Establish Safety and Healthy Environment Before Exercise Begins

Jason Chiero, CPT Health Guide
  • Welcome back to those of you who follow my shared post regularly, or are a subscriber to them.  As you know I am currently writing a series on obesity and movement.  This is the third post in that series.  My goal is to help those who suffer from obesity and immobility to be able to move more, become more active and ultimately participate in an exercise program.  I want to pick up where I left off in my last post titled "Victorious Mindset - Obesity and Exercise Part 2" where I talked specifically about changing your current mindset to give you the best opportunity to get moving more and get involved in and exercise program.

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    In this shared post I am going to assume you have determined that it is time to get moving and now we just have to discuss "How"!  The focus of this post will be to help you determine the best environment to facilitate increased movement, and which movements you can complete on a regular basis that are both safe and enjoyable for you.

     

    Let's first talks about your environment.  Your environment should facilitate, or help you to complete your movements.  What I mean is if you are planning on walking and you live in a cold weather environment, but dislike being cold, then focus on finding places for you to walk where the temperature is suitable.  In this case you might want to consider walking inside your house or a gym on a treadmill, or even in a mall. 

     

    I know this point may seem basic, but I constantly see people who want to move more and to burn calories who choose absolutely torturous environments.  It is almost seems like they are trying to punish themselves.  The fact is that your determination to move more will be much better if you focus on finding more environments that are suitable for you to move in!

     

    Now let's talking about which movements you can do that are both safe and enjoyable.  Safety is always first.  It seems logical, but it never makes sense to put your body at risk.  This too probably seems like a very logical consideration, but every day I see people choose exercises that will surely lead to injury.  Sometimes I see this when guys workout with so much resistance for their exercise that they ultimately compromise their technique and joint positioning which leads to injury. 

     

    Now let's talk about identifying movements/activities that you enjoy, or at least movements/activities that you can do without pain.  So I want you to consider movement or exercises that you enjoy.  Remember the goal is to get you moving more, not too do the perfect exercise.  So I want you to get your pen and paper out and make a list of 10 movement/activities that you like doing or can do.

     

    Be creative with this.  It could be walking up the stairs, playing with your dog, walking around your neighborhood, throwing a ball in the front yard, washing the dishes, playing our your Wii, Gardening, ect...In the beginning the movement or activity you choose is not what is important . What is important is that you identify these movements and you do them more often. 

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    So now the process looks like this. First you have to determine the best environment for you to facilitate your movements/activities. Next you identify and list 10 movements or exercises that are safe and enjoyable for you.  Finally you can begin to do more of these movements/acticities.

     

    Congratulations you are making clear, measurable progress. 

     

    Soon I will be releasing the next shared post in this series.  Until then I have a video that will definitely be helpful to you.  This video and the others recently released on my website, helps people just like you develop the "Right Resolve" for you to become the person you want to be.  Just visit my site at the link below for instant access:

     

    www.tinyurl.com/rightresolve

    I hope this helps!

     

    Jason Chiero, CPT

Published On: March 11, 2010