Friday, October 24, 2014

Cerebral angiography

Table of Contents

Definition

Cerebral angiography is a procedure that uses a special dye (contrast material) and x-rays to see how blood flows through the brain.


Alternative Names

Vertebral angiogram; Angiography - head; Carotid angiogram


How the test is performed

Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or large radiology center. You will be asked to lie on an x-ray table. Your head is positioned and held still using a strap, tape, or sandbags, so you do not move during the procedure. The health care provider will attach electrocardiogram (ECG) leads to your arms and legs, which monitor your heart activity during the test.

Before the test starts, you will be given a mild sedative to help you relax.

An area of your body, usually the groin, is cleaned and numbed with a local numbing medicine (anesthetic). A thin, hollow tube called a catheter is placed through an artery and carefully moved up through the main blood vessels in the belly area and chest and into an artery in the neck. Moving x-ray images help the doctor position the catheter.

Once the catheter is in place, a special dye (contrast material) is injected into catheter. X-ray images are taken to see how the dye moves through the artery and blood vessels of the brain. The dye helps highlight any blockages in blood flow.

After the x-rays are taken, the needle and catheter are withdrawn. Pressure is immediately applied on the leg at the site of insertion for 10 - 15 minutes to stop the bleeding. After that time, the area is checked and a tight bandage is applied. Your leg should be kept straight for 4 - 6 hours after the procedure. Watch the area for bleeding for at least the next 12 hours.

Digital subtraction angiography (DSI) uses a computer to "subtract" or take out the bones and tissues in the area viewed, so that only the blood vessels filled with the contrast dye are seen.


How to prepare for the test

You must sign a consent form. Your health care provider will explain the procedure and its risks.

Routine blood tests and examination of the nervous system will be done before the procedure.

  • < Page
  • 1 2
  • >

Review Date: 11/22/2010
Reviewed By: Kevin Sheth, MD, Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org)