Dental problems associated with migraine?

carolcg Community Member September 03, 2007
  • On the MAGNUM website, I read that severe dental problems can be caused by migraine. What types of dental problems are these? I have had migraines all my life and this is the first I've heard of this. Now I'm wondering about some of my problems...Thanks, whoever answers this!

    Carol

2 Comments
  • Teri Robert
    Health Guide
    Sep. 04, 2007

    Carol,

     

    Hello, and welcome to MyMigraineConnection!

     

    The MAGNUM site is referring to a couple of problems. Some medications can cause dry mouth, and that can be hard on teeth. Perhaps a bigger issue is the damage that can be done to the teeth by stomach acid if a Migraineur vomits frequently. We've seen this issue. The acid can severely damage...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Carol,

     

    Hello, and welcome to MyMigraineConnection!

     

    The MAGNUM site is referring to a couple of problems. Some medications can cause dry mouth, and that can be hard on teeth. Perhaps a bigger issue is the damage that can be done to the teeth by stomach acid if a Migraineur vomits frequently. We've seen this issue. The acid can severely damage the enamel on the teeth, particularly on the side toward the tongue, leaving the teeth weaker and suceptible to decay and breakage.

     

    One thing to remember is to always rinse the mouth well with water after vomiting. Do NOT brush before rinsing. That essentially brushes the acid around on the teeth.

     

    Hope this is helpful! 

     

    Thank you for creating a SharePost. SharePosts are a form of blogging, and there are many things you can do with them. You can share an experience, suggest something that's helped you, use SharePosts as a Migraine and headache journal, and many other things.

    We also have a discussion forum that you may want to check out. Especially if you have questions or are looking for information, you may find the interaction on the forum to be quite helpful. To get to the forum, just look for the orange box marked "Manage" and click on the Migraine Forums link. Because our forums are maintained by a third party, you'll need to register for the forum. You can use the same information you used to create your community log-in if you like. If you want to go directly to the forum, you can click HERE.

    Along with your personal "My Home" page and the discussion forum, you'll find links to a great deal of helpful information on the main page of our site, http://www.MyMigraineConnection.com.

    If you have any questions, please feel free to post them to the forum or send me a message through my profile.

    Welcome again,
    Teri Robert
    MyMigraineConnection.com Lead Expert
  • Anonymous
    John J. Kelly DDS
    Feb. 27, 2008

     While headaches are typically treated by your physician, an improper bite (the way your teeth and jaw come together) may play a significant role in certain types of headaches as well as other head and neck pain.

    The muscles of the temple area of the forehead are muscles that play an important part in the posturing and closing of the jaw.  I...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

     While headaches are typically treated by your physician, an improper bite (the way your teeth and jaw come together) may play a significant role in certain types of headaches as well as other head and neck pain.

    The muscles of the temple area of the forehead are muscles that play an important part in the posturing and closing of the jaw.  I f your bite is not right, it can lead to abnormal tension in these muscles.  If the bite is not corrected, the muscles may remain tense for a long time. 

      The contracted muscle does not get a chance to rest and soon suffers from poor circulation – thus a lack of needed oxygen and accumulation of waste products of metabolism.  The result can be pain (headache).

       Headaches are just one symptom that may be attributable to a bad bite.  Other symptoms such as pain or noise in the jaw joint, facial pain, sensitive teeth, difficulty chewing, and neck pain may also be related to your occlusion and should be discussed with a neuromuscular dentist.

       If you would like more information about headaches and dentistry e-mail 

    Dr. John Kelly at

    kellycomments@aol.com

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