Saturday, July 26, 2014

Aortic angiography

Table of Contents

Definition

Aortic angiography is a procedure that uses a special dye and x-rays to see how blood flows through the aorta, the major artery leading out of the heart, and through your abdomen or belly.

Angiography is an imaging test that uses x-rays and a special dye to see inside the arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart.


Alternative Names

Angiography - aorta; Aortography; Abdominal aorta angiogram; Aortic arteriogram


How the test is performed

This test is done in a special unit of the hospital. Before the test starts, you will be given a mild sedative to help you relax.

  • An area of your body, usually in your arm or groin area, is cleaned and numbed with a local numbing medicine (anesthetic).
  • A radiologist or cardiologist will place a needle into the groin blood vessel. A guidewire and a long tube (catheter) will be passed through this needle.
  • The catheter is carefully moved into the aorta. The doctor can see live images of the aorta on a TV-like monitor, and x-rays are used to guide the catheter to the correct position.
  • Once the catheter is in place, dye is injected into it. X-ray images are taken to see how the dye moves through the aorta. The dye helps detect any blockages in blood flow.

After the x-rays or treatments are finished, the catheter is removed. Pressure is immediately applied to the puncture site for 20 - 45 minutes to stop the bleeding. After that time, the area is checked and a tight bandage is applied. The leg is usually kept straight for another 6 hours after the procedure.


How to prepare for the test
  • < Page
  • 1 2
  • >

Review Date: 11/18/2010
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by Shabir Bhimji, MD, PhD, Specializing in General Surgery, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Midland, TX. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org)