Every time I stand up I leak...

Tasha Mulligan MPT Health Pro August 17, 2010
  • If you find it hard to control your bladder when you stand up from a seated position you may want to take a closer look at your sitting posture.  In my previous entries I have talked extensively about how our posture can affect the function of our pelvic floor.  Posture is not something that is only with us when we are standing, but it is just as important when we are sitting.  If your tendency is to sit rolled back on your buns, actually sitting "on" your tail bone, then you are sitting with your pelvic floor muscles completely turned off.  This position moves your tail bone as close to your pubic bone as possible and because these are the two attachment sites for our pelvic floor muscles, they will sag as our tail bone is tucked closer to our pubic bone. 

                    How do I recommend you sit?  There is optimal sitting posture that will give a light tension to your pelvic floor muscles so that they are ready to react when you stand up, cough, laugh, or sneeze.  This is like a track sprinter down in ready position before the starting gun sounds vs. the sprinter who is leaning against the fence talking to a friend when the starting gun sounds.  Our pelvic floor muscles are in the ready position when we have our pelvis rolled forward, giving a slight lift to our tail bone and tension to our pelvic floor muscles..
                    To give your tail bone a slight lift when you are sitting, you want to find your sitting tripod.  The three bony landmarks that make up this tripod are your two sit bones (ischial tuberosities) and your pubic bone.  These are three bony areas that are easy to find because you can touch them.  You want to feel pressure on these three points every time you sit.  You will notice how shifting your weight forward to put pressure on your pubic bone, lifts all pressure off your tail bone.  Now your tail bone has a slight lift and you automatically are in optimal sitting posture and you have that light tension on your pelvic floor muscles that we want so that our muscles can react, closing off the pathway from our bladder as we stand up, cough, or laugh.  You are now that track sprinter down in ready position to react and take off when that starting gun goes off!

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