Friday, October 24, 2014

Myasthenia gravis

Table of Contents


The stress of illness can often be helped by joining support groups where members share common experiences and problems. See myasthenia gravis - support group.


Expectations (prognosis)

There is no cure, but long-term remission is possible. There may be minimal restriction on activity in many cases. People who have only eye symptoms (ocular myasthenia gravis), may develop generalized myasthenia over time.

Pregnancy is possible for a woman with myasthenia gravis but should be closely supervised. The baby may be temporarily weak and require medications for a few weeks after birth but usually does not develop the disorder.


Complications
  • Complications of surgery
  • Myasthenic crisis (breathing difficulty), may be life threatening
  • Restrictions on lifestyle (possible)
  • Side effects of medications (see the specific medication)

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if you develop symptoms of myasthenia gravis.

Go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911) if you have breathing difficulty or swallowing problems.


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Review Date: 12/21/2009
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Daniel B. Hoch, PhD, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org)