Orange Juice vs. Milk

crdto7 Community Member March 26, 2009
  •   My parents and I disagree over whether I should drink Kroger 2% Milk versus Florida's Natural Orange Juice with Vitamin D and Calcium. I say that orange juice has the same amount of Vitamin D, more Vitamin C, calcium, thiamin, and folate acid, and therefore it would be a healthier choice to drink with dinner. Also, I flat out HATE the taste of milk. My only concerns that I have about this idea is the acid's affect on my teeth (I am supposed to brush after dinner anyways so this shouldn't be too big of a deal), orange juice's lack of protein (I get enough complete proteins as is, so again not a big concern), and the lower amount of Vitamin A.

      My parents, on the other hand, say that  milk has 'better types of fat' (I am confused about this one), has more protein, is 'nature's nuturing drink', and best of all and my favorite, is 'not a conventional drink to have with dinner'. Also, they say it is better for me and my metabolism if I consume more fats than sugars. I don't get this because I am very active, take in about 4000-5000 calories a day, and am constantly burning off energy and eating.

      My question for you is: Given the nutritional contents of both of these items, would it be a better choice for me to drink milk or orange juice with dinner?

4 Comments
  • Anonymous
    scatty
    Jul. 01, 2009

    I saw a dietitican recently because I had anaemia. She advised me to take OJ with my meals because the vit c aids absorbtion of iron. BUT, you could have milk for breakfast with cereal.

    If you are concerned about calcium intake (which you should be - your teeth and bones will serve you well if you look after them) you can have hard cheeses (in moderation),...

    RHMLucky777

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    I saw a dietitican recently because I had anaemia. She advised me to take OJ with my meals because the vit c aids absorbtion of iron. BUT, you could have milk for breakfast with cereal.

    If you are concerned about calcium intake (which you should be - your teeth and bones will serve you well if you look after them) you can have hard cheeses (in moderation), natural yogurt (not the ones with added sugar) or take what we call here skimmed milk. These are higher in calcium and smaller portions will have the desired effect.

    If you take the milk in small quantities and often, you will eventually develop a taste for it - especially if it's icy cold.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    May. 19, 2009

    Ha, ha.  Sorry for your family unrest there.  You sound well informed and very reasonable.  I serve my children milk instead of juice for the lower acid and sugar, and for another reason I don't share with them: price.  As a treat, from time to time I'll buy calcium-fortified juice, but the price differential is enough to steer me towards...

    RHMLucky777

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    Ha, ha.  Sorry for your family unrest there.  You sound well informed and very reasonable.  I serve my children milk instead of juice for the lower acid and sugar, and for another reason I don't share with them: price.  As a treat, from time to time I'll buy calcium-fortified juice, but the price differential is enough to steer me towards milk for them.  For the son who would rather never drink milk, I use calcium-fortified chocolate syrup (there's that sugar coming back), vanilla extract, or maple extract to flavor it.  I have NO reservations about drinking juice at any time of day however.  I'm a Florida girl and live semi-near the Florida's Natural plant, actually.  I just limit how much juice we drink.

  • SeeFit
    Apr. 01, 2009

    I had the same concern about orange juice or any juice with acidity as my dentist told me a little trick to use for protecting the enamel on your teeth.  Use a straw when sipping on the juice, put the straw in the middle of your mouth and sip it back into the throat. In this way you avoid the juice coming in contact with your teeth. Also yes, you have...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I had the same concern about orange juice or any juice with acidity as my dentist told me a little trick to use for protecting the enamel on your teeth.  Use a straw when sipping on the juice, put the straw in the middle of your mouth and sip it back into the throat. In this way you avoid the juice coming in contact with your teeth. Also yes, you have to brush your teeth after either soda or juice because they both will cause tooth enamel problems.  My dentist also advised to rinse out your mouth with water immediately after the juice or meal, and wait 1/2 hour to brush your teeth.  It takes that long for the bacteria to grow back and it does if you brush your teeth right after eating.

     

    Also milk is good for teeth, bone and other nutrients so I would not eliminate it entirely, I used to drink alot of milk when I was younger, and now in my 50's -my bones are very dense and above average.

    Hope this helps you,

     

    • LivingHappy
      May. 28, 2009

      Those are some great tips and I completely agree with you! Kid's teeth are even more prone to acid erosion from acidic drinks/foods so it's so important to take any and all precautions to prevent damage to their enamel... once it's gone, it's gone for good.

       

      Has your dentist mentioned Sensodyne's new kid's toothpaste ProNamel for Children? It...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Those are some great tips and I completely agree with you! Kid's teeth are even more prone to acid erosion from acidic drinks/foods so it's so important to take any and all precautions to prevent damage to their enamel... once it's gone, it's gone for good.

       

      Has your dentist mentioned Sensodyne's new kid's toothpaste ProNamel for Children? It was actually developed to help re-strengthen tooth enamel to protect their teeth from the acidity in their diets! 

       

      They also have a ProNamel toothpaste for adults... it's never too late to start preventing further damage.  

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