 soccer teams, worked 1/2 time (taking a year off for each baby) and worked out at a gym, regularly.  I always put my diabetes first, you have to in order to enjoy your family. Have to say tho' that physical activity has always been a pleasure and I took the opportunity as much as possible. My husband played soccer on the same team so the kids were always amongst people we knew on the sidelines.   Horse-back riding (3 horses at home), soccer, gym, teaching, sounds like I ignored the children, but Alex and I played tag team for years, each working half time so the

kids were with us.  I hope I've helped you sharing this. I think diabetes is nothing to fool around with, that it has to be monitored hourly and by the minute sometimes.

It is a juggling act that requires your attention, as well as your family's. I wish you the best with your decision.

Reply
Evie, Community Member
9/20/08 3:03pm

I contracted the big D when I was 26 years old and am now 60 and doing well.

At the age of 21 (probably pre-diabetic) I had my first child, with 3 children following birthed when I was 33, 35 and 39.  During my pregnancies I don't remember any complications (memory probably fails me) but I know that I actually experienced some of my best control.  We didn't have the pump back then just a video cassette sized blood meter. (Can you imagine?)

My children were all over 9 lbs which was a strain, the 3rd one being 10lb9oz).  My first and last were natural births and the two inbetween c-sections.  My docs were terrific, very humane people. I did have LOW blood sugars right after they were born and then experienced a "honeymoon" period of no insulin for a day or so. That was fun.

I would say the more difficult time occured after the baby was born as my levels and my hormones were off.  Having help the first month is the best advice I can recommend... lots of rest with the baby, enjoying the experience not trying to "RESUME" your normal life asap.  That's someone's idea that to me is unnatural. Your life is never the same after having a baby...your whole idea of love is expanded and should be enjoyed, not fought as an interruption of your independence. Keeping that thought in my mind slowed me down, helped me keep on top of my diabetes and enabled me to breast feed successfully.  My husband was incredible during our baby years, doing all the shopping, etc until I was back to myself physically which was about 6 weeks. 

Perhaps you are imagining me as a relatively inactive person. During these years I played on 2 soccer teams, worked 1/2 time (taking a year off for each baby) and worked out at a gym, regularly.  I always put my diabetes first, you have to in order to enjoy your family. Have to say tho' that physical activity has always been a pleasure and I took the opportunity as much as possible. My husband played soccer on the same team so the kids were always amongst people we knew on the sidelines.   Horse-back riding (3 horses at home), soccer, gym, teaching, sounds like I ignored the children, but Alex and I played tag team for years, each working half time so the

kids were with us.  I hope I've helped you sharing this. I think diabetes is nothing to fool around with, that it has to be monitored hourly and by the minute sometimes.

It is a juggling act that requires your attention, as well as your family's. I wish you the best with your decision.

Reply
kimberly, Community Member
9/20/08 10:50pm

I have had 2 pregnancies since being diagnosed with diabetes. My twins at 37 weeks weighed 6lbs 2 ounces and 6lbs 5 ounces, my youngest weighed 10lbs 7ounces at 40 weeks. My pregnancies weren't bad, I just hated that my 3 girls had to keep being poked due to testing their sugar. As of 9/20/08 my children are healthy at 6years my twins and my youngest is 4 1/2 years old

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By Kari, Community Member— Last Modified: 06/16/12, First Published: 09/15/08